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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
As a young boy, Paul Christiano loved the world of girls - the way they danced, how their spindly bodies tumbled in gymnastics. In adolescence, as other boys ogled classmates, he was troubled to find himself fantasizing about 7- to 11-year-olds. His desires remained stuck in time as he neared adulthood. Despite a stable home life in suburban Chicago, he was tortured by urges he knew could land him in prison. "For having these feelings, I was destined to become a monster," he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
April 6, 2014 | By Jen Leo
Here's the latest trip-planning website that can help you craft your own guidebook. Name: http://www.BonVoyaging.com What it does: It's a Web bookmarking tool that lets you collect and store your travel itineraries, complete with maps and the ability to download and share. Cost: Free What's hot: This website has two things that will keep me coming back: its beautiful, design-friendly layout, and the ability to print out a PDF of my itinerary. I love being able to access my travel plans from my smartphone or tablet, as well as sharing with my friends on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, but I'm still a paper girl at heart.
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SCIENCE
March 10, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Victims of bullying were more than twice as likely as other kids to contemplate suicide and about 2.5 times as likely to try to kill themselves, according to a new study that quantifies the emotional effects of being teased, harassed, beaten up or otherwise harmed by one's peers. Children and teens who were taunted by cyberbullies were especially vulnerable -- they were about three times as likely than other kids to have suicidal thoughts, the study found. The findings, published online Monday by the journal JAMA Pediatrics, puts the lie to the old adage about sticks and stones.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014
The company: Acacia Research Corp. Headquarters: Newport Beach Ticker: ACTG Employees: 68 Leadership: Matthew Vella, 42, chief executive since 2013 2013 revenue: $130.6 million 2013 net loss: $56.4 million Stock price: $17.19 at Friday's close 52-week range: $12.23 to $30.36 Quarterly dividend: 12.5 cents a share, a current yield of 2.9%
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Scientists know that the best way to make a vodka martini is to mix the ingredients with a thin wooden spoon -- it combines the ingredients effectively without raising the drink's temperature the way a metal stirrer would. So why would James Bond, the world's most sophisticated martini drinker, routinely order his cocktail “shaken, not stirred”? A trio of British medical researchers believe they have the answer: The heavy-drinking 007 most likely suffered from an alcohol-induced tremor that forced him to shake his martinis.
OPINION
May 27, 2012 | By Meg Jay
It's graduation time again, and according to the National Center for Education Statistics, about 1.78 million students will walk across a stage and pick up a college diploma. Then they will face terrifying statistics about employment, pressure to make their 20s the best years of their lives, and slogans that suggest that what you do right after college may not matter anyway. What not enough graduates are hearing, however, is that - recession or not - our 20s are life's developmental sweet spot.
NEWS
January 9, 2011 | By Eryn Brown
You know that feeling you get when you listen to a favorite part of a favorite song?  Some scientists have a refreshingly unscientific word for it: They call it the "chills. " In the lab they can measure the chills, which correspond with a specific pattern of brain arousal and often are accompanied by increases in heart and breathing rates and other physical responses.   Now neurologists report that this human response to music -- which has existed for thousands of years, across cultures around the world -- involves dopamine, the same chemical in the brain that is associated with the intense pleasure people get from more tangible rewards such as food or addictive drugs.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
British researchers have determined that a little-studied chemical in the cannabis plant could lead to effective treatments for epilepsy, with few to no side effects. The team at Britain's University of Reading, working with GW Pharmaceuticals and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, tested cannabidivarin, or CBDV, in rats and mice afflicted with six types of epilepsy and found it “strongly suppressed seizures” without causing the uncontrollable shaking and other side effects of existing anti-epilepsy drugs.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Serving hot food on melamine tableware could increase your exposure to melamine, a study released Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine suggests.  Melamine, an industrial chemical used in everyday items such as cooking utensils, plates, paperboard and industrial coatings can apparently seep into food when it's heated, the study said. In two separate tests , researchers from Kaohsiung Medical University and Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital in Taiwan served a dozen participants about two cups of hot noodle soup in melamine bowls and ceramic bowls.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Howard Blume
David Koff, a filmmaker and union activist whose investigation of a campus construction project profoundly changed the Los Angeles school system, has died. He was 74. He committed suicide March 6 in Hastings, N.Y., his family said. Koff was the indefatigable researcher who, in the 1990s, took on the Belmont Learning Complex, turning it into a symbol of civic dysfunction as it became the nation's most expensive high school. Outside Los Angeles, Koff was best known as a talented documentary filmmaker who took uncompromising stands.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alzheimer's disease and other dementias not only destroy the lives of those who suffer from them but take a devastating toll on family caregivers and on those who must pay the cost of care. An estimated 5 million people in the United States suffer from Alzheimer's. But that number will increase exponentially in the years ahead because of what Robin Barr, a senior official at the National Institute on Aging, calls "an aging tsunami. " A highly cited published research analysis estimates that the number of people with Alzheimer's around the world will jump from 36 million today to 115 million by 2050.
SCIENCE
March 17, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Researchers at MIT are giving plants super powers by placing tiny carbon nanotubes deep within their cells. Some of the altered plants increased their photosynthetic activity by 30% compared with regular old plants. Others were able to detect tiny traces of pollutants in the air. And that's just the beginning. Medicines and machines, inspired by nature "The idea is to impart plants with functions that are non-native to them," said Michael Strano, professor of chemical engineering at MIT. Strano's lab has been working at the nexus of plant biology and nanotechnology -- an area called plant nanobionics -- for three years, trying to figure out how to give plants new abilities.  Their first challenge was getting the nanotubes into the plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo
It costs about $2,000 to buy an ounce of the illegal drug, the therapist said - enough for roughly 150 doses. She pays her longtime dealer in cash; he gives her a Ziploc bag of white powder. Back home, she scoops the contents into clear capsules. She calls it "the medicine"; others know it as MDMA, the active ingredient in the party drug Ecstasy. MDMA has been banned by the federal government since 1985 as a dangerous recreational drug with no medical value. But interest is rising in its potential to help people suffering from psychiatric or emotional problems.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Evan Halper and Cindy Carcamo
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration handed backers of medical marijuana a significant victory Friday, opening the way for a University of Arizona researcher to examine whether pot can help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress, a move that could lead to broader studies into potential benefits of the drug. For years, scientists who have wanted to study how marijuana might be used to treat illness say they have been stymied by resistance from federal drug officials. The Arizona study had long ago been sanctioned by the Food and Drug Administration, but under federal rules, such experiments can use marijuana only from a single, government-run farm in Mississippi.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
After combing through 656,000 photos on Instagram from five global cities, a team of data researchers has come to a conclusion: Selfies say more about you than you think. The science of selfies is serious business, says Lev Manovich, project coordinator behind SelfieCity.net. “Selfies, you know we have interesting opinion, but they are just based on maybe a few thousand selfies we look at,” said the Russian-born researcher and author in heavily accented English. “We thought, why don't we take a more objective look.” To study the selfie phenomenon, Manovich -- a computer science professor at City University New York -- and a team of seven researchers scanned the globe.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Has anyone with a sibling not been in the back seat of a car, someone hitting someone and parents threatening to pull over “right this minute”? Just seems like part of growing up, right? Well some researchers say not necessarily. Parents, doctors and schools should not dismiss sibling bullying, they said. Sibling aggression can be as damaging as other sorts of bullying, and it can be linked to poorer mental health, according to a study published this week in the journal Pediatrics.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan and Monte Morin
The Japanese research institution at the center of a growing controversy over a new type of stem cells said Friday that its investigation of four scientists has confirmed two instances of "inappropriate" behavior but that neither case was severe enough to be considered intentional misconduct or outright fabrication of data. An investigative committee at RIKEN, which is funded primarily by the Japanese government, has been looking into charges that two high-profile papers published in January in the journal Nature included plagiarized material, duplicate photos and doctored figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
According to a new study released Thursday by the Pew Research Center, public libraries are thriving thanks to a core group of devotees who have qualities we don't usually associate with bookish people -- they are, generally speaking, more sociable and active people than those who don't go to libraries. The report , which surveyed more than 6,000 people over age 16, paints a somewhat surprising portrait of American library lovers. More than two-thirds of Americans are “actively engaged” with their public libraries.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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