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NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Hugo Martin, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The reservation system and website for United Airlines failed Tuesday afternoon, delaying takeoffs and preventing some passengers from checking in at airport. [Updated 3:30 p.m., Aug. 28: Shortly after 3 p.m., United issued a statement saying it was "in the process of resuming normal operations following a temporary network outage that affected its airports and website. " ] The airline confirmed a problem with its system but did not offer details. "A network outage is affecting our airport and united.com functions," airline spokeswoman Mary Ryan said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The U.S. Department of Transportation has fined United Airlines $350,000 for delaying more than 9,000 refund requests from passengers. The agency also cited the carrier for filing inaccurate data for lost or damaged luggage,  overbooking planes in 2011 and failing to file timely reports on the losses or deaths of animals. Under federal rules, commercial carriers must refund tickets paid with cash or check within 20 days and within seven days for fares paid with credit cards.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
American Airlines and Delta Airlines said Friday that they are involved in discussions to merge their computer reservation systems. The airlines said that if a transaction were concluded, they would establish an independent company to operate the system. American's computerized system, called Sabre, is already the largest of five U.S. computerized systems with more than 8,000 locations. Delta's system, called DATASII, is the smallest, with about 2,000 locations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Flights in and out of Los Angeles International Airport were operating normally Tuesday morning after a computer outage at a online reservation system caused delays worldwide. Airlines at LAX first reported problems in the Sabre reservation system at about 9:30 p.m. Monday. About 17 flights experienced delays of 15 to 45 minutes, according to Nancy Castles, public relations director at LAX. Airlines affected included Frontier, American, American Eagle, JetBlue, Virgin America, Alaska, Cathay Pacific, Qantas, British Airways, WestJet and LAN Fiji Air. Passengers were checked in manually and no flights were canceled, Castles said.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. District Court jury in Los Angeles ruled Friday that American Airlines and United Airlines had not unfairly exercised monopoly power in the use of their computerized reservation systems. After 10 days of deliberations and a lengthy trial, the jury voted 10-2 not to hold the two giant carriers liable.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing pressure from travel agents and tour operators, the California Division of Tourism clamped a 60-day moratorium on its new toll-free telephone and Internet system that allowed travelers to make their own lodging reservations. The tourism office will conduct a series of meetings to hear comments on whether the state should be offering travel services. The department then will present recommendations to a legislative committee.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Northwest Airlines, Delta Air Lines and Trans World Airlines said Thursday that they have reached preliminary agreement to combine their computer reservation systems. By some calculations the new entity could become the nation's second-largest computer reservations operation. The consolidation will decrease to four the number of such systems operating in the United States, all of them large and competitively powerful. There are also several overseas competitors.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1990 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas Air Corp. said Wednesday that it will sell half of its System One computer reservation system to Electronic Data Systems for $250 million. EDS, a subsidiary of General Motors Corp., said it expects to generate income of $4 billion from the deal. Under a 10-year joint venture, EDS will furnish information technology services to Continental Airlines and Eastern Airlines, both of which are Texas Air subsidiaries.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1987 | MARTHA M. HAMILTON, The Washington Post
One of the hardest-fought marketing battles in the airline industry doesn't involve discount fares or frequent-flier programs. It's a battle for computer reservation systems. In just a few years, these systems have become critically important tools for airlines. They have radically transformed the distribution system through which airline tickets are sold and offer carriers undreamed-of opportunities for fine-tuning their marketing.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1994 | From Reuters
Southwest Airlines Co., the nation's most profitable carrier, launched its own computer reservation system Wednesday to combat a move by rival carriers to curb travel agent access to the Dallas-based airline. Southwest, known for no-frills service, has kept costs low partly by refusing to pay fees to major computer reservation systems for displaying its schedule and fares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Several airlines are reporting delays at Los Angeles International Airport and elsewhere late Monday after a worldwide online reservation system developed glitches. "At approximately 9:25 p.m. tonight, LAX Airport Operations received a report of a system outage at SABRE, a worldwide online reservation system used by some domestic airlines ... and international carriers ... at LAX," read a statement from Nancy Castles, public relations director at LAX.  Castles said airlines including Frontier, American, American Eagle, JetBlue, Virgin America, Alaska, Cathay Pacific, Qantas, British Airways, WestJet and LAN Fiji Air have been affected and "are reporting delays of 15 to 30 minutes, which may go longer.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2013 | By Hugo Martín and Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The combination of American Airlines and US Airways will create the world's largest airline. And, if critics are to be believed, it will also cause world-class headaches for customers. If previous airline mergers are any guide, melding the two carriers into a behemoth with more than 100,000 employees is likely to lead to reservation glitches, union tension, higher fares and cuts in service to smaller, less-profitable cities. During the announcement of the $11-billion deal Thursday, chief executives of US Airways and American promised an idyllic marriage that will benefit consumers and shareholders.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Wall Street may get another reminder of discontent with inequality and corporate America next month as "Occupy" protesters say they plan to disrupt Manhattan's financial district. Demonstrators plan to mark the first anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, which morphed into a global protest movement last year, with a three days of events, including a concert, that will culminate on Sept. 17, according to the website s17nyc.org. Planned disruptions include obstructing intersections around the New York Stock Exchange and elsewhere in the financial district, as well as other "autonomous or mass actions" that morning, a Monday, according to the website.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | Bloomberg News
United Continental Holdings Inc. experienced a major passenger reservation system failure that has blocked automated check-ins at airports and affected its website, according to FlightAware.com. The airline confirmed a network outage affecting airports and its website Tuesday, without offering any specifics. "We are working to resolve the issue and minimize any impact to our operations," said Mary Ryan, a spokeswoman for Chicago-based United. United can check in passengers manually while working to get its system back online, FlightAware.com Chief Executive Daniel Baker said.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Hugo Martin, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The reservation system and website for United Airlines failed Tuesday afternoon, delaying takeoffs and preventing some passengers from checking in at airport. [Updated 3:30 p.m., Aug. 28: Shortly after 3 p.m., United issued a statement saying it was "in the process of resuming normal operations following a temporary network outage that affected its airports and website. " ] The airline confirmed a problem with its system but did not offer details. "A network outage is affecting our airport and united.com functions," airline spokeswoman Mary Ryan said in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2009 | Bloomberg News
American Airlines said Hewlett-Packard Co. would design a computerized system for reservations, pricing and ticketing that could become the industry standard. The companies signed a letter of intent to develop the program, called Jetstream, in the next four years. Jetstream is intended to improve efficiency and consistency, reducing operating costs. Hewlett-Packard would be able to sell the system to other airlines, capitalizing on the Palo Alto computer company's $13.2-billion purchase a year ago of services giant Electronic Data Systems Corp.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1988 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Allegis Corp., the parent company of United Airlines, said Monday that it will sell 49.9% of its computerized reservation system to USAir and four European airlines for just under $500 million. Allegis, which will change its name back to UAL Inc. later this month, will retain control of the system through its Covia Corp. subsidiary, which will hold 50.1%. (The company's name was UAL for many years but was changed to Allegis in 1987.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2008 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
U-Haul International Inc. has settled a class-action lawsuit that had accused the equipment rental giant of deceiving California customers through its reservations policy. The settlement came amid U-Haul's appeal of a court ruling that found it had engaged in fraudulent business practices. In the 2006 ruling, Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge Samuel S. Stevens barred U-Haul agents from promising "confirmed reservations" for one-way equipment rentals in California.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Interior Department has rejected a plan to create a nuclear waste stockpile on the Goshute Indians' Skull Valley reservation, about 50 miles southwest of Salt Lake City. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) said the decision killed a proposal to store 44,000 tons of spent fuel rods on the reservation. "To me, it's a great day for Utah," Hatch said.
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