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Reservation Systems

BUSINESS
August 13, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge has found "direct evidence" that the nation's largest operator of computerized airline ticketing systems, American Airlines, has exercised lucrative monopoly power over the airline ticket reservation market, and he allowed 12 smaller carriers to proceed with a $300-million antitrust suit. In a decision handed down late Friday in Los Angeles, U.S.
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NEWS
November 11, 1987 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The Transportation Department, in its first public findings in a campaign aimed at reducing complaints from disgruntled airline passengers, announced Tuesday that, in September, almost one in four of the major airlines' flights arrived at least 15 minutes late. American Airlines, with an 84.5% on-time performance, was the best among the 14 major airlines that are now required by the Transportation Department to disclose delay rates.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you plan to stay at a Westin hotel or rent a Hertz car, you call for a reservation and, upon arriving at the front desk or counter, produce your ID and credit card to get your room or vehicle. No ticket required. So why can't the airlines operate that way? A few are doing so--and the rest are giving it serious thought. Ticketless air travel is coming.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
Looking for a California park where you can take the family camping this summer? Better make your reservations quickly because the campsites are filling up. Although California has a plethora of campgrounds--about 1,200 throughout the state--they are snapped up early each year. By now, premium beach or lakeside sites are mostly sold out for summer weekends. And don't even consider a Memorial Day or Fourth of July weekend at the popular campgrounds, because they've been reserved for months.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When leading U.S. airlines moved last week to cap travel agents' commissions on airplane tickets, Jackie Abkion was furious. "The airlines are trying to get rid of us," said the Glendale travel agent. And the commission cap was not her only complaint: Hotels are cutting their payments to agents. Big corporate customers are demanding discounts. And even large retailers such as Costco are writing discount plane tickets for customers. "This is what the travel industry has come to," Abkion moaned.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2008 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
U-Haul International Inc. has settled a class-action lawsuit that had accused the equipment rental giant of deceiving California customers through its reservations policy. The settlement came amid U-Haul's appeal of a court ruling that found it had engaged in fraudulent business practices. In the 2006 ruling, Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge Samuel S. Stevens barred U-Haul agents from promising "confirmed reservations" for one-way equipment rentals in California.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1995 | From The Baltimore Sun
The $215 round-trip fare looks good. You call the airline but discover that seats are no longer available at that price. You can buy a ticket for $274. Or you might call back next week and find the $215 fare available after all. Confused? Blame it on technology, and the airlines' desire to squeeze the most money out of each flight.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
American Airlines' parent company announced plans Thursday to sell part of its reservations system, Sabre Group Holdings Inc., taking a step toward giving the technology business its independence. The Sabre unit of AMR Corp. registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission for an initial public offering of up to $550 million in stock. It did not say how many shares will be sold in the long-anticipated spinoff. The price of shares typically is set close to the sale date.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1995 | CAROL SMITH
Ticketless travel, the airline industry's gambit to wean passengers away from paper tickets, earned another convert this week when Alaska Airlines became the latest carrier to announce its entry into the world of electronic ticketing. With ticketless travel, customers receive a confirmation number over the phone when they purchase the ticket. The airline will mail a written confirmation and itinerary if requested, but no paper ticket is issued.
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