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BUSINESS
December 16, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. District Court jury in Los Angeles ruled Friday that American Airlines and United Airlines had not unfairly exercised monopoly power in the use of their computerized reservation systems. After 10 days of deliberations and a lengthy trial, the jury voted 10-2 not to hold the two giant carriers liable.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Flights in and out of Los Angeles International Airport were operating normally Tuesday morning after a computer outage at a online reservation system caused delays worldwide. Airlines at LAX first reported problems in the Sabre reservation system at about 9:30 p.m. Monday. About 17 flights experienced delays of 15 to 45 minutes, according to Nancy Castles, public relations director at LAX. Airlines affected included Frontier, American, American Eagle, JetBlue, Virgin America, Alaska, Cathay Pacific, Qantas, British Airways, WestJet and LAN Fiji Air. Passengers were checked in manually and no flights were canceled, Castles said.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
American and Delta airlines still hope to merge their computerized reservations systems by May 1, despite a Justice Department antitrust investigation, airline officials said Wednesday. The department, which on Jan. 1 took over jurisdiction of airline industry mergers from the Transportation Department, has sent requests for information to both airlines and has issued several "civil investigative demands" to other companies that might be affected, according to Delta and American officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Several airlines are reporting delays at Los Angeles International Airport and elsewhere late Monday after a worldwide online reservation system developed glitches. "At approximately 9:25 p.m. tonight, LAX Airport Operations received a report of a system outage at SABRE, a worldwide online reservation system used by some domestic airlines ... and international carriers ... at LAX," read a statement from Nancy Castles, public relations director at LAX.  Castles said airlines including Frontier, American, American Eagle, JetBlue, Virgin America, Alaska, Cathay Pacific, Qantas, British Airways, WestJet and LAN Fiji Air have been affected and "are reporting delays of 15 to 30 minutes, which may go longer.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
In a deal that ultimately could be worth $2 billion, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines said Sunday that they would combine their computerized reservations systems, creating a "global" behemoth that will handle about half of the nation's airline reservations. American's system, named Sabre, is already the nation's largest with computer locations at about 14,000, or 42%, of the nation's 33,000 travel agents. Delta is a very small player with only about 9% of the market.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1985
Eighteen U.S. and international airlines set up a committee to study creation of an independent computerized airline reservations system. Travel agents, who make about 85% of all airline bookings, now use one of five systems, all operated by individual airlines. Other airlines have complained that those systems favor their owners in the way they display fare and flight data. The aim of a new system would be to offer complete and unbiased information.
TRAVEL
July 7, 1996
Travelers to many of California's state parks are now able to reserve campsites up to seven months in advance instead of the former limit of 56 days or less. With the Destinet reservation service--which also provides reservations at several national parks, including five in California--travelers can use a credit card to reserve family and group campsites at almost 80 of the 110 state park campgrounds, as well as booking tours at Hearst Castle.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2009 | Bloomberg News
American Airlines said Hewlett-Packard Co. would design a computerized system for reservations, pricing and ticketing that could become the industry standard. The companies signed a letter of intent to develop the program, called Jetstream, in the next four years. Jetstream is intended to improve efficiency and consistency, reducing operating costs. Hewlett-Packard would be able to sell the system to other airlines, capitalizing on the Palo Alto computer company's $13.2-billion purchase a year ago of services giant Electronic Data Systems Corp.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department on Thursday rejected the planned merger of the computer reservations systems of American Airlines and Delta Air Lines, saying it would result in "higher fares and poorer service for airline passengers." In response, the carriers said they agreed to terminate the merger, which would have created a global giant that would have handled about half of the nation's airline reservations. Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh's decision will deprive each carrier of as much as $375 million that they planned to generate by selling shares in the merged system.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
American Airlines and Delta Airlines said Friday that they are involved in discussions to merge their computer reservation systems. The airlines said that if a transaction were concluded, they would establish an independent company to operate the system. American's computerized system, called Sabre, is already the largest of five U.S. computerized systems with more than 8,000 locations. Delta's system, called DATASII, is the smallest, with about 2,000 locations.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | Bloomberg News
United Continental Holdings Inc. experienced a major passenger reservation system failure that has blocked automated check-ins at airports and affected its website, according to FlightAware.com. The airline confirmed a network outage affecting airports and its website Tuesday, without offering any specifics. "We are working to resolve the issue and minimize any impact to our operations," said Mary Ryan, a spokeswoman for Chicago-based United. United can check in passengers manually while working to get its system back online, FlightAware.com Chief Executive Daniel Baker said.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Hugo Martin, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The reservation system and website for United Airlines failed Tuesday afternoon, delaying takeoffs and preventing some passengers from checking in at airport. [Updated 3:30 p.m., Aug. 28: Shortly after 3 p.m., United issued a statement saying it was "in the process of resuming normal operations following a temporary network outage that affected its airports and website. " ] The airline confirmed a problem with its system but did not offer details. "A network outage is affecting our airport and united.com functions," airline spokeswoman Mary Ryan said in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2009 | Bloomberg News
American Airlines said Hewlett-Packard Co. would design a computerized system for reservations, pricing and ticketing that could become the industry standard. The companies signed a letter of intent to develop the program, called Jetstream, in the next four years. Jetstream is intended to improve efficiency and consistency, reducing operating costs. Hewlett-Packard would be able to sell the system to other airlines, capitalizing on the Palo Alto computer company's $13.2-billion purchase a year ago of services giant Electronic Data Systems Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2004 | DAVE McKIBBEN, Times Staff Writer
It is one of the oldest, most affordable and best-maintained public golf courses in Orange County. But you pretty much had to live inside the city limits if you wanted the best shot at playing San Clemente Municipal Golf Course. For about a decade, San Clemente residents were given a 30-minute jump on preferred morning tee times -- leaving nonresidents scrambling for the leftovers.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | Gavin Rabinowitz, Associated Press Writer
At home, Eran Kurtzer is a suburbanite with a wife, baby daughter and small insurance agency. But for six weeks a year, 33-year-old Kurtzer is an army major leading a company of paratroopers on patrols through olive groves on the hills of the West Bank. He and his unit are among thousands of Israeli men who once a year are torn from their everyday routine and thrust back into uniform.
SPORTS
November 26, 2002 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
So how do you figure the Philadelphia Eagles? A week ago, starting quarterback Donovan McNabb broke his ankle and they won the game. Then, on Monday night, backup quarterback Koy Detmer dislocated his elbow and they won again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Garner has been a firefighter for 25 years. That's a quarter-century of missed birthday parties, interrupted Christmas dinners and saved lives. But "Big John," as the men at Tustin's Station 21 call him, is hanging up his boots and putting down his helmet for good. Garner's not retiring. He's only 49, and he was never a full-time career firefighter to begin with.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing pressure from travel agents and tour operators, the California Division of Tourism clamped a 60-day moratorium on its new toll-free telephone and Internet system that allowed travelers to make their own lodging reservations. The tourism office will conduct a series of meetings to hear comments on whether the state should be offering travel services. The department then will present recommendations to a legislative committee.
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