Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReserve Bank Of India
IN THE NEWS

Reserve Bank Of India

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Central Bank Orders Audit of 4 Foreign Banks: Citibank and Bank of America will be audited by government authorities in Bombay as part of India's investigation into a billion-dollar financial scandal. India's central bank also ordered a detailed scrutiny of the books of two other foreign banks, Australia's Grindlays Bank and the London-based Standard Chartered Bank.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Central Bank Orders Audit of 4 Foreign Banks: Citibank and Bank of America will be audited by government authorities in Bombay as part of India's investigation into a billion-dollar financial scandal. India's central bank also ordered a detailed scrutiny of the books of two other foreign banks, Australia's Grindlays Bank and the London-based Standard Chartered Bank.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 29, 1997 | Bloomberg News
India's central bank announced a package of measures to defend the rupee after the Indian currency declined 6.5% this month to its all-time low of 38.60 to the dollar. The measures include delaying a plan to lower reserve requirements of commercial banks, absorbing excess money in the financial system and encouraging exporters to bring their earnings into the country sooner rather than later.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | From Reuters
India's Supreme Court, in a landmark judgment, has recognized a child's mother as a guardian equal to the father under Indian law, officials said Friday. The ruling Thursday came in response to a petition from Githa Hariharan, an English-language writer, and her husband, who challenged the Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act framed in 1956, saying it discriminated against women.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Sikh separatists dressed as police officers looted a bank Thursday and escaped with $4.5 million, the biggest bank heist in Indian history, officials said. "It was a neat and clean operation," a police spokesman said. No casualties were reported. More than 10,000 security troops were deployed across Punjab state in a hunt for the suspects. Bank robberies have been a major means of financing the Sikh militants' violent campaign for a separate state they call Khalistan.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | DEV VARAM, Reuters
Half a million indebted Indian farmers have filed for insolvency in an unprecedented campaign to publicize their plight. The "freedom from debt" movement started in April in western Maharashtra state and farmers' leaders say it is spreading across the country. "We want the farmers to have the moral courage to say that they cannot repay the loans they have taken from banks and cooperatives," said Sharad Joshi, founder and leader of Shetkari Sanghatana (Farmers' Movement).
BUSINESS
June 15, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Old-fashioned industry in India grew 11.5% in the last fiscal year, boosting hopes of broader-based economic growth in a country that has seen rapid expansion of high-tech and back-office services. Figures released by the Indian government this week showed a rise in productivity in traditional sectors such as manufacturing, mining and electricity, which contributed to the nation's overall annual growth rate of 9%, one of the world's highest. The 11.
WORLD
November 27, 2008 | Mark Magnier and Subhash Sharma, Magnier is a Times staff writer and Sharma is a special correspondent.
Coordinated groups of gunmen shot and blasted their way through tourist sites in the Indian financial center of Mumbai late Wednesday and early today, killing at least 101 people and wounding more than 200 while apparently targeting American and British citizens for use as hostages. The attackers swept through two luxury hotels favored by foreigners, the Taj Mahal Palace and the Oberoi, firing automatic weapons, throwing grenades and sending panicked guests scrambling for safety.
WORLD
March 3, 2008 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Learning your ABCs can be a tough proposition in India. Not the alphabet; even Indians who can't speak English fluently know their letters. But pity the poor soul who strays unprepared into the world of newspapers, magazines, documents, signs, billboards -- in short, anywhere there's text -- only to find that minding your Ps and Qs, literally, can be a headache. That's because this land sometimes seems to have as many initials, acronyms and abbreviations in usage as it does people.
OPINION
August 4, 1985 | Rone Tempest, Rone Tempest is The Times' correspondent in New Delhi.
Driving through the countryside of this lush green part of India, with the intoxicating smell of the country's richest land pouring in through the car windows, it is hard to imagine a problem here. For the first time since the Indian army raid on the Sikhs' Golden Temple at Amritsar in June, 1984, foreign reporters have been allowed into the state of Punjab.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every developing nation has its tests of corporate machismo. In India, executives trade horror stories about electrical power outages. "I was talking to a contractor not so long ago and his record last year was 13 power cuts in one day," said Julian Archer, managing director of Birla Parsons, a Delhi-based joint venture of Parsons Corp., a giant Pasadena-based engineering and construction firm.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|