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Reservoir Dogs

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By John Horn
 At the recent Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Oscar nominee Quentin Tarantino was the recipient of the American Riviera Award for his screenwriting. The event included a conversation in front of 2,000 festival guests and clips of his films throughout his career. Here is the transcript of that Jan. 30 conversation with L.A. Times writer John Horn; it has been edited for length and language: OSCARS 2013: Full coverage John Horn: Thank you very much. Great reception.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Owen Gleiberman, a film critic for Entertainment Weekly for more than two decades, was laid off from the magazine along with six other staff members on Wednesday, according to Poynter. The others are senior writer Josh Rottenberg, staff writer Annie Barrett, music critic Nick Catucci, senior editor Kerrie Mitchell, deputy design director David Schlow and product director Chad Schlegel, Poynter said . Gleiberman was one of EW's best-known and most widely read bylines, having written at the magazine since its launch in 1990.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Like it or not (and many people will have their doubts), writer-director Quentin Tarantino has arrived, in your face and on the screen. His brash debut film, "Reservoir Dogs," a showy but insubstantial comic opera of violence, is as much a calling card as a movie, an audacious high-wire act announcing that he is here and to be reckoned with. Strong violence is Tarantino's passion, and he embraces it with gleeful, almost religious, fervor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Hateful Eight" is bold work by an artist pushing himself to the creative edge as he devises a Rubik's Cube of contradictions for his audience. I'm not supposed to know this yet. That I have an opinion about an unmade movie is because of the leak of a script that angered its writer-director enough to file a lawsuit and pledge to shelve the project. But it would be a crime if Quentin Tarantino's "The Hateful Eight" became a victim of the Internet's fondness for disseminating all things illicit from sex tapes to now, apparently, scripts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Like it or not (and many people will have their doubts), writer-director Quentin Tarantino has arrived, in your face and on the screen. His brash debut film, "Reservoir Dogs," a showy but insubstantial comic opera of violence, is as much a calling card as a movie, an audacious high-wire act announcing that he is here and to be reckoned with. Strong violence is Tarantino's passion, and he embraces it with gleeful, almost religious, fervor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In 1968, 29-year-old actor Harvey Keitel introduced himself to the movies by starring in "Who's That Knocking at My Door?," the first film by his pal, director Martin Scorsese. Set against the backdrop of the strict Catholicism of New York's Little Italy, the film examined a young man's struggle to reconcile the sacred and the profane and was an intensely personal experience for both men.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It is hard to say what is more dispiriting about "True Romance," the movie itself or the fact that someone somewhere is sure to applaud its hollow, dime-store nihilism and smug pseudo-hip posturing as a bright new day in American cinema. In truth this latest example of Hollywood's growing fascination with Bad Boy Chic (the kind of films where the men are violence-prone misfits and the women gasp and coo) has all the originality of a paper cup.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1994 | Hilary de Vries, Hilary de Vries is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Perhaps it is genius at work, an audible whir, evidence of synapses plying their magic in a West Hollywood apartment complex. The junk mail in the front hallway suggests this scenario could be true: "Quentin Tarantino or Current Resident." "I'm in the kitchen!" It is here that he lives, 31 years old and a legendary filmmaker with just a pair of movies--"Reservoir Dogs," his 1992 cult hit, and now "Pulp Fiction," the winner of this year's Palme d'Or at Cannes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1998
Re "They Clear the House" (by Michael Kaplan, Feb. 8): "Little Green Bag" by the George Baker Selection was my favorite song, briefly, in the spring of 1970. Unfortunately, it quickly fell out of play and off the face of the Earth. So what a delightful surprise to bring home "Reservoir Dogs" and hear my old fave right off the bat! Thanks Mary Ramos and Michele Kuznetsky. STEVEN FOSTER Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Sally Menke, director Quentin Tarantino's longtime editor on films such as " Pulp Fiction," "Jackie Brown" and the two-volume "Kill Bill," was found dead early Tuesday morning by searchers in Bronson Canyon after she went hiking with her dog in the severe heat Monday, authorities said. She was 56. Search dogs, Los Angeles Police Department helicopters and patrol unit officers spent hours in Griffith Park searching for Menke after her friends alerted authorities about 4 p.m. Monday when she failed to return home.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The Gecko Brothers are back. So promises the first full-length trailer for the upcoming TV series "From Dusk Till Dawn," based on the 1996 cult horror flick directed by Robert Rodriguez, penned by Quentin Tarantino and starring Tarantino and George Clooney. The 10-episode series, which will air on Rodriguez's new English-language El Rey Network aimed at Latino audiences, revisits the saga of bank robber Seth Gecko (played by Clooney in the film and D.J. Cotrona in the series) and his unpredictable brother, Richie ( Zane Holtz, taking over for Tarantino)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Harvey and Bob Weinstein are getting the reunion they've long sought - and moviegoers could end up getting sequels to such older favorites as "Shakespeare in Love," "Swingers" and "Rounders. " The brothers' film company, Weinstein Co., has struck a production and distribution deal that reconnects them to Miramax, the company they founded in 1979 and built up with such critically acclaimed movies as "sex, lies and videotape" and "Reservoir Dogs" before selling to Walt Disney Co. in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant and David Zahniser
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to make a closed coffee shop used in the movie "The Big Lebowski" a historic-cultural landmark. Councilman Paul Koretz said Johnie's at Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue is one of the most notable examples of work by the firm Armet & Davis, the architectural firm that designed Norms, Pann's and other diners across Southern California. Koretz, who represents the area, said he hopes the property's owners can be talked into reopening the building as a coffee shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
TORONTO -- One of the hottest tickets for this year's Toronto International Film Festival wasn't for a movie, but for a reading of a movie -- Jason Reitman's live read of Paul Thomas Anderson's 1997 classic "Boogie Nights. " Some festival-goers waited outside Ryerson Theatre for more than three hours for a chance to listen to the "Boogie Nights" script being delivered by the likes of Jesse Eisenberg (reading the Mark Wahlberg role of well-endowed porn star Dirk Diggler) and Josh Brolin (Jack Horner)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The feature debut from the Australian sibling writer-director team of Colin and Cameron Cairnes, "100 Bloody Acres" somehow manages to be both retro and up to date with its giddy, delightful gross-out horror-comedy mash-up storytelling. In the story, two brothers - draw your own connections there - are struggling to keep their organic fertilizer business going. The overbearing Lindsay (Angus Sampson) and meek Reg (Damon Herriman) have been using human bodies in the formula and are running out of their secret ingredient.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
In "Family Weekend," onetime "High School Musical" cast member Olesya Rulin plays a competitive high-school jump-roper who takes her parents hostage after they miss one meet too many. Aided by her younger brother and sister, the teen's plan is to hold them in their house long enough to take them all with her to the state finals. The hostage comedy can be tricky business, done successfully in films such as "The Ref" or "Swimming With Sharks," and director Benjamin Epps and screenwriter Matt K. Turner just about pull it off. Such films must manage a fine balancing act between the victims (where an audience's sympathy naturally goes)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Owen Gleiberman, a film critic for Entertainment Weekly for more than two decades, was laid off from the magazine along with six other staff members on Wednesday, according to Poynter. The others are senior writer Josh Rottenberg, staff writer Annie Barrett, music critic Nick Catucci, senior editor Kerrie Mitchell, deputy design director David Schlow and product director Chad Schlegel, Poynter said . Gleiberman was one of EW's best-known and most widely read bylines, having written at the magazine since its launch in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
Geoffrey Gilmore has resigned as director of the Sundance Film Festival to take on the job of chief creative officer of Tribeca Enterprises, the New York-based media company founded by Jane Rosenthal, Robert De Niro and Craig Hatkoff that owns and operates the Tribeca Film Festival, Tribeca Cinemas and other ventures. Gilmore's departure is sure to send a quake through independent cinema, as he has presided over the nation's most influential independent film festival for the last 19 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By John Horn
 At the recent Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Oscar nominee Quentin Tarantino was the recipient of the American Riviera Award for his screenwriting. The event included a conversation in front of 2,000 festival guests and clips of his films throughout his career. Here is the transcript of that Jan. 30 conversation with L.A. Times writer John Horn; it has been edited for length and language: OSCARS 2013: Full coverage John Horn: Thank you very much. Great reception.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
Quentin Tarantino is still cutting “Django Unchained” ahead of its Dec. 25 release, a point he noted with a mixture of relish and nervousness at the Hollywood Film Awards Monday night. But fans who want a little Tarantino fix at the multiplex before “Django” hits will get their chance. Two of the filmmaker's most beloved works, “Reservoir Dogs” and “Pulp Fiction,” are getting the one-night-only theatrical treatment. “Reservoir Dogs” will play nationally Dec. 4 and “Pulp Fiction” will play Dec. 6 in events being dubbed “Tarantino XX,” a group of companies that includes Miramax (which owns rights to the films)
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