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Reservoir Dogs Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX
It's January, 1991 and Quentin Tarantino, 27, is in his fifth year of trying to become a movie actor or screenwriter. He's working at a video store in Manhattan Beach and getting rejection after rejection from Hollywood. Flash forward to January, 1992. Tarantino returns to his mother's home in Glendale after a week at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The phone is ringing wildly. Agents are calling. Deals are being offered. What changed Hollywood's view of Tarantino? Simple.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | Andy Marx
Although Quentin Tarantino's "Reservoir Dogs" created a stir at the recent Sundance Film Festival and is quite the buzz around Hollywood, don't look for it in theaters anytime soon. It doesn't have a distributor yet, though Tarantino says that is all about to change. "We will be settling that up in the next week or two," says Tarantino. "As of right now, it's down to two companies and we're just working out the final details."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | Andy Marx
Although Quentin Tarantino's "Reservoir Dogs" created a stir at the recent Sundance Film Festival and is quite the buzz around Hollywood, don't look for it in theaters anytime soon. It doesn't have a distributor yet, though Tarantino says that is all about to change. "We will be settling that up in the next week or two," says Tarantino. "As of right now, it's down to two companies and we're just working out the final details."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX
It's January, 1991 and Quentin Tarantino, 27, is in his fifth year of trying to become a movie actor or screenwriter. He's working at a video store in Manhattan Beach and getting rejection after rejection from Hollywood. Flash forward to January, 1992. Tarantino returns to his mother's home in Glendale after a week at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The phone is ringing wildly. Agents are calling. Deals are being offered. What changed Hollywood's view of Tarantino? Simple.
BOOKS
February 25, 1996 | Patrick Goldstein
Armed with these three quickie biographies, it is now possible to learn everything you could ever want to know about ballyhooed auteur Quentin Tarantino, including such tidbits as the first time Tarantino ever saw snow (at the 1992 Sundance Film Fest) to the revelation that his first production job in Hollywood was as an assistant on a Dolph Lundgren workout video. Every era gets the culture hero it deserves, so it seems fitting that the retro '90s have Tarantino, a high school dropout and frustrated actor whose films offer the ultimate in video geek aesthetic: clever pastiches of scenes cribbed from Jean-Luc Godard and John Woo, narrative devices from Stanley Kubrick and kung fu movies, mysterious briefcases from "Kiss Me Deadly," wardrobe from Mickey Rourke in "The Pope of Greenwich Village," set design from race car movies like Elvis' "Speedway" and knowing irony from the music of 1970s one-hit wonders like Stealers Wheel and the George Baker Selection.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dozen years as a newspaper reporter, I have asked for only two autographs. One of them was from my childhood idol, pool player Steve Mizerak. The other was from Becky. You know-- Becky, the ex-topless dancer in the cult classic "Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer." In the end of the movie, she gets hacked to pieces, her dismembered body abandoned inside a baby-blue suitcase. I first saw "Henry" four years ago as a Sunday matinee.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2003 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
It came from a credit card, from a body sold to science, from the insurance payout on a car crash. Or so said the mythology. Advocates of the independent film movement love to point out how its key movies emerged not from a studio machine but from scrappy young directors cobbling money together, bent on pursuing their visions and changing the way movies were made. They were to be our home-grown Godards and Antonionis -- or heirs to two-fisted American mavericks like Cassavetes and Peckinpah.
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