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Reservoirs Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called for more public hearings on a controversial plan for the future of Chatsworth Reservoir, delighting preservationists who sought greater guarantees against development. The Board of Water and Power Commissioners delayed action on the plan at the request of David Freeman, general manager of the DWP.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Irregular shapes and a variety of exterior finishes set a bold tone at this newly built contemporary in Bel-Air. Walls of glass offer views of the Stone Canyon Reservoir, downtown Los Angeles and the distant mountains. Location: 2170 Stradella Road, Los Angeles 90077 Asking price: $8.85 million Year built: 2013 Architect: Patrick J. Killen House size: Six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, 5,402 square feet Lot size: 26,642 square feet Features: Steel-beam framing, concrete and wood floors, retractable walls of glass, high ceilings, three indoor fireplaces, open dining area, home theater, office, 73-foot solar-heated infinity pool, spa, fire pit, three-car garage About the area: Last year, 157 single-family homes sold in the 90077 ZIP Code at a median price of $1.945 million, according to DataQuick.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
A two-hour community open house will be held today to mark the completion of more than 10 years of repairs at the newly reconfigured Rowena Reservoir in Los Feliz. Built in 1902, the open-air reservoir was rebuilt after state officials ordered it closed in 1991 because of an earthen dam weakened by the 1987 Whittier earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
A two-hour community open house will be held today to mark the completion of more than 10 years of repairs at the newly reconfigured Rowena Reservoir in Los Feliz. Built in 1902, the open-air reservoir was rebuilt after state officials ordered it closed in 1991 because of an earthen dam weakened by the 1987 Whittier earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of bureaucratic tug-of-war, the Department of Water and Power has at last agreed to preserve all of the Chatsworth Reservoir, one of the city's largest remaining tracts of unprotected wildlands. In a letter sent Friday to the DWP board in advance of Tuesday's meeting, General Manager S. David Freeman said the agency now wants "preservation of the entire site as a nature preserve." "All of the property will remain in its current state," according to Freeman's letter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Councilman Hal Bernson asked the City Council on Wednesday to consider redesigning the Chatsworth Reservoir, which has been drained for more than 20 years as seismically unsafe, so it will fill with runoff from future rainstorms as a drought-fighting measure. Environmentalists reacted with concern, expressing fears for the wildlife refuge that now occupies the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
To save as much as $100 million, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power officials have announced a proposal to take the Encino and Lower Stone Canyon reservoirs out of daily service. Since the water would be used only in emergencies or during droughts, the decision would allow the DWP to build smaller filtration systems at each reservoir, officials said. "It's a marvelous result after all this hard work," Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Feuer said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ending a long battle over the fate of the Chatsworth Reservoir, the Los Angeles Board of Water and Power Commissioners voted Tuesday to safeguard the entire 1,300-acre site in the northwest San Fernando Valley as a nature preserve. The unanimous decision was a victory for Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson, who has long pushed for preservation of the property. The outcome left Bernson's deputy, Francine Oschin, dancing outside the meeting, singing "Yes, yes, yes!"
BUSINESS
February 15, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Irregular shapes and a variety of exterior finishes set a bold tone at this newly built contemporary in Bel-Air. Walls of glass offer views of the Stone Canyon Reservoir, downtown Los Angeles and the distant mountains. Location: 2170 Stradella Road, Los Angeles 90077 Asking price: $8.85 million Year built: 2013 Architect: Patrick J. Killen House size: Six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, 5,402 square feet Lot size: 26,642 square feet Features: Steel-beam framing, concrete and wood floors, retractable walls of glass, high ceilings, three indoor fireplaces, open dining area, home theater, office, 73-foot solar-heated infinity pool, spa, fire pit, three-car garage About the area: Last year, 157 single-family homes sold in the 90077 ZIP Code at a median price of $1.945 million, according to DataQuick.
SPORTS
March 18, 1988
Striped bass usually become increasingly active as spring draws near and that has been the case at two Southland reservoirs. In Los Angeles County, Pyramid Lake has been yielding stripers in the 5-pound range, but the bigger fish have come out of San Bernardino County's Lake Silverwood, where Billy Berseth of Hesperia topped the week's action with a 24-pounder. Larry Marriott of Alta Loma caught one weighing 20 pounds, and several were in the 15-pound class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ending a long battle over the fate of the Chatsworth Reservoir, the Los Angeles Board of Water and Power Commissioners voted Tuesday to safeguard the entire 1,300-acre site in the northwest San Fernando Valley as a nature preserve. The unanimous decision was a victory for Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson, who has long pushed for preservation of the property. The outcome left Bernson's deputy, Francine Oschin, dancing outside the meeting, singing "Yes, yes, yes!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of bureaucratic tug-of-war, the Department of Water and Power has at last agreed to preserve all of the Chatsworth Reservoir, one of the city's largest remaining tracts of unprotected wildlands. In a letter sent Friday to the DWP board in advance of Tuesday's meeting, General Manager S. David Freeman said the agency now wants "preservation of the entire site as a nature preserve." "All of the property will remain in its current state," according to Freeman's letter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called for more public hearings on a controversial plan for the future of Chatsworth Reservoir, delighting preservationists who sought greater guarantees against development. The Board of Water and Power Commissioners delayed action on the plan at the request of David Freeman, general manager of the DWP.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
To save as much as $100 million, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power officials have announced a proposal to take the Encino and Lower Stone Canyon reservoirs out of daily service. Since the water would be used only in emergencies or during droughts, the decision would allow the DWP to build smaller filtration systems at each reservoir, officials said. "It's a marvelous result after all this hard work," Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Feuer said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Councilman Hal Bernson asked the City Council on Wednesday to consider redesigning the Chatsworth Reservoir, which has been drained for more than 20 years as seismically unsafe, so it will fill with runoff from future rainstorms as a drought-fighting measure. Environmentalists reacted with concern, expressing fears for the wildlife refuge that now occupies the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2008 | Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writer
Silver Lake Reservoir -- the century-old neighborhood landmark drained earlier this year -- started to look like its old self again Wednesday. The reservoir got its first drink in months when officials turned on the water Wednesday to start the 20-day process of refilling its 600-million-gallon, clay-based shell. The emptying of the reservoir began in January.
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