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Reservoirs Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the decision a day away, it was uncertain Monday how the City Council would vote tonight on a proposed reservoir that has become increasingly controversial since the terrible fire three weeks ago. Councilman Wayne L. Peterson has urged the council to approve an agreement allowing the Laguna Beach Water District to build a 3-million-gallon reservoir at one of the highest points in the city. Peterson has argued that the reservoir would have significantly helped firefighters Oct.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No mail reaches Ron Staub's little cottage up in the canyon--no bills, no postcards, nothing. The house has no street address and not even much of a street. It sits by itself on a rocky, wind-swept hillside populated by deer, rattlesnakes and mountain lions, four miles from the nearest neighbor. To buy milk, or rent a movie, Staub points his battered pickup across a rocky creek bed and down a private one-lane road, stopping twice to let himself through locked gates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hundreds of catfish, carp and large-mouth bass living in a reservoir off Ball Road were stunned by an electric shock and transported to a Garden Grove lake late Tuesday, Orange County Water District officials said. The district relocated the fish to a lake used by local nonprofit groups to teach children from low-income families about fishing and nature. The fish were rendered temporarily immobile using a special boat that sends a current into the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hundreds of catfish, carp and large-mouth bass living in a reservoir off Ball Road were stunned by an electric shock and transported to a Garden Grove lake late Tuesday, Orange County Water District officials said. The district relocated the fish to a lake used by local nonprofit groups to teach children from low-income families about fishing and nature. The fish were rendered temporarily immobile using a special boat that sends a current into the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The Mesa Consolidated Water District has agreed to dip into its emergency reserves and spend $1 million to help pay for repairs to the San Joaquin Reservoir, which was damaged in last winter's rains. The agency's budget has been squeezed by higher costs to buy water from suppliers and the expense of construction projects, officials said. The agency's board of trustees has been debating how to pay for repairs to the reservoir, which was damaged by mudslides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE
Capping a controversy that has been simmering for years, water district officials have finished building a giant new reservoir at one of this city's highest points. Perched on 3.5 acres more than 1,000 feet above sea level, the Top of the World reservoir will supply about 3 million gallons of water for use in such emergencies as earthquakes and fires, like the one that swept Laguna in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No mail reaches Ron Staub's little cottage up in the canyon--no bills, no postcards, nothing. The house has no street address and not even much of a street. It sits by itself on a rocky, wind-swept hillside populated by deer, rattlesnakes and mountain lions, four miles from the nearest neighbor. To buy milk, or rent a movie, Staub points his battered pickup across a rocky creek bed and down a private one-lane road, stopping twice to let himself through locked gates.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
In the Los Angeles value system, a water view ranks high, up there with a sleek, fast car and Laker season tickets. The beach people watch the water from the shore, with close-up vistas of breaking waves. The canyon people see it from the mountains, where the most prized panoramas include a patch of distant ocean blue. And while the reservoir people may have a less spectacular view, it affords them no less pleasure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | JANET WILSON and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nine months before the rupture of a Westminster reservoir unleashed 5 million gallons of water into a neighborhood this week, an industrial inspector warned city officials that an earthquake might have damaged portions of the tank. But instead of ordering a seismic study, the city ran the inspector's findings by a second consultant, who dismissed them as "nothing to worry about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
In the Los Angeles value system, a water view ranks high, up there with a sleek, fast car and Laker season tickets. The beach people watch the water from the shore, with close-up vistas of breaking waves. The canyon people see it from the mountains, where the most prized panoramas include a patch of distant ocean blue. And while the reservoir people may have a less spectacular view, it affords them no less pleasure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE
Capping a controversy that has been simmering for years, water district officials have finished building a giant new reservoir at one of this city's highest points. Perched on 3.5 acres more than 1,000 feet above sea level, the Top of the World reservoir will supply about 3 million gallons of water for use in such emergencies as earthquakes and fires, like the one that swept Laguna in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The Mesa Consolidated Water District has agreed to dip into its emergency reserves and spend $1 million to help pay for repairs to the San Joaquin Reservoir, which was damaged in last winter's rains. The agency's budget has been squeezed by higher costs to buy water from suppliers and the expense of construction projects, officials said. The agency's board of trustees has been debating how to pay for repairs to the reservoir, which was damaged by mudslides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the decision a day away, it was uncertain Monday how the City Council would vote tonight on a proposed reservoir that has become increasingly controversial since the terrible fire three weeks ago. Councilman Wayne L. Peterson has urged the council to approve an agreement allowing the Laguna Beach Water District to build a 3-million-gallon reservoir at one of the highest points in the city. Peterson has argued that the reservoir would have significantly helped firefighters Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County may see the recession's grip loosening ever so slightly in 1993--good news for many who were hard hit by layoffs, cutbacks and downsizing. But don't uncork the champagne yet. Chapman University President James L. Doti said that according to the university's Center for Economic Research, the county's economy is in a much slower recovery mode than the rest of the nation. "Say you are sick on Wednesday with a cold. On Thursday, you're recovering.
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