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Residency Eligibility

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NEWS
August 1, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
The House on Monday approved legislation making it easier for an estimated 32,000 Chinese students residing in the United States to remain here and avoid persecution in their homeland. On a voice vote, the House backed a measure by California Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) deleting a visa requirement that such students return to China for two years before becoming eligible to apply for permanent residency in the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis and Emilie Mutert
Despite persistent economic woes, California leaves billions of federal food stamp dollars on the table each year that could help ease hunger and boost the local economy, officials say. Only 48% of eligible Californians are enrolled in the nutrition program, according to federal figures from 2007, the most recent year available. That is well below the national average of 66%. Only Wyoming has a slightly lower rate. California officials dispute the way the figures are calculated and say they do not reflect recent steps to improve the state's record, including greater outreach and simplified procedures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She first came to America to visit. She returned for love. Now Jasmin Salehi may be forced out of her adopted country in sorrow: The South Korean woman is apparently not eligible to live in the United States because she had not been married long enough to her husband when he was shot to death by a robber. "I didn't have two years," Salehi said, referring to the immigration marriage rule that may send her away. "My husband was murdered. What should I do?"
BUSINESS
May 3, 2004 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
When Microsoft Corp. agreed last year to settle a massive class-action lawsuit by California customers who accused the company of overcharging them for its software, it pledged to pay them as much as $1.1 billion. It turns out the company probably will shell out $165 million or less to customers. The reason: Most consumers either don't know about the deal or are too lazy to fill out the forms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN
Guy Taylor, a 16-year-old Canadian orphan, entered an INS hearing office in Los Angeles on Friday wearing a Dodgers baseball cap, a black Raiders jersey and baggy jeans--the epitome of an average American kid. He left smiling 20 minutes later, holding a certificate that allows him to continue living the life of an average American kid, at least for a year. "I won," the lanky teenager said as he walked out of the downtown Federal Building.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as Navy corpsman Alfredo B. Quiambao is concerned, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has turned out to be a tougher adversary than the Iraqi army. Quiambao, along with Marines from the 1st Marine Regiment, defeated the Iraqis in a brief but pitched battle for the Kuwait International Airport during the Persian Gulf War. During the battle, Quiambao, 31, earned the Navy Achievement Medal for treating wounded Marines under fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET, Times Staff Writer
Figures of death--two masked women wearing clothes painted with skeletons--opened the play Sunday, marching and singing "Ya murio Senor Don Gato, ya lo vamos enterrar" (Senor Don Gato's dead, let's bury him). Writer, director and actor Jaime Gomez welcomed the audience at Santa Ana's Fiesta Marketplace, then turned to the women and played on their former vanities: "Why are you skeletons, still lovely as you are, wandering around predicting someone's death?"
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
El Rescate, a nonprofit group that provides social and legal assistance to Central Americans, is launching a monthlong campaign this week to re-register Salvadorans who previously signed up for temporary protected status with the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
SPORTS
June 18, 1993 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES PREP SPORTS EDITOR
The Crenshaw High boys' basketball team, under investigation for alleged eligibility violations, was cleared of any wrongdoing by the L.A. Unified School District's athletic department on Thursday. The announcement concluded a five-week investigation by Hal Harkness, district athletic commissioner. It was prompted by a May 8 article in The Times that alleged four of the team's nine transfers last season did not meet residence eligibility requirements.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2004 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
When Microsoft Corp. agreed last year to settle a massive class-action lawsuit by California customers who accused the company of overcharging them for its software, it pledged to pay them as much as $1.1 billion. It turns out the company probably will shell out $165 million or less to customers. The reason: Most consumers either don't know about the deal or are too lazy to fill out the forms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN
Guy Taylor, a 16-year-old Canadian orphan, entered an INS hearing office in Los Angeles on Friday wearing a Dodgers baseball cap, a black Raiders jersey and baggy jeans--the epitome of an average American kid. He left smiling 20 minutes later, holding a certificate that allows him to continue living the life of an average American kid, at least for a year. "I won," the lanky teenager said as he walked out of the downtown Federal Building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She first came to America to visit. She returned for love. Now Jasmin Salehi may be forced out of her adopted country in sorrow: The South Korean woman is apparently not eligible to live in the United States because she had not been married long enough to her husband when he was shot to death by a robber. "I didn't have two years," Salehi said, referring to the immigration marriage rule that may send her away. "My husband was murdered. What should I do?"
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
El Rescate, a nonprofit group that provides social and legal assistance to Central Americans, is launching a monthlong campaign this week to re-register Salvadorans who previously signed up for temporary protected status with the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
SPORTS
June 18, 1993 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES PREP SPORTS EDITOR
The Crenshaw High boys' basketball team, under investigation for alleged eligibility violations, was cleared of any wrongdoing by the L.A. Unified School District's athletic department on Thursday. The announcement concluded a five-week investigation by Hal Harkness, district athletic commissioner. It was prompted by a May 8 article in The Times that alleged four of the team's nine transfers last season did not meet residence eligibility requirements.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as Navy corpsman Alfredo B. Quiambao is concerned, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has turned out to be a tougher adversary than the Iraqi army. Quiambao, along with Marines from the 1st Marine Regiment, defeated the Iraqis in a brief but pitched battle for the Kuwait International Airport during the Persian Gulf War. During the battle, Quiambao, 31, earned the Navy Achievement Medal for treating wounded Marines under fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET, Times Staff Writer
Figures of death--two masked women wearing clothes painted with skeletons--opened the play Sunday, marching and singing "Ya murio Senor Don Gato, ya lo vamos enterrar" (Senor Don Gato's dead, let's bury him). Writer, director and actor Jaime Gomez welcomed the audience at Santa Ana's Fiesta Marketplace, then turned to the women and played on their former vanities: "Why are you skeletons, still lovely as you are, wandering around predicting someone's death?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis and Emilie Mutert
Despite persistent economic woes, California leaves billions of federal food stamp dollars on the table each year that could help ease hunger and boost the local economy, officials say. Only 48% of eligible Californians are enrolled in the nutrition program, according to federal figures from 2007, the most recent year available. That is well below the national average of 66%. Only Wyoming has a slightly lower rate. California officials dispute the way the figures are calculated and say they do not reflect recent steps to improve the state's record, including greater outreach and simplified procedures.
SPORTS
October 30, 2008 | Lance Pugmire
The Southern Section said Wednesday it has started an inquiry into whether any rules were broken in the numerous transfers of talented boys basketball players who have played at perennial CIF power Compton Dominguez High. "We have received a request from the CIF Southern Section, and the request is under consideration at this time," Compton Unified School District spokeswoman Christine Sanchez said.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
The House on Monday approved legislation making it easier for an estimated 32,000 Chinese students residing in the United States to remain here and avoid persecution in their homeland. On a voice vote, the House backed a measure by California Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) deleting a visa requirement that such students return to China for two years before becoming eligible to apply for permanent residency in the United States.
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