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NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
Fires are an everyday occurrence in Detroit - the city has seen around 11,000 a year in the last decade, according to a June report. But the fire that broke out Wednesday morning in an apartment building in Detroit's west side was particularly virulent. Images showed bright yellow flames consuming the Jason Manor apartment building, setting off thick, black clouds of smoke, which nearly hid the “For Rent” sign on the building.   Firefighters rescued about 25 people from the three-story apartment building, which was so engulfed in flames that people were jumping out windows to escape.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The state Senate is under pressure to expel Sen. Roderick D. Wright for felony convictions that involve lying about living in his district when he ran for the upper house. But such a vote might be awkward for some of his colleagues who have faced questions about their own residency. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) raised the issue during a bitter floor debate last week, before a Republican motion to oust Wright was blocked by his fellow Democrats and sent to a committee to languish until the lawmaker's May 16 sentencing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A band of homeowners associations have lined up in opposition to allowing a Bel-Air home to exceed city height rules, arguing that hillside development restrictions are being eroded by granting exceptions to some landowners. “Little by little, they are dismantling” the hillside ordinance enacted three years ago, said Marian Dodge, president of the nonprofit Federation of Hillside and Canyon Assns., which includes dozens of local groups. If this home is allowed to build higher, she argued, “any neighbor can say, 'Why can't I?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A former UCLA water polo player has been indicted on charges of raping and sexually assaulting three women between October 2012 and last April. Hakop Jack Kaplanyan, 19, of Glendale was charged in an eight-count indictment unsealed Monday by a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge. At least one of the alleged assaults occurred at a UCLA residence hall, according to officials. Kaplanyan was arrested Friday by UCLA police, who had been investigating allegations against the former Glendale Hoover High standout since first arresting him last April.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | John M. Glionna
He's a painfully private entrepreneur with very public dreams for this city's decaying downtown core. Around Sin City, giddy officials are heralding online shoe retailer Tony Hsieh as a visionary, the latest in a line of moneyed Las Vegas dreamers such as billionaire Howard Hughes and casino mogul Steve Wynn. Mayor Carolyn Goodman says Hsieh is offering people a chance to open their dream businesses, and "that can't be bad. " Former Mayor Oscar Goodman's description of the city's confidence in Hsieh harks back to the mayor's days as a mob lawyer: Anyone who doubts Hsieh's sincerity, he said at a public meeting, should have his legs broken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Scott Gold, Ruben Vives and Hailey Branson-Potts
A potent storm gave Southern California a more thorough soaking on Friday than it has seen in more than three years, bringing both cheers in a drought-stricken state and anxiety as it sent mud billowing through hillside neighborhoods and clogged roads. Downtown Los Angeles saw more rain by Friday afternoon - 1.7 inches - than it had seen during the entire rest of the "rain year," starting last July. For some, it was a harrowing day - for two drivers who were rescued after getting trapped by a rock slide near Malibu; for two men rescued from a downed tree in the suddenly roiling Los Angeles River; for hundreds who lost electricity when a power pole toppled over near a Long Beach police station.
WORLD
February 28, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
HEBRON, West Bank - Nidal lives just steps from the mosque where his life changed forever. It was there, during early morning prayers in 1994, that an Israeli physician named Baruch Goldstein walked in and opened fire, killing 29 Palestinians and wounding 125. Nidal, then 25 and engaged to be married, was shot twice in one arm and once in the back. The massacre at the Ibrahim mosque at the Tomb of the Patriarchs, a holy site for Muslims, Jews and Christians in the West Bank city of Hebron, occurred 20 years ago this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
In the morning while walking to her car, Michelle Kennedy sometimes detects a smell like cat urine. The asthma her 6-year-old suffers seems to have worsened. Kennedy blames the oil and gas wells pumping in and near her South Los Angeles neighborhood. She was especially troubled to hear that acid was being injected in some shafts roughly a mile from her home. Now Los Angeles could put a stop to several practices that Kennedy and her neighbors have lobbied against, at least inside its city limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - A $687.4-million emergency drought relief package is on its way to Gov. Jerry Brown's desk after easily clearing the Legislature on Thursday. Brown and legislative leaders unveiled the proposal last week to free up the state's water supplies and aid residents who face hardship due to the drought. "Today we provide significant relief," state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said in a floor speech. "This is a lot of money and will help thousands of California families dealing with the drought.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
AMADO, Ariz. - Border-area residents, upset with what they called an increased militarized presence in their community, began an effort Wednesday to monitor Border Patrol actions at a federal immigration checkpoint about 25 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border in southern Arizona. Organizers with a humanitarian aid group called People Helping People in the Border Zone have called on the Border Patrol to remove the checkpoint in Amado, a town of about 300 people. Some residents say they have to deal with unnecessary delays, harassment and sometimes abuse at the checkpoint.
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