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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Resident Theatre Company, which has produced the Muckenthaler Cultural Center's summer Theatre-on-the-Green program for three years, has parted ways with the center, citing attempts by center trustees to interfere--complaints similar to those that last week led to the resignation of the center's curator.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before the 1960s, a play's path from creation to the stage was fairly cut-and-dried. Someone wrote it, a producer optioned it, and they chose a director with whom the playwright worked in shaping it. Then it went onstage. Today, "the process," as it is known in theater circles, is much more involved. A perfect example is the Playwrights Festival, a program in its ninth year at Fullerton College. The festival, which opened Jan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before the 1960s, a play's path from creation to the stage was fairly cut-and-dried. Someone wrote it, a producer optioned it, and they chose a director with whom the playwright worked in shaping it. Then it went onstage. Today, "the process," as it is known in theater circles, is much more involved. A perfect example is the Playwrights Festival, a program in its ninth year at Fullerton College. The festival, which opened Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Resident Theatre Company, which has produced the Muckenthaler Cultural Center's summer Theatre-on-the-Green program for three years, has parted ways with the center, citing attempts by center trustees to interfere--complaints similar to those that last week led to the resignation of the center's curator.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Gee, life sure is complicated for Eugene, the ripely adolescent mini-hero of Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs." First, there is all that puberty business to deal with (uh-oh, cousin Nora sure is looking good these days). Then there is mom, always nagging, and dad, always acting world-weary and put-upon (a kid could feel guilty or something). And what about big brother Stanley, losing his job in a fight over principles with his boss--right when the family really needs the cash. What to do?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
Dámaso Rodriguez, director and co-founder of the Pasadena Playhouse's resident Furious Theatre Company, has been appointed the Playhouse's associate director. In the newly created position, Rodriguez will report directly to Artistic Director Sheldon Epps. Rodriguez, winner of best direction awards from the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle and the NAACP for Furious works, will continue to provide leadership to the resident company.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1988 | MARK CHALON SMITH
On the surface, Gerald Moon's British whodunit "Corpse!" seems betrayed by an overworked plot: Prancing actor Evelyn Farant wants some money, lots of it. His identical twin Rupert has money, lots of it. What to do? Why, bump off brother and take his place in opulent West End society, of course. If that doesn't seem to add up to much, don't worry. The Resident Theatre Company's production at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center actually adds up to quite a bit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Whodunits, with their arch characters and exaggerated plot turns, are ready made for teasing. One of the best murder mystery spoofs is "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940," now at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center's Theater-on-the-Green. The Resident Theatre Company of Fullerton, under Allison Liddi's direction, dives right into John Bishop's comedy, thickening the silly accents and gassing up the outlandish acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Agatha Christie's "The Mousetrap" has the distinction of being the longest running show in London. For more than three decades it has been an institution for tourists and natives alike--the stage equivalent of the Tower of London or Big Ben. The reasons for its remarkable longevity might not be obvious to the newer breed of mystery fans whose theater experience lies more with the baroque plot shimmies and challenging mind play of contemporary playwrights such as Ira Levin ("Deathtrap").
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
The Resident Theatre Company doesn't do anything especially original with "Little Shop of Horrors"--it's all infused with the usual doo-wop pep, and the characters--from nerdy Seymour to sweet, weak Audrey--are all in place. But the familiar is performed with colorful confidence. Director Mary Bettini has brought a spoofy show featuring a lively cast and one hungry mother of a house plant--Audrey II--to the Muckenthaler Cultural Center's outdoor stage in Fullerton. Audrey II bellows just as it is supposed to, and everybody else keeps pace with its appetite for misadventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to avoid future power struggles like one that prompted its curator to resign in April, the Muckenthaler Cultural Center's board of directors on Wednesday created a committee to define authority over the center's performing and visual arts programs. "The board doesn't want to get up in the position they were in before," said Wes Morgan, Fullerton's community services superintendent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH and 'SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR' A Resident Theatre Company production of the Bernard Slade play at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center. Director Sydell Weiner. With Veda Franklin and Gary Weissbrot. Sets Gil Morales. Costumes Lynda Krinke. Lighting Steve Pliska. Sound design James Innocente. Plays Thursday through Sunday through July 26 at 8:15 p.m., with dinner served at 7 p.m. Tickets: $15-$18.50. The center is at 1201 W. Malvern Ave., Fullerton. (714) 871-8101.
If you're going to do "Same Time, Next Year" successfully, you'd better make sure the actors playing Doris and George are more than accomplished. They've got to be likable as well. As the only characters in this Bernard Slade comedy, they must sustain our interest for more than two hours as they age through 25 years of love, lust and life's labors. If the performances are flat, the play can be an exercise in tedium.
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