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Residue

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SCIENCE
August 3, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Archaeologists have found residues of cacao -- or chocolate -- on 2,500-year-old plate fragments from the Northern Maya Lowlands in Yucatan, Mexico. Although cacao residue has been found in cups from other sites that are 1,000 years older, this is the oldest trace of cacao in this northern region. Perhaps more important, it is the first evidence that the Maya used cacao for anything other than as a drink. The presence of cacao on a plate suggests that it was used as a spice or sauce for food.
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OPINION
November 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
After more than a decade of U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan - and almost 2,300 American deaths - many Americans would be content if this country reduced its troop presence there from the current 47,000 to zero by the end of next year. That's the point at which Afghan forces are supposed to take responsibility for internal security. But the Obama administration makes a persuasive case that some residual force is necessary to ensure that country's stability. After months of painstaking negotiations, U.S. and Afghan officials recently reached a bilateral security agreement designed, in President Obama's words, "to train security forces, and sustain a counter-terrorism force, which ensures that Al Qaeda can never again establish a safe haven to launch attacks against us or our allies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1986 | Roxana Kopetman
Almost three months after the city granted a salvage yard a reprieve from being shut down, the operation has yet to remove a 50,000-plus-ton pile of residue containing hazardous PCBs, an attorney for the business said Tuesday. Floyd L. Farano, attorney for Orange County Steel Salvage Inc., said the company cannot get rid of the residue of shredded automobiles, because most dumps won't take junk containing PCBs, which have the potential to cause cancer and other diseases.
SPORTS
July 3, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
If politics make strange bedfellows, so does the law. In his final years as baseball commissioner, Bud Selig has devoted enormous amounts of time and energy toward ridding his sport of steroids. Selig has another battle on his hands now. The city of San Jose has sued Major League Baseball , challenging the sport's cherished antitrust exemption in an effort to become the new home of the Oakland Athletics. In an indication of how seriously MLB takes this matter, the league put out a news release Wednesday, announcing it had hired prominent San Francisco attorney John Keker as its lead counsel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1997
The executive director of the National Cattleman's Beef Assn. (letter, April 9), in commenting on the ban of American beef for European consumption, expounds on the virtues of the Beef Quality Assurance Program, created to assure that beef bought by consumers is residue-free and exceeds standards set by the USDA. I think he dissimulates if he suggests that residue-free beef is readily available to the public. Residue-free beef is available in very small quantities and is not available at any of our major stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993
I wish to applaud your editorial. We nonsmokers finally have some concrete evidence we can throw in smokers' faces when they start squawking about their rights. I should not have to be exposed to secondhand cigarette smoke, which is nothing more then the residue of someone's pleasure. Releasing a carcinogen into the air that others must breathe is like putting arsenic in the public water supply. PETER VARGA Los Angeles
NEWS
June 15, 1989
The state Department of Health Services will hold a community meeting in Atwater tonight to provide information on the ongoing removal of asbestos and lead residue from the site of the Franciscan Ceramics plant. High levels of cancer-causing asbestos were found in December at several locations on the sprawling, 45-acre ceramics factory site at 2901 Los Feliz Blvd. Previously, state health officials had found lead residue at the site from decades of ceramics manufacturing. Since then, officials at Schurgin Development Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1989
Six people who complained of respiratory problems after breathing fumes from a titanium residue fire in Cerritos Tuesday were hospitalized for observation, officials said. Two 55-gallon drums filled with titanium shavings caught fire about 11:20 a.m. at the Titanium Sales Co. offices in the 15000 block of La Pluma Avenue, said Los Angeles County firefighter Dan Brock. Titanium is a metal that emits lung-irritating hydrogen chloride gas when it burns, said County Fire Inspector John Lenihan.
NEWS
November 13, 1986 | From Associated Press
Rotund actor Roger Carmel, who appeared in hundreds of movies and television shows, including his recurring role as Harry Mudd on "Star Trek," died of an apparent drug overdose, police said today. Carmel, 53, was found dead in bed in his Hollywood Boulevard condominium Tuesday evening, police Lt. Ed Hocking said. The body was discovered by the building manager after friends said they hadn't seen him for several days.
OPINION
July 8, 2001
Re "Is Spenser Still for Hire?" Commentary, July 1: Having taught and coached high school youth for 29 years, I can say to John Balzar that many are still for hire--and willing at the same time--to set an example for the kids. Like Balzar, I have read almost all of Robert B. Parker's Spenser novels as well as John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee series for the relaxation, escapism and succinct philosophical aphorisms put in a variety of creative contexts. Fortunately, my bottom line is not dependent upon deceiving myself and others, as Balzar discusses, but rather on living and teaching such maxims as the ones found in "Potshot."
BUSINESS
October 5, 2012 | Bloomberg News
American Airlines aircraft seats that dislodged in flight, temporarily grounding 48 Boeing Co. 757s, had already had been under scrutiny by the carrier for becoming loose more often than on other aircraft. The airline initially blamed incorrectly installed saddle clamps before determining that a buildup of residue from spilled sodas, coffee and juice kept locking pins from remaining in place, David Campbell, American's vice president for safety, security and environmental, said Friday.
SCIENCE
August 3, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Archaeologists have found residues of cacao -- or chocolate -- on 2,500-year-old plate fragments from the Northern Maya Lowlands in Yucatan, Mexico. Although cacao residue has been found in cups from other sites that are 1,000 years older, this is the oldest trace of cacao in this northern region. Perhaps more important, it is the first evidence that the Maya used cacao for anything other than as a drink. The presence of cacao on a plate suggests that it was used as a spice or sauce for food.
SCIENCE
March 8, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The levels of radioactive plutonium around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant aren't much higher than the amount of plutonium remaining in the environment from Cold War-era nuclear weapons tests, and it probably poses little threat to humans, a new study indicates. The paper, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, examines the area within a roughly 20-mile radius of the stricken plant and details the concentration of plutonium isotopes deposited there after explosions ripped open multiple reactors.
OPINION
September 22, 2011
Under an agreement between Iraq and the George W. Bush administration, virtually all U.S. troops are to be out of that country by the end of the year. But the Obama administration, and apparently the Iraqi government, favor maintaining a residual force. To which our response is: "Yes … but. " After this country's long slog through a bloody and unnecessary war, one that has cost 4,474 American lives, the idea of prolonging any U.S. presence is extremely unappealing. But if the military deems this absolutely essential, then so long as the force were kept small — 5,000 or so — it might be acceptable as a way of shoring up Iraqi security forces and continuing training operations.
SPORTS
April 20, 2011 | Helene Elliott
It was like a dream where something awful is happening but you're powerless to stop it — except the Kings were wide awake for their public undressing Tuesday at Staples Center. Boosted by a raucous crowd they had taken a 3-0 lead over the San Jose Sharks in the first period and appeared poised to take control of the teams' first-round playoff series. Their rout seemed assured when Sharks goaltender Antti Niemi lost his stick and was helpless to prevent Brad Richardson's unassisted goal 44 seconds into the second period.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
After less than three weeks of talks, the Writers Guild of America and Hollywood's major studios have reached an agreement on a new three-year contract. The tentative agreement includes a 20% increase in pay-TV residuals, a 2% increase in annual wage rates and an increase in employer pension contributions to 7.5% from 6%, according a letter the WGA sent to its 12,000 members Sunday night. Negotiations to replace the current contract, which expires May 1, began March 3. The swift agreement was widely anticipated and stood in sharp contrast to the bitter standoff that occurred in late 2007, after negotiations with the studios broke down and writers staged a 100-day strike that shut down television production and roiled Hollywood.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA
It started out as a wonder chemical, ended up as an albatross and will soon fade completely from the barns and orchards of America. Before this month is over, daminozide--trade-name Alar--will be banned from use on all foods. Four months after the Alar controversy erupted, Uniroyal Chemical Co. announced that it would no longer sell its controversial growth regulator in this country. But while Alar could no longer be purchased, it was still legal to use the chemical because the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2001
"Biotech Bears Fruit for Farmers, Not Consumers" [April 8] drastically understates the benefits of today's biotech products and the promise for tomorrow. Crops developed through biotechnology are dramatically reducing the amount of pesticides sprayed on crops. If America's farmers are not spraying millions of pounds of synthetic chemicals, that means there is less of those chemicals in the environment and used to produce the food we buy--which is a very real and profound benefit for consumers.
SPORTS
August 22, 2010 | Thomas Bonk
He has a 3.8 grade-point average, his field of study is architectural design and his favorite architect is Frank Lloyd Wright, so you have to figure that if the need came up in the huddle, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck would have no problem drawing up something that works. On the sideline, Cardinal Coach Jim Harbaugh knows that the shortest distance between the line of scrimmage and the end zone is often the straight line the football takes once it leaves Luck's hand and finds a receiver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Two Chino Hills brothers found shot to death near their home July 27 both died from self-inflicted gunshot wounds, according to investigators with the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. Homicide investigators almost immediately suspected that the shooting deaths of Bryan Gonzalez, 12, and his brother, Christian, 10, could have been the result of a suicide pact, but authorities said the details of what led to their deaths might never be known. Medical examiners from the county coroner's office found gunshot residue on the hands of both boys.
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