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HEALTH
February 13, 2011
How much strength training is enough to build muscles and garner some health benefits? Kent Adams, director of the exercise physiology lab at Cal State Monterey Bay, says most healthy people can follow the basic guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine, which recommends doing eight to 12 repetitions of eight to 10 strength-training exercises twice a week. (That's in addition to doing moderately intense cardio workouts for 30 minutes a day, five days a week.) But how can you tell whether you're using enough weight to build muscle?
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HEALTH
February 13, 2012 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actor Jesse Eisenberg's character in the movie "Zombieland"extolled the virtues of "cardio" as an apocalyptic survival tool. It probably didn't cross his mind it was making him a more scrumptious target for the walking dead. All supposing a better-functioning brain is also a tastier one, that is. A growing body of evidence shows that regular exercise - be it resistance training or aerobic - helps ward off a host of cognitive impairments and enhances brainpower all life long. "It's a medium-sized effect - but since we're talking about the brain, medium is good," says Michelle Voss, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Iowa and lead author on a 2011 review of the effect of exercise on cognition.
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NEWS
November 22, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Most savvy exercisers know that a combination of aerobic and resistance training is best, since one works the cardiovascular system and the other targets muscles and bones. A new study looks even deeper into the two workout methods, finding that both have distinct benefits for the heart and vascular system. The small study focused on 10 healthy men, average age about 25, who performed 30-minute bouts of cycling as well as eight resistance training exercises. The participants were monitored to see how their blood vessels responded to the different forms of exercise.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A six-month program of Tai Chi exercises helped people with various stages of Parkinson's disease improve stability, their ability to walk and reduced the frequency of falls. A study released this week in the New England Journal of Medicine compared a six-month tailored Tai Chi program to resistance training and stretching to see which was most effective at improving functional movement, walking and balance for Parkinson's patients. Researchers randomly assigned 195 men and women ages 40 to 85 who were in stages one to four of Parkinson's disease (on a scale of one to five)
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Yet more support for the combination of aerobic and resistance training exercise: A new study released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. finds that combining the two was good for blood sugar levels in people with Type 2 diabetes, more than those who did not exercise or who did just aerobics or resistance training. The study participants were made up of 262 sedentary men and women who had Type 2 diabetes and hemoglobin A1C levels of at least 6.5%. A1C levels are a measure of blood glucose over a two- to three-month period, and 4% to 6% is considered a normal range.
HEALTH
February 5, 2001 | KAREN VOIGHT
Let's face it--our muscles look and feel much better when we exercise them, and one of the fastest and most effective ways to condition them is to use resistance training. This means that when you gradually use your muscles to lift a little more weight than they are accustomed to (but not more than they can handle), your body gets stronger. After only a few weeks of doing weightlifting exercises regularly, you'll be able to easily lift and carry things that used to feel heavy.
HEALTH
January 10, 2011 | James S. Fell, Fell is a certified strength and conditioning specialist in Calgary, Canada.
My son is 12 years old, and he's going through a lot of changes in his life, most of which he'd rather not see published in this column. However, there is one change I have permission to relay: He's started lifting weights under my supervision. I can already hear the protestations of physicians and parents. "Blasphemy!" they cry. "It's not safe!" Many of them believe that weight training should wait until the end of puberty because it can cause serious, growth-stunting injury.
HEALTH
November 15, 2004 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Weight training has gained attention in recent years as a way to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. Now experts say that this type of exercise is crucial for everyone -- the young, the elderly and everyone in between. In issuing updated, broad exercise guidelines for children and adults, the American College of Sports Medicine emphasized not just the benefits of cardiovascular exercise but the advantages of often-overlooked resistance training as well.
HEALTH
February 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Strength training has strong-armed its way beyond the realm of bodybuilding. A growing body of research shows that working out with weights has health benefits beyond simply bulking up one's muscles and strengthening bones. Studies are finding that more lean muscle mass may allow kidney dialysis patients to live longer, give older people better cognitive function, reduce depression, boost good cholesterol, lessen the swelling and discomfort of lymphedema after breast cancer and help lower the risk of diabetes.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Smokers may have another tool to use in the battle to stop puffing: resistance training. A pilot study found that men and women who did several weeks of strength training had better quit rates than those who watched health and wellness videos. Researchers tracked the progress of 25 male and female smokers, all of whom received nicotine patches and a counseling session on how to stop smoking. They were then randomly split into two groups--one did three months of resistance training, and the other watched twice-weekly videos on health-related topics.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Smokers may have another tool to use in the battle to stop puffing: resistance training. A pilot study found that men and women who did several weeks of strength training had better quit rates than those who watched health and wellness videos. Researchers tracked the progress of 25 male and female smokers, all of whom received nicotine patches and a counseling session on how to stop smoking. They were then randomly split into two groups--one did three months of resistance training, and the other watched twice-weekly videos on health-related topics.
HEALTH
February 13, 2011
How much strength training is enough to build muscles and garner some health benefits? Kent Adams, director of the exercise physiology lab at Cal State Monterey Bay, says most healthy people can follow the basic guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine, which recommends doing eight to 12 repetitions of eight to 10 strength-training exercises twice a week. (That's in addition to doing moderately intense cardio workouts for 30 minutes a day, five days a week.) But how can you tell whether you're using enough weight to build muscle?
HEALTH
February 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Strength training has strong-armed its way beyond the realm of bodybuilding. A growing body of research shows that working out with weights has health benefits beyond simply bulking up one's muscles and strengthening bones. Studies are finding that more lean muscle mass may allow kidney dialysis patients to live longer, give older people better cognitive function, reduce depression, boost good cholesterol, lessen the swelling and discomfort of lymphedema after breast cancer and help lower the risk of diabetes.
HEALTH
January 10, 2011 | James S. Fell, Fell is a certified strength and conditioning specialist in Calgary, Canada.
My son is 12 years old, and he's going through a lot of changes in his life, most of which he'd rather not see published in this column. However, there is one change I have permission to relay: He's started lifting weights under my supervision. I can already hear the protestations of physicians and parents. "Blasphemy!" they cry. "It's not safe!" Many of them believe that weight training should wait until the end of puberty because it can cause serious, growth-stunting injury.
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Yet more support for the combination of aerobic and resistance training exercise: A new study released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. finds that combining the two was good for blood sugar levels in people with Type 2 diabetes, more than those who did not exercise or who did just aerobics or resistance training. The study participants were made up of 262 sedentary men and women who had Type 2 diabetes and hemoglobin A1C levels of at least 6.5%. A1C levels are a measure of blood glucose over a two- to three-month period, and 4% to 6% is considered a normal range.
NEWS
November 22, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Most savvy exercisers know that a combination of aerobic and resistance training is best, since one works the cardiovascular system and the other targets muscles and bones. A new study looks even deeper into the two workout methods, finding that both have distinct benefits for the heart and vascular system. The small study focused on 10 healthy men, average age about 25, who performed 30-minute bouts of cycling as well as eight resistance training exercises. The participants were monitored to see how their blood vessels responded to the different forms of exercise.
HEALTH
May 8, 2000 | CAROL KRUCOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In today's weight room, you're as likely to see a grandmother working her glutes as a quarterback working his quads, now that resistance exercise is recognized as vital to building strong muscles and bones. But the American Heart Assn. says pumping iron is also good for that most important of muscles--the heart.
HEALTH
November 28, 2005 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to dodging weight gain, high blood pressure and diabetes, most of us go for the cardio, trudging on the treadmill or easing into the elliptical trainer to slim down and get healthy. But aerobic activities aren't the only workouts that help stave off these problems, it turns out.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
You're going for one last set of bench presses, but fatigue is setting in. Do you reach for a sports drink? Look to your trainer for motivation? A new study suggests you may want to cool your palms. Cooling muscles between weight-lifting sets has shown in some studies to be helpful in tamping down muscle fatigue. But researchers wanted to know if similar results could be achieved by cooling an area that doesn't include active muscles -- the palms. The study included 16 men in good health who had been involved in regular, intense weight training for at least five years.
HEALTH
May 11, 2009 | Karen Voight
If you travel and need a convenient way to exercise without packing dumbbells, exercise tubing is an excellent alternative for creating resistance. With this one move, you'll be able to train multiple muscles in your upper and lower body at the same time. -- Karen Voight 1 Grasp the handles at each end of the rubber tubing. Place your feet on the tubing as an anchor. Be sure your feet are shoulder-width apart, toes pointing forward, feet parallel to each other. Lower your arms by your sides.
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