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NEWS
February 22, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He owns baseball's Florida Marlins. He owns the Florida Panthers, the hockey team. He just agreed to buy the Miami Dolphins for $138 million. He runs Blockbuster Entertainment Corp., and he's moving big time into television and films. Now he wants to build a virtual city on the edge of the Everglades, a self-governing, 2,300-acre sports and entertainment complex jammed with major league stadiums, a movie studio, an amusement park and golf courses.
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NEWS
March 22, 1998 | DONALD P. BAKER, WASHINGTON POST
For a quarter of a century after Connie Francis crooned "Where the Boys Are" in a 1960 movie set in this resort city, civic boosters capitalized on the fame to make Fort Lauderdale the nation's spring break capital. But this spring, the boys romping on the sandy beaches here and filling the bars and restaurants are more likely to be homosexual couples than college students.
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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | TRACY FIELDS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This mile-long strip of sand flourished during the Jim Crow era, when blacks weren't welcome at the ritzy white-only resorts along Florida's Atlantic coastline. It has gone into decline since segregation ended, but the few remaining residents are fighting to preserve it and keep it safe from the hungry eye of developers. "They deserted this place," said William Watson, a retired teacher who bought a lot in American Beach for $2,400 in 1976 and is one of the 30 people who live here year-round.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He owns baseball's Florida Marlins. He owns the Florida Panthers, the hockey team. He just agreed to buy the Miami Dolphins for $138 million. He runs Blockbuster Entertainment Corp., and he's moving big time into television and films. Now he wants to build a virtual city on the edge of the Everglades, a self-governing, 2,300-acre sports and entertainment complex jammed with major league stadiums, a movie studio, an amusement park and golf courses.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | DONALD P. BAKER, WASHINGTON POST
For a quarter of a century after Connie Francis crooned "Where the Boys Are" in a 1960 movie set in this resort city, civic boosters capitalized on the fame to make Fort Lauderdale the nation's spring break capital. But this spring, the boys romping on the sandy beaches here and filling the bars and restaurants are more likely to be homosexual couples than college students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN
A fire that destroyed a Camarillo barn owned by the Ventura County Boy Scouts Council was caused by arson, investigators said Tuesday. The fire Monday night gutted the barn used as a Boy Scouts storage facility and destroyed $50,000 worth of furnishings and equipment, including about 20 items intended for a Dec. 4 auction. No injuries were reported in the fire at 509 E. Daily Drive.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2002
* Boeing Co., hurt by a slowdown in the market for commercial satellites, said it has begun a second round of job cuts at its satellite-making unit in El Segundo, slashing 800 positions on top of the 1,050 that it had announced in February. The unit warned employees that it would have to eliminate an additional 500 jobs by year-end if market conditions don't improve. That would bring the total number of job cuts to 2,350, or about 25% of Boeing's satellite work force. * Boeing Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000 | STEVE HARVEY
An employee in a Paramount city building gazed out his window and spotted two men breaking into a car across the street. Two detectives arrived promptly and arrested the alleged crooks. The latter demanded to know who had snitched on them, according to City Talk, Paramount's newsletter. The deputies pointed across the street to the employee's place of business--a Sheriff's Department substation whose parking lot was filled with black-and-whites. "Duh!" concluded the newsletter.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judson C. Green, a 19-year veteran of Walt Disney Co. and chairman of its thriving theme parks and resorts, became the latest executive in a long string of top managers in recent years to quit the Burbank company. Both Disney and Green's new company, Navigation Technologies Corp., said Monday that Green will become president and chief executive of the Chicago maker of digital maps for auto navigation systems, effective May 8.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judson C. Green, a 19-year veteran of Walt Disney Co. and chairman of its thriving theme parks and resorts, became the latest executive in a long string of top managers in recent years to quit the Burbank company. Both Disney and Green's new company, Navigation Technologies Corp., said Monday that Green will become president and chief executive of the Chicago maker of digital maps for auto navigation systems, effective May 8.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | TRACY FIELDS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This mile-long strip of sand flourished during the Jim Crow era, when blacks weren't welcome at the ritzy white-only resorts along Florida's Atlantic coastline. It has gone into decline since segregation ended, but the few remaining residents are fighting to preserve it and keep it safe from the hungry eye of developers. "They deserted this place," said William Watson, a retired teacher who bought a lot in American Beach for $2,400 in 1976 and is one of the 30 people who live here year-round.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2005 | Times staff
After a week of crises affecting travel to the Caribbean and areas of the U.S. as well as London, airlines and cruise lines adjusted policies, and tropical resorts cleaned up storm damage and braced for more. Hurricane Dennis, later downgraded to a tropical depression, last week disrupted flights in the Caribbean and the southern U.S. Days earlier, terrorist bombings claimed dozens of lives on London transit. Vacationers seemed resilient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000 | STEVE HARVEY
An employee in a Paramount city building gazed out his window and spotted two men breaking into a car across the street. Two detectives arrived promptly and arrested the alleged crooks. The latter demanded to know who had snitched on them, according to City Talk, Paramount's newsletter. The deputies pointed across the street to the public-minded employee's place of business--a Sheriff's Department substation whose parking lot was filled with black and whites. "Duh!" concluded the newsletter.
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