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June 5, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For almost a century, the salt-sprayed headlands of the bucolic Central Coast north of Cambria have escaped the tide of development that has washed over much of the state's Pacific shores. The era of rural tranquillity may have come to an official end this week, however, with a sweeping decision by the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors to relax growth controls, paving the way for commercial and residential construction on 2,000 acres of coastal hills and meadows.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Setting the stage for a political battle royal over the future of one of California's most breathtaking coastal landscapes, the staff of the state's Coastal Commission on Wednesday recommended denial of the Hearst Corp.'s proposal to build a sprawling resort complex on the headlands north of San Simeon. With the blessing of the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors, the Hearst Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Setting the stage for a political battle royal over the future of one of California's most breathtaking coastal landscapes, the staff of the state's Coastal Commission on Wednesday recommended denial of the Hearst Corp.'s proposal to build a sprawling resort complex on the headlands north of San Simeon. With the blessing of the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors, the Hearst Corp.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For almost a century, the salt-sprayed headlands of the bucolic Central Coast north of Cambria have escaped the tide of development that has washed over much of the state's Pacific shores. The era of rural tranquillity may have come to an official end this week, however, with a sweeping decision by the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors to relax growth controls, paving the way for commercial and residential construction on 2,000 acres of coastal hills and meadows.
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