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Resorts Orange County

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NEWS
July 22, 1997 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been years since the warm waters of La Vida Hot Springs bubbled up unfettered from an underground source. The gracious old hotel where generations of weekend escapees from Los Angeles once lounged is boarded up and crumbling. But now, the site of the caressing waters that were first tapped by wayward oil drilling in 1893 has been bought by a Japanese investor with a love of mineral baths and massage. And hope springs that La Vida, which means "the life" in Spanish, may open again.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 2009 | E. Scott Reckard and Roger Vincent
On a sultry midweek afternoon at the grand new Resort at Pelican Hill, a scant dozen vacationers lounged at what is billed as the world's largest circular pool, flanked on one side by a Coliseum-style amphitheater and on the other by an ocean-view golf course. A few miles south in Laguna Beach, most of the 170 lounge chairs at the Montage resort's oceanfront pool were empty as the afternoon wore on. Cocktail hour arrived, but at 5:45 p.m. only a single table at the poolside Mosaic Bar & Grille was occupied.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1993 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy years ago it made sense, at least on paper. Build a thriving resort community along the pristine coastal bluffs halfway between San Diego and Los Angeles and they will come. Today in Dana Point, however, only part of the promise has come true. This coastal community named for 19th-Century explorer and author Richard Henry Dana has nationally known hotels and a bustling harbor that attracts thousands of tourists every week.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betting on an old-line city in a slowing economy, the owner of the Waterfront Hilton Beach Resort in Huntington Beach said Monday that it has started construction next door on a 519-room resort that would be one of Orange County's 10 largest hotels. The Robert Mayer Corp., in conjunction with Hyatt Corp., also said it landed permanent financing for what will be called the Hyatt Regency Grand Coast Resort, which would dwarf the 290-room Hilton. Stephen K.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD and CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Members of the pricey Marbella Golf and Country Club were meeting anxiously Wednesday to learn more about the sudden bankruptcy reorganization filing by one of Orange County's most prestigious golf course resorts. The country club, which charged inaugural members nearly $30,000 to sign up but relieved them of the burden of monthly dues, filed for Chapter 11 protection from creditors Monday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Santa Ana.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state's signing of a controversial contract Tuesday paves the way for creating what the agreement calls a "first-class vintage California beach resort" at Crystal Cove State Park between Newport Beach and Laguna Beach. A portion of one of Orange County's most peaceful and scenic stretches of public coastline would be leased to a private developer for up to 60 years, making it the longest concession contract in the state parks system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2000 | By Kenneth Ma, (949) 248-2157
The Planning Commission and Design Review Board are scheduled Wednesday to consider final tweaks to specifications on the $150-million Treasure Island resort complex project in South Laguna. Commissioners will consider a proposed subdivision map to establish spaces and boundaries for the hotel, condominiums and homes as well as a plan to build a wall between the mainland and Goff Island. Both modifications are the last in a series of changes to the resort's development plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2000 | KENNETH MA and DAVID HALDANE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial plan to build a $150-million resort complex in South Laguna has cleared a major hurdle, winning City Council approval of design details for the development. "This was a very significant step forward," Laguna Beach City Manager Kenneth C. Frank said Wednesday of the council's action late Tuesday. The Treasure Island resort, he said, "is the most significant project in Laguna Beach in the last 20 years, and I think we're nearing the end."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday agreed to scrutinize a controversial luxury resort proposed for a seaside stretch of Laguna Beach known as Treasure Island. The five-star hotel and residential project on one of the last stretches of relatively undeveloped Laguna Beach coastline already has been approved by the city. Local activists took their fight to the commission--a powerful state agency that can, and has, trumped local decisions elsewhere on California's coast.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co. could reap millions of dollars in tax benefits for its proposed Disneyland Resort project under legislation pending in the Assembly. The bill would grant tax breaks to companies that undertake major expansions. And it would give even bigger breaks--75%--to those that build roads and parks or make other public improvements as part of their projects. Disney is deciding whether to proceed with the $3-billion theme park and hotel project in Anaheim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2001 | STAN ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of the historic Crystal Cove State Park cottages on Monday began receiving long-dreaded eviction notices from the state Department of Parks. The certified letters to the 39 remaining residents of the beachfront homes were "short and sweet," said Jim Thobe, 75, a resident for 31 years. He and the others are being asked to leave within 30 days of receiving the notice. But Thobe said he's not packing just yet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Coastal Commission's staff recommended Thursday that the agency approve a controversial luxury resort and residential project on one of the last relatively undeveloped seaside stretches in Laguna Beach--with 10 conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday agreed to scrutinize a controversial luxury resort proposed for a seaside stretch of Laguna Beach known as Treasure Island. The five-star hotel and residential project on one of the last stretches of relatively undeveloped Laguna Beach coastline already has been approved by the city. Local activists took their fight to the commission--a powerful state agency that can, and has, trumped local decisions elsewhere on California's coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
The Planning Commission and Design Review Board postponed a decision on Treasure Island's tentative tract map Wednesday night, sending the proposal back to the developer for clarification. The committees will vote Feb. 16 on the proposed 30-acre resort, located in South Laguna, which is being developed by the Phoenix-based Athens Group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2000 | KENNETH MA and DAVID HALDANE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial plan to build a $150-million resort complex in South Laguna has cleared a major hurdle, winning City Council approval of design details for the development. "This was a very significant step forward," Laguna Beach City Manager Kenneth C. Frank said Wednesday of the council's action late Tuesday. The Treasure Island resort, he said, "is the most significant project in Laguna Beach in the last 20 years, and I think we're nearing the end."
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breakers toss salt into the breeze as a beachcomber eyes a tide pool. A skim-boarder shoots skyward, then plunges into the foam. On this warm fall day, in a Laguna Beach cove with surf-sculpted rock arches and bougainvillea-draped bluffs, just two sunbathers share the sand with the darting seabirds. In the past, the few visitors here mostly scrambled down from Treasure Island, a bluff-top trailer park looking out to Santa Catalina Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising from the heart of Paris, the underground metro A4 line breaks into sunlight just west of Vincennes, as the urban sprawl gives way to green soccer fields and small villages. In short order, a billboard featuring Mickey and Minnie Mouse appears among hamburger and clothing advertisements, the first clue to what lies at the end of the line.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breakers toss salt into the breeze as a beachcomber eyes a tide pool. A skim-boarder shoots skyward, then plunges into the foam. On this warm fall day, in a Laguna Beach cove with surf-sculpted rock arches and bougainvillea-draped bluffs, just two sunbathers share the sand with the darting seabirds. In the past, the few visitors here mostly scrambled down from Treasure Island, a bluff-top trailer park looking out to Santa Catalina Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before residents were evicted and mobile homes were abandoned in favor of more grandiose plans, Lucy and Desi found Treasure Island. America's first sitcom couple filmed their 1954 movie, "The Long, Long Trailer," inside the white and green coach parked on spot 113 of the South Laguna mobile home park. The trailer, like the rest of Treasure Island, is empty now.
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