Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsResorts Texas
IN THE NEWS

Resorts Texas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They cross the border in convoys of Suburbans and Silverados, fair-skinned and light-eyed migrants. They carry gold cards with their Mexican passports, wear Rolexes with their Speedos. On the island, they eat $29.95 lamb chops at the Grill Room, buy $125 Italian shirts at Tate's, drink top-shelf whiskey at Tequila Frog's, share their prayers and prosperity with Our Lady Star of the Sea Catholic Church. They are los regios, the regal ones, the elite of Monterrey.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They cross the border in convoys of Suburbans and Silverados, fair-skinned and light-eyed migrants. They carry gold cards with their Mexican passports, wear Rolexes with their Speedos. On the island, they eat $29.95 lamb chops at the Grill Room, buy $125 Italian shirts at Tate's, drink top-shelf whiskey at Tequila Frog's, share their prayers and prosperity with Our Lady Star of the Sea Catholic Church. They are los regios, the regal ones, the elite of Monterrey.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2000 | ANN CONWAY
Trading sensible volunteer aprons for fashionable luncheon attire, members of the Assistance League of Newport-Mesa marked 60 years of community service during a gala benefit at the Newport Marriott Hotel and Tennis Club. More than 500 members dined on chicken Forestiere and mingled with special guest Julie Nixon Eisenhower, who came from Pennsylvania to speak at the Diamond Jubilee celebration.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1993 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the palm-lined fairways and blue-green lakes scattered across the fabled PGA West and Mission Hills golf courses near Palm Springs appear to be tranquil oases far removed from financial turbulence or uncertainty. In fact, the future of the two country clubs is very much up for grabs these days as nearly 2,000 of their well-heeled members scramble to buy the resorts and keep them out of the hands of several big-name suitors--including Ross Perot Jr.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jamul Indians may be one of the state's smallest tribes, but they have big plans for a tiny six-acre reservation in the dry, brush-covered hills of eastern San Diego County. In the next year, the 56-member tribe plans to build a multistory casino on four acres of its reservation land.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|