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NEWS
August 18, 1989
The emphysema and bronchitis death rate among Americans is up by a third since 1979, with the highest rates in the West, and 4 out of 5 such deaths are caused by smoking, the national Centers for Disease Control said in Atlanta. The CDC said 71,099 Americans died of the diseases in 1986, the latest year for which complete statistics are available. The toll does not include lung cancer deaths. Although men's death rates remained higher than women's, the rate for women was catching up.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
CALEXICO, CALIF. - As the relentless wind stirs up piles of dust and dirt and creates a gigantic funnel of haze in the vast, sweltering Imperial Valley, children like Marco Cisneros battle to breathe. Marco wheezes and coughs and reaches desperately for his inhaler, but the medication doesn't always give him the relief he needs. Often, his mother has to call 911. Since being diagnosed with severe asthma six years ago, Marco, who lives in this border town east of San Diego, has visited the hospital nearly 50 times.
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SCIENCE
November 16, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
A virulent new form of a common cold virus has killed 10 people and hospitalized at least 53 since May 2006, the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. The adenovirus serotype 14 virus has sickened more than 360 people in Texas, Oregon, Washington and New York, the report said. One of the largest outbreaks occurred at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, where 106 soldiers were infected and one died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Sir John Crofton, a physician who is credited with saving millions of lives by pioneering the use of cocktails of antibiotics to treat tuberculosis -- a concept that has subsequently been applied to treating a variety of other diseases, particularly cancer and AIDS -- died Nov. 3 at his home in Edinburgh, Scotland. He was 97. A specialist in diseases of the lungs, Crofton later turned his attention to battling smoking at home in Scotland and around the world, co-founding ASH-UK (Action on Smoking and Health)
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diarrhea and respiratory diseases such as pneumonia killed 7.5 million children last year, but child deaths in the Third World could be slashed through simple treatment, the World Health Organization said. Director General Hiroshi Nakajima said diarrhea deaths could be cut by half over 10 years, mainly by treatment with oral rehydration salts. Pneumonia fatalities could be reduced by a third through use of oral antibiotics. Both treatments cost less than 50 cents per person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Sir John Crofton, a physician who is credited with saving millions of lives by pioneering the use of cocktails of antibiotics to treat tuberculosis -- a concept that has subsequently been applied to treating a variety of other diseases, particularly cancer and AIDS -- died Nov. 3 at his home in Edinburgh, Scotland. He was 97. A specialist in diseases of the lungs, Crofton later turned his attention to battling smoking at home in Scotland and around the world, co-founding ASH-UK (Action on Smoking and Health)
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 80,000 men and women who battle the nation's wildfires have always known their lives were endangered by flames or heat or falling debris. But now, two new studies show they also face an unseen hazard: Their health is under siege from the poisonous stew of gases and soot in wildfire smoke.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Puppeteer Jim Henson's sudden death of pneumonia last week is a reminder that this usually benign disease, which strikes about 3 million Americans each year, can be fatal. Generally, pneumonia is well understood by doctors and is easily treated with a variety of antibiotics, said Dr. Bisher Akil, an expert in infectious diseases and pulmonary medicine at the University of Southern California. "You get simple outpatient treatment with antibiotics and you get over it," Akil said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN
A 29-year-old woman battling a rare autoimmune disease is hoping to become the first patient in the country with the ailment to receive a double lung transplant following unsuccessful surgery last week to help her breathe. Shelley Ybarra of Rancho Santa Margarita suffers from Wegener's granulomatosis, a tissue disease that has collapsed about 70% of her lungs.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Greenstein had reached the point that he didn't care if he died on the operating table. Emphysema, the cruel wages of a 40-year, two-pack-a-day smoking habit, made him feel as though he were drowning--very slowly. Tethered to an oxygen tank and wheelchair-bound, the 62-year-old West Palm Beach, Fla., resident couldn't perform life's most basic tasks. His wife had to shower him, shampoo his hair and rub him dry because he lacked the stamina. Even talking tired the former auctioneer.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Federal officials said Wednesday that they have noticed "a worrisome spike in serious pneumococcal disease" linked to pandemic H1N1 influenza. Health authorities normally see an increase in such infections associated with seasonal flu, but this year the rate is substantially higher than normal and striking younger people rather than the elderly, according to Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center...
SCIENCE
November 16, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
A virulent new form of a common cold virus has killed 10 people and hospitalized at least 53 since May 2006, the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. The adenovirus serotype 14 virus has sickened more than 360 people in Texas, Oregon, Washington and New York, the report said. One of the largest outbreaks occurred at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, where 106 soldiers were infected and one died.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steroids used to reduce inflammation in the lung do not prolong the survival of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS, researchers reported Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Life-threatening ARDS affects about 150,000 people each year in the U.S. Researchers have assumed that giving steroids to reduce inflammation is beneficial, and that has become the standard of care.
SPORTS
December 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
NFL great Reggie White may have died because of a respiratory disease combined with other health problems, a preliminary autopsy report said Monday. White most likely had a condition that affected the amount of air his lungs could hold, resulting in "fatal cardiac arrhythmia" -- irregular heartbeat -- said Mike Sullivan, the medical examiner for Mecklenburg County. The report issued by Sullivan's office also said sleep apnea may have been a factor.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2003 | Paul Elias, Associated Press
After years of disappointment, an elegantly simple medical technique that targets bad cells while leaving healthy ones alone could be making a comeback in the high-profile fight against cancer and the SARS virus. The technique, known as "antisense," aims to kill the genetic messenger carrying disease.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Health authorities have identified 14 "suspicious" cases of respiratory distress in the United States -- including one in Los Angeles -- that may be linked to a mysterious wave of infection emerging from Asia, but none of the cases has been definitively identified as the enigmatic illness, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may seem as if every fourth person at work has been out sick and half your holiday guests called with regrets, but don't blame the flu, health experts say. Many people have a variety of virus-driven colds, and some others are really suffering from the flu, but this isn't an unusually bad flu season so far. Especially compared with two years ago, when flu-ridden patients filled hospital beds and forced public health officials to declare an epidemic in the Southland.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration said it has approved a drug that company studies have shown can cut by 50% the death rate in premature infants suffering from a severe lung disease. The disease, called respiratory distress syndrome, is the most common cause of death in infants younger than 30 days, the American Lung Assn. said in New York. The drug, Exosurf, mimics the action of lung surfactant, a liquid that helps keep lungs inflated.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | DAVID GRAM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cindy Trahan's fight began four years ago when her daughter Jessica, a ninth-grader at North Country Union High School, collapsed at school, unable to breathe. Trahan got to the school in time to ride with her daughter in the ambulance to the hospital. "One of the guys in the back of the ambulance said, 'We're losing her,' " she recalled. "I said, 'No, you're not losing her, you're not losing my daughter.'
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