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Respiratory Diseases

NEWS
November 18, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new treatment can prevent the sometimes devastating effects of one of the most widespread respiratory diseases of childhood, researchers said Wednesday. Although virtually all children develop the illness by the age of 2, most have only cold-like symptoms. But significantly premature infants and those who have certain other childhood illnesses are especially susceptible to the effects of the ailment, which is caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something is in the air. What it is, Orange County physicians aren't entirely sure, but many suspect a lingering effect of the recent fires that swept through Orange County. The smoke from burning brush and homes, medical experts said Monday, spread a wide variety of irritating materials into autumn air already laden with allergy-triggering pollens. The warm Santa Ana winds have also dried respiratory tracts, increasing the chance of infection in people with bronchial problems.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The unexpected epidemic of a mysterious flu-like disease that struck the Southwest this summer was no surprise to virologists. For years they have warned that humanity's increasing encroachment on nature will eventually unleash on the United States and other developed nations exotic diseases previously confined to poverty-ridden Third World countries.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Two new deaths attributed to the mysterious "Four Corners disease" have been identified in Oregon and Louisiana, the latter ominously caused by a new strain of virus carried by a different rodent, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. The new cases suggest that the disease could exist elsewhere in the country and that much of the western and southern United States may be at risk.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The buzz around the visitors bureau Wednesday was a little off-key, a bit insistent. One tourist would ask how to catch trout, but the next would wonder how not to catch hantavirus. In the days since Jeanne Messier, a UC San Diego graduate student doing research at the Valentine Ecological Reserve here, died of a flu-like illness caused by hantavirus, the local ranger station of the U.S. Forest Service has received more than 500 phone calls from concerned visitors and prospective vacationers.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Describing the death of a UC San Diego graduate student from a mysterious flu-like illness as an isolated incident, health officials said Tuesday that no travel restrictions or quarantines will be placed on this resort area. Jeanne Messier, 27, died Friday after being infected with the hantavirus while working and living in the Mammoth area. The hantavirus is responsible for at least 17 deaths, mostly among American Indians, in the Four Corners area of the Southwest.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A graduate student who died last week in Mammoth Lakes and a Santa Barbara County ranch hand were infected with the deadly hantavirus--the same virus that caused a fatal outbreak in the Four Corners area of the Southwest earlier this year, state health officials announced late Monday. The two are the only confirmed cases of hantavirus infection in California, the sixth state where the disease has been identified since the illness was discovered among Navajos in New Mexico in May.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The house of a University of California researcher whose death may have been caused by the mysterious, rodent-linked hantavirus was not infested by mice despite earlier reports to that effect, a colleague said Sunday.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | DAVID FREED and MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A UC San Diego graduate student who worked and lived in a nature reserve here may have died as a result of a mystery flu-like illness suspected of killing 29 people in the Four Corners area of the desert Southwest, authorities said Saturday. State and federal medical experts began arriving Saturday in Mammoth Lakes in the Eastern Sierra to investigate whether Jeanne Messier, 27, was the first California case of the deadly disease. The U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The flu-like mystery illness that has plagued the Four Corners area of the Southwest is spreading outside the region, with new cases reported in Nevada and Texas, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. The disease, which has now been linked to a hantavirus carried by the deer mouse, also continues to show up in new cases in the Four Corners region, according to the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
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