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Respiratory Diseases

NEWS
June 5, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The mystery illness that has stricken the Four Corners area of New Mexico and Arizona may be caused by a virus carried by rodents and transmitted in rodent droppings and urine, New Mexico authorities said Friday.
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NEWS
June 4, 1993 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California health officials have investigated the unexplained deaths of two Humboldt State University undergraduates and a severe respiratory illness that struck a third student, but say they have found no link to an outbreak of a mysterious fatal disease in Arizona and New Mexico.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
New Mexico authorities said Monday that they have observed no new cases in the last 24 hours of the mystery illness that has brought fear to the Four Corners area of northern Arizona and New Mexico. But the death toll from the flu-like disease has risen to 11 as researchers have ferreted out an earlier case that matches criteria established for the disorder, now known as unexplained respiratory distress syndrome, or URDS. Researchers from New Mexico and the U.S.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Aaron Lee knows more about his bronchial tubes than most 11-year-olds. When he awakens at 3 a.m., struggling for breath in his Inglewood home, he gives himself a home breathing treatment--even though he sometimes falls back to sleep, spilling medicine on his pajamas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1992 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karen Stare can still recall how terrified she was 12 years ago after her first child was born prematurely with a life-threatening respiratory disease and placed on a then-radical support system. "She was this big," Stare said, gesturing about eight inches, "and all red. Both tubes were coming out of her neck. She was on a respirator and had an umbilical catheter. "She was such a fighter. . . . They had to pin her down with safety pins."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A widely available vaccine is about 60% effective in preventing common kinds of pneumonia and should be more widely administered to the elderly and other susceptible people, a study has found. The researchers said their work "provides compelling evidence" of the value of the vaccine, which has been on the market since 1977. Each year, about 2 million Americans catch pneumonia, and at least 40,000 of them die. It is the nation's most frequent lethal infection.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists here have developed an artificial lung substance that in animal tests prevented respiratory distress syndrome--a significant killer of adults and premature babies, according to a study published today in a scientific journal. Researchers have labored for years to develop a synthetic form of the substance, called surfactant. Each year about 39,000 premature babies are born without surfactant and develop respiratory distress syndrome, an inability to keep air sacs open in the lungs.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A team of researchers has stumbled upon what they and others say could be a partial explanation for the recent rise in asthma cases and deaths--a trend that epidemiologists have observed worldwide and have been at a loss to explain.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diarrhea and respiratory diseases such as pneumonia killed 7.5 million children last year, but child deaths in the Third World could be slashed through simple treatment, the World Health Organization said. Director General Hiroshi Nakajima said diarrhea deaths could be cut by half over 10 years, mainly by treatment with oral rehydration salts. Pneumonia fatalities could be reduced by a third through use of oral antibiotics. Both treatments cost less than 50 cents per person.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court, extending new protection to disabled workers, on Thursday let stand an appellate ruling requiring a smoke-free workplace for employees with respiratory ailments aggravated by tobacco smoke. The justices refused to hear a challenge to a far-reaching appellate court ruling that workers whose functions are impaired by tobacco smoke are "physically handicapped" and thus protected under the state Fair Employment and Housing Act.
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