Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRestaurant Equipment
IN THE NEWS

Restaurant Equipment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 1985
Investigators have determined that a fire in the Proud Bird restaurant, which claimed the life of a Los Angeles firefighter and caused $2 million damage, was set to cover the theft of restaurant equipment. Fire Department Capt. Tony DiDomenico said a large commercial refrigerator and a large freezer unit--both stainless steel and manufactured by Raetone-- were stolen, shortly before the blaze broke out in the early morning hours of Dec. 4, 1984.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
When food lovers head to Paris these days, the savvier bypass the Michelin-starred restaurants entirely and seek out the small, sometimes funky bistros where passionate young cooks are turning out wonderful food at affordable prices. Spaces - and kitchens - are often tiny, menus small and changeable. And the wine list may simply be a collection of bottles lined up on shelves. Many come from small or obscure producers who believe in natural (biodynamic, organic) winemaking. A copy of Alice Feiring's "Naked Wine" translated into French might be propped against a bottle of Chinon or Burgundy.
Advertisement
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
When food lovers head to Paris these days, the savvier bypass the Michelin-starred restaurants entirely and seek out the small, sometimes funky bistros where passionate young cooks are turning out wonderful food at affordable prices. Spaces - and kitchens - are often tiny, menus small and changeable. And the wine list may simply be a collection of bottles lined up on shelves. Many come from small or obscure producers who believe in natural (biodynamic, organic) winemaking. A copy of Alice Feiring's "Naked Wine" translated into French might be propped against a bottle of Chinon or Burgundy.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sluggish economy is taking its toll on restaurant sales, forcing business owners to look for ways to cut costs and hold on to the customers they have, according to suppliers and analysts attending the Western Foodservice & Hospitality Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Sunday. "People are hearing about the economy," said Bill Keldsen of Santa Monica Seafood, a fish retailer. "They're concerned. Restaurants are one of the first areas that gets cut back on."
BUSINESS
August 20, 1999
Marketing tips, new cooking technologies and cooking demonstrations will be among the offerings at the California Restaurant Assn. convention scheduled for Saturday at the Los Angeles Convention Center. More than 40,000 people are expected to attend and 1,300 exhibitors have booked space to show off products and services such as bulk foods and ingredients, new cooking devices, restaurant equipment and accessories.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS
Carol Krug worked late two weeks ago, until 2 a.m., cleaning up after a Sunday-night staff party at Bob Burns restaurant in Woodland Hills. She needn't have bothered. Two-and-a-half hours later, toppled restaurant equipment, broken glass and shattered china were strewn everywhere, the result of the 6.6-magnitude earthquake. "This is a big restaurant and we had a big mess," says Krug, who is general manager of Bob Burns. "Just about everything broke."
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
As if fewer customers and increased competition weren't enough problems, restaurant operators in Southern California have another headache looming: smog control. The Air Quality Management District, seeking to reduce so-called stationary (non-automotive) sources of air pollution, is thinking of imposing stringent controls on charbroilers. Such a move would require that restaurants with such broilers obtain permits and install filters to reduce smoke and ash.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sluggish economy is taking its toll on restaurant sales, forcing business owners to look for ways to cut costs and hold on to the customers they have, according to suppliers and analysts attending the Western Foodservice & Hospitality Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Sunday. "People are hearing about the economy," said Bill Keldsen of Santa Monica Seafood, a fish retailer. "They're concerned. Restaurants are one of the first areas that gets cut back on."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury in Bakersfield ordered the McDonald's Corp. to pay the major share of $700,000 in punitive damages awarded Tuesday to the family of a 9-year-old girl whose leg was broken while she was using playground equipment at one of the chain's restaurants. On Monday, the same Kern County Superior Court jury had held McDonald's and JBI Inc. of Long Beach, manufacturers of the equipment, liable for $43,900 in general damages for the injury Marlena Escalera suffered Dec.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1999
Marketing tips, new cooking technologies and cooking demonstrations will be among the offerings at the California Restaurant Assn. convention scheduled for Saturday at the Los Angeles Convention Center. More than 40,000 people are expected to attend and 1,300 exhibitors have booked space to show off products and services such as bulk foods and ingredients, new cooking devices, restaurant equipment and accessories.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS
Carol Krug worked late two weeks ago, until 2 a.m., cleaning up after a Sunday-night staff party at Bob Burns restaurant in Woodland Hills. She needn't have bothered. Two-and-a-half hours later, toppled restaurant equipment, broken glass and shattered china were strewn everywhere, the result of the 6.6-magnitude earthquake. "This is a big restaurant and we had a big mess," says Krug, who is general manager of Bob Burns. "Just about everything broke."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury in Bakersfield ordered the McDonald's Corp. to pay the major share of $700,000 in punitive damages awarded Tuesday to the family of a 9-year-old girl whose leg was broken while she was using playground equipment at one of the chain's restaurants. On Monday, the same Kern County Superior Court jury had held McDonald's and JBI Inc. of Long Beach, manufacturers of the equipment, liable for $43,900 in general damages for the injury Marlena Escalera suffered Dec.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
As if fewer customers and increased competition weren't enough problems, restaurant operators in Southern California have another headache looming: smog control. The Air Quality Management District, seeking to reduce so-called stationary (non-automotive) sources of air pollution, is thinking of imposing stringent controls on charbroilers. Such a move would require that restaurants with such broilers obtain permits and install filters to reduce smoke and ash.
NEWS
January 31, 1985
Investigators have determined that a fire in the Proud Bird restaurant, which claimed the life of a Los Angeles firefighter and caused $2 million damage, was set to cover the theft of restaurant equipment. Fire Department Capt. Tony DiDomenico said a large commercial refrigerator and a large freezer unit--both stainless steel and manufactured by Raetone-- were stolen, shortly before the blaze broke out in the early morning hours of Dec. 4, 1984.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Marketing tips, new cooking technologies and new products will be among the offerings at the California Restaurant Assn.'s convention scheduled for Saturday at the Los Angeles Convention Center. More than 40,000 people are expected to attend, and 1,300 exhibitors have booked space to show off products and services such as bulk foods and ingredients, new cooking devices, restaurant equipment and accessories.
FOOD
December 6, 2000 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locals say that it was the construction of the Santa Monica Freeway that knocked the grace out of the old-fashioned stores lining Washington Boulevard between Culver City and downtown Los Angeles. Whatever did it, the strip is so gritty, one could be forgiven for dismissing it as a goner. But that would be a mistake. Between Crenshaw and Normandie Boulevards, particularly, there is gold in them thar stores.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|