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Restaurant Industry Southern California

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BUSINESS
December 6, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Two San Diego-based restaurant chains have shunned traditional main courses--including beef and fish--in favor of meals consisting of home-style soups, unlimited salad bars and health-conscious desserts. Another flaky fad from Southern California? Maybe. But restaurant industry analysts believe that American diners are ready for meals without main entrees. "It could be the next generation of fast food," according to Joan Lang, executive editor of New York-based Restaurant Business magazine.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
It has come to this in Southern California: a choice between eating or breathing. OK, it's a bit more complicated than that. But would you give up delicious, healthy, California-style charbroiled food to help clean up our dirty air? Don't all speak at once. That appetite-building aroma from the exhaust fan of a charbroiler at the neighborhood restaurant or burger joint contains the same air-polluting junk as the black smoke from a diesel bus.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
It has come to this in Southern California: a choice between eating or breathing. OK, it's a bit more complicated than that. But would you give up delicious, healthy, California-style charbroiled food to help clean up our dirty air? Don't all speak at once. That appetite-building aroma from the exhaust fan of a charbroiler at the neighborhood restaurant or burger joint contains the same air-polluting junk as the black smoke from a diesel bus.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Two San Diego-based restaurant chains have shunned traditional main courses--including beef and fish--in favor of meals consisting of home-style soups, unlimited salad bars and health-conscious desserts. Another flaky fad from Southern California? Maybe. But restaurant industry analysts believe that American diners are ready for meals without main entrees. "It could be the next generation of fast food," according to Joan Lang, executive editor of New York-based Restaurant Business magazine.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | BEVERLY BUSH SMITH, Beverly Bush Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers restaurant news for The Times Orange County Edition
As a part of its ongoing goal of improving the standard of quality of the restaurant industry, the Southern California Restaurant Writers recently presented $15,000 grants to both the Culinary Arts and Food Service program at Orange Coast College and the Culinary Arts program at Glendale Community College. The schools will use the funds for equipment and kitchen remodeling, as well as scholarships.
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