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BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
It's an equation that seems simple but still escapes many restaurateurs: Treat your employees well, and your business will be better for it. Offering restaurant workers good pay, benefits and career mobility usually translates into high short-term costs -- a burden that causes many low-margin eateries to underpay and overwork their employees. But generous management policies also help dining establishments save big in the long run, according to new research from Cornell University and Restaurant Opportunities Centers United.
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NATIONAL
February 23, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The carbon monoxide leak that killed a Long Island restaurant manager and sickened more than two dozen other people was caused by a leaky pipe, officials said Sunday. All of those hospitalized in the Saturday incident were either restaurant workers or emergency responders, A.J. Carter, a spokesman for the town of Huntington, N.Y., told the Los Angeles Times. Steven Nelson, the manager at the Legal Sea Foods restaurant, was found dead in the basement. Carter said some emergency responders became sickened by carbon monoxide when they entered the room where Nelson was found.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A restaurant workers' group and a Los Angeles community clinic have launched a unique cooperative to provide health coverage to a group of people excluded from federal healthcare reform — illegal immigrants. The pilot program, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, offers preventive and primary care to low-wage, uninsured workers in the restaurant industry. Legal immigrants and other restaurant workers who don't meet the criteria or cannot afford coverage under the healthcare law are also eligible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Los Angeles police said Friday that they have arrested a 23-year-old man in connection with the slaying of a Venice restaurant worker in November.  Guillermo "Memo" Carmona-Perez was found Nov. 18 shortly after midnight lying in the street near the intersection of Washington Boulevard and Pacific Avenue "with what appeared to be a stab wound," according to the Los Angeles Police Department. Carmona-Perez, a 24-year-old Venice resident, was taken to a hospital where he died. A watch commander at LAPD's Pacific Station said at the time it was his understanding Carmona-Perez worked at a nearby restaurant.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
A Chicago restaurant worker recalls a time he was sick but felt he had to work or else be fired: "It was an incredibly busy weekend," he said, "at one point, one of my fellow workers sat me down because I was about to faint. The smell of grease and a long shift had taken their toll. I spent the next five days vomiting, expectorating phlegm and drinking a lot of orange juice. I had to force my co-workers to cover for me and work double shifts. They didn't want to see me fired, and I didn't want to lose my job. Later that week, two of my co-workers caught my virus as well as quite a few customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998
For now, Long Beach restaurants will not be required to post health inspection grades in their front windows showing how they ranked after their kitchens were examined. Instead, the city's health department is leaning toward setting up mandatory food handling classes for all restaurant kitchen workers rather than issue grades that range from A for good to C for bad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1996 | JUDY TORRES
After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, Raul Saldivar, a chef at Weber's Place in Reseda, volunteered to cook meals for hundreds of quake victims at Reseda Park. On Sunday, Saldivar and five other San Fernando Valley restaurant employees will be among 29 to receive Hispanic Employees of Restaurants Outstanding Service (HEROS) awards for their work.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey and Tom Hamburger, Los Angeles Times
The National Restaurant Assn. and insurance giant UnitedHealth Group Inc. are teaming up in a bid to make coverage more accessible to millions of restaurant workers without health benefits — three years ahead of when the healthcare overhaul would require everyone to have insurance. The initiative, though limited at the outset, marks one of the largest private-sector efforts to expand health insurance coverage. And its architects said it could ultimately help cover the 4 million to 6 million restaurant employees without health benefits, or about 10% of the nation's current population of uninsured.
NEWS
July 2, 1995
Workers at a 23-year-old restaurant that is scheduled to close are negotiating with the L.A. Omni Hotel to require any new restaurant opening in the building to rehire them. The workers demonstrated last week outside the Minami Restaurant, 930 Wilshire Blvd., demanding that their jobs be saved. Many of the 14 employees, mostly waitresses, cooks and busboys, have worked at the Japanese restaurant from six to 20 years.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2000 | Greg Hernandez, Greg Hernandez covers workplace issues for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5989 and at greg.hernandez@latimes.com
Orange County restaurant, bar and nightclub employees have a new magazine devoted to their workplace. The first issue of Last Call featured such articles as "Things People Do to Their Servers That You Won't Believe," "Are You Being Stalked by Your Co-Worker?" and "No Tip! What's Up With That?" The monthly publication, which made its debut last month, was distributed free to about 200 bars, restaurants and nightclubs along the coast from San Clemente to Long Beach.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Fast-food workers, union organizers and community supporters rallied nationwide for higher pay Thursday amid criticism from the restaurant industry that the campaign was "part of an ongoing effort to replace fact with fiction while ignoring simple truths. " The first protest in Southern California launched at 6 a.m. at a McDonald's in Florence, as more than 100 people gathered under a still-dark sky with signs and megaphones. "Keep your burgers, keep your fries, make our wages super-sized," they chanted, swaddled against the chill in beanies and hoodies.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Shan Li
Tell The Times how you or your family is dealing with the government shutdown. The budget standoff in Washington has forced widespread cutbacks in services, closed national parks and sent thousands of federal workers on furlough. How are the ripple effects affecting your life? Full coverage: Obamacare rolls out Are you a furloughed government employee who has been told not to go to work? A small business owner who is seeing sales drop or cannot apply for a loan? Someone on holiday who has to reschedule your vacation?
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Shan Li
Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law a bill that mandates overtime pay for domestic workers in California -- with the exception of babysitters. The new measure requires that employers pay domestic workers, which include housekeepers and cleaners, time and a half for any work that exceeds nine hours a day or 45 hours a week. Brown vetoed a more sweeping measure last year that also required rest periods, meal breaks and appropriate sleeping quarters for live-in employees. At the time, he said that bill could heap financial burdens onto families who rely on those workers.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
The fight for higher fast-food wages is coming to Los Angeles. Just a few days before Labor Day, restaurant workers plan to walk off the job at big-name chains around Southern California to demand $15-an-hour pay, according to organizers. The protests, part of a nationwide day of strikes called for Aug. 29, would be the latest in a series of one-day, rolling walkouts that have occurred in major cities in recent weeks. Workers have picketed McDonald's, KFC and Taco Bell and other restaurants during peak mealtimes to demand better pay and the right to organize.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013 | Brian Bennett
Business and labor leaders have hammered out the outline of a compromise on one of the hardest issues in reforming the nation's immigration system -- how to handle future needs for foreign workers in the U.S. Although both sides say key details remain to be negotiated, the deal clears away a significant roadblock to further action in Congress. The bipartisan group of eight senators, which has been crafting an immigration bill, plan to meet next week to discuss the issue. The senators have been waiting to see the results of the talks between the business and labor groups.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
A snowstorm that blanketed Kansas City, Mo., Thursday slowed the investigation into a deadly natural gas explosion, as well as efforts to identify the person who died in the blast, officials said. The Kansas City Fire Department, which finished its on-site investigation Wednesday afternoon, planned to release a report next week on what caused the fatal blast Tuesday that injured several people and destroyed JJ's restaurant , department spokesman James Garrett told the Los Angeles Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday overwhelmingly rejected a controversial proposal to have all restaurant waitresses, busboys and cooks throughout the city tested for the AIDS virus every six months. During a highly emotional 90-minute debate, some council members castigated Councilman Nate Holden for writing the motion. Then the council voted 11 to 1 against the proposal, with only Holden supporting it.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Shan Li
Grocery store chain Albertsons, a division of SuperValu Inc., is laying off up to 2,500 workers at its supermarkets in Southern California and Nevada in an effort to slash costs amid slumping sales. The layoffs will begin June 17 and affect a "small number" of employees at every Albertsons store in the two states, said company spokeswoman Lilia Rodriguez. The chain operates 213 supermarkets in California and 34 in Nevada. Rodriguez declined to comment on the numbers of lost jobs in Los Angeles, but said the majority of payroll reductions will affect California.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The roughly 20 million workers involved up and down the American food chain make up a sixth of the country's entire workforce -- a fifth if you exclude public employees. But they're not treated especially well, according to a new report. The Food Chain Workers Alliance interviewed some 700 workers and employers in food production, processing, distribution, retail and service sectors for its study. That includes employees at farms, slaughterhouses, warehouses, grocery stores, restaurants and more.
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