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Restaurant Workers Layoffs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of the 175 workers at the Hyatt Wilshire Hotel, 1991 ended with a thud. Before dawn Tuesday, their jobs disappeared as a Korea-based hotel chain opening its first U.S. outlet assumed ownership and management of the 396-room Mid-Wilshire hotel and brought in a virtually new set of employees. The practice, which is legal, is most often used by new management companies that want to cut labor costs by ridding themselves of a unionized work force such as that at the Hyatt Wilshire.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
About 300 food-service workers dressed as ghosts marched in Los Angeles International Airport in Westchester Thursday to protest the opening of airport restaurants that refuse to hire laid-off employees or maintain union wage and benefit standards. The protesters dressed as ghosts to symbolize laid-off workers and marched through Terminal 7 and into the McDonald's restaurant, lining up behind the counter to ask for job applications. Tom Walsh, trustee of Local No.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
About 300 food-service workers dressed as ghosts marched in Los Angeles International Airport in Westchester Thursday to protest the opening of airport restaurants that refuse to hire laid-off employees or maintain union wage and benefit standards. The protesters dressed as ghosts to symbolize laid-off workers and marched through Terminal 7 and into the McDonald's restaurant, lining up behind the counter to ask for job applications. Tom Walsh, trustee of Local No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of the 175 workers at the Hyatt Wilshire Hotel, 1991 ended with a thud. Before dawn Tuesday, their jobs disappeared as a Korea-based hotel chain opening its first U.S. outlet assumed ownership and management of the 396-room Mid-Wilshire hotel and brought in a virtually new set of employees. The practice, which is legal, is most often used by new management companies that want to cut labor costs by ridding themselves of a unionized work force such as that at the Hyatt Wilshire.
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