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Restaurant Workers Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
September 6, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dispute with implications for the future of Los Angeles' Koreatown, a group of community organizers and hundreds of immigrant restaurant owners are waging a bitter fight over wages and working conditions. But underneath, it is a power struggle between generations, stemming from different political and cultural values and aspirations.
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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tired of dealing with the high turnover among their waiters, more and more restaurants are adopting an unusual tactic to raise wages: suggesting the proper tip on the check or automatically adding a surcharge to the bill. Before his restaurant started suggesting the amount to tip, Michael Federici, the manager of Trastevere in Santa Monica, watched waiters leave after two or three weeks on the job. "Our employees were getting stiffed left and right," he said.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never one to pass up a good tip--or even a measly one--the IRS on Tuesday launched a nationwide program to increase tax revenue from restaurant workers' often-underreported gratuity income. As do many government plans, the voluntary Tip Rate and Education Program requires owners of participating businesses--principally restaurants, bars and cocktail lounges--to fill out a batch of new paperwork.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a recruitment push unprecedented in its 45-year history, Disneyland is paying its staff as much as $500 to round up new employees--more than a week's wages for most park workers. At the nearby Orange County School of Culinary Arts, restaurants are snapping up graduates as soon as their training is over. And at a recent gathering sponsored by Anaheim's hotel association, the talk was not only of boosting pay and benefits, but of busing in help from faraway places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zoila Herrera Manzano worked thousands of hours at the Jang Mo Gip restaurant on Garden Grove Boulevard--sometimes 12 hours a day, six days a week. She emptied trash cans, washed dishes and cleaned toilets. But Herrera, a 33-year-old, Spanish-speaking immigrant from Mexico, was paid just a little over $2 an hour during a 16-month period of employment beginning in December, 1989.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday dismissed a $1.1-million judgment awarded to three former waiters at the El Pollo Inka restaurant chain who had claimed they were paid only tips and no hourly wages. U.S. District Court Judge Audrey Collins set aside the judgment entered last month against the Southland chicken chain, whose owners had failed to respond to a Sept. 30 lawsuit. The decision means that the case will now go to trial.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tired of dealing with the high turnover among their waiters, more and more restaurants are adopting an unusual tactic to raise wages: suggesting the proper tip on the check or automatically adding a surcharge to the bill. Before his restaurant started suggesting the amount to tip, Michael Federici, the manager of Trastevere in Santa Monica, watched waiters leave after two or three weeks on the job. "Our employees were getting stiffed left and right," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA
Juan Montez has recently learned an unfortunate new phrase in the American business lexicon: rubber check. As a former dishwasher for Larry's Malibu Coast Bistro, Montez says he received numerous bad checks as payment for long hours doing dirty dishes in a sweaty kitchen of the upscale eatery. And owner Larry Berkowitz's restaurant, Montez says, stills owes him more than $600 for weeks of labor.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never one to pass up a good tip--or even a measly one--the IRS has launched a nationwide program to increase tax revenue from the gratuities of restaurant workers. The voluntary Tip Rate and Education Program requires owners of participating businesses--principally restaurants, bars and cocktail lounges--to fill out a batch of new paperwork. Restaurant owners also would have to encourage their employees to sign up in order to make the plan work.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court, reviewing a hard-fought legal battle between labor groups and employers, was asked Wednesday to strike down a subminimum wage for restaurant workers and other employees who receive tips. Lawyers for the state AFL-CIO and several individual workers told the justices that the two-tier wage system implemented in July conflicts with a state law intended to bar lesser pay for tipped employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tearful but determined Koreatown waitress Saturday urged local, state and federal officials to enforce labor laws with vigilance so that other restaurant workers will be spared her pain. During an unprecedented meeting between authorities and Koreatown restaurant workers who spoke about their wages and working conditions, Jung Hee Lee said that she suffered a debilitating back injury while on the job.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dispute with implications for the future of Los Angeles' Koreatown, a group of community organizers and hundreds of immigrant restaurant owners are waging a bitter fight over wages and working conditions. But underneath, it is a power struggle between generations, stemming from different political and cultural values and aspirations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal probe of Koreatown-area restaurants uncovered rampant violations of minimum wage and overtime laws, the U.S. Labor Department announced Friday. In a sweep of 43 randomly picked restaurants, investigators found that 200 workers were underpaid by $250,000. All but two of the restaurants had violated the labor laws, said regional spokesman Tino Serrano of the U.S. Labor Department.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday dismissed a $1.1-million judgment awarded to three former waiters at the El Pollo Inka restaurant chain who had claimed they were paid only tips and no hourly wages. U.S. District Court Judge Audrey Collins set aside the judgment entered last month against the Southland chicken chain, whose owners had failed to respond to a Sept. 30 lawsuit. The decision means that the case will now go to trial.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did the owners of a popular string of Peruvian restaurants work their immigrant employees up to 14 hours a day for no pay? Or were they simply the victims of some lousy lawyering? The fate of the family-owned El Pollo Inka restaurant chain may depend on the answer, after a federal judge this week awarded three former waiters at the Southland chicken restaurants $1.1 million in back wages and damages. U.S. District Judge Audrey Collins entered the judgment Monday after El Pollo Inka Inc.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | Reuters
Jing Fong, New York City's largest Chinese restaurant, has settled a lawsuit for $1.1 million with 58 workers allegedly cheated out of back pay and tips and paid less than the minimum wage. The agreement ended a suit filed by New York Atty. Gen. Dennis Vacco and a related case filed in federal court by the Manhattan-based Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund on behalf of 11 former and current workers. Vacco said the restaurant paid as little as $65 for a 60-hour week.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court agreed Wednesday to review the legality of a controversial "subminimum" wage for California restaurant employees and other workers who receive tips. The justices moved quickly to resolve the issue, ordering arguments in September over whether the state Industrial Welfare Commission properly set a $3.50-per-hour minimum for tipped employees while raising the wage floor to $4.25 for other workers. A decision could come early this fall.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a victory for labor and civil rights groups, the state Supreme Court on Monday struck down the subminimum wage that had been imposed in July for more than 500,000 restaurant employees and other workers who receive tips. The court unanimously invalidated a two-tier wage system adopted by the state Industrial Welfare Commission that raised the minimum hourly wage from $3.35 to $4.25 for most workers--but increased it to only $3.50 for those receiving at least $60 a month in tips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA
Juan Montez has recently learned an unfortunate new phrase in the American business lexicon: rubber check. As a former dishwasher for Larry's Malibu Coast Bistro, Montez says he received numerous bad checks as payment for long hours doing dirty dishes in a sweaty kitchen of the upscale eatery. And owner Larry Berkowitz's restaurant, Montez says, stills owes him more than $600 for weeks of labor.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state's top prosecutor filed suit against Chinatown's biggest restaurant, demanding $1.5 million in back pay for 58 waiters who toiled for "slave wages" in the three-story dim sum palace. Atty. Gen. Dennis Vacco's lawsuit against the Jing Fong restaurant also seeks $400,000 in damages for the waiters, including Sheng Gang Deng, who claims he was fired in 1995 for protesting sweatshop conditions. A restaurant manager said no one was available to comment. The Chinese Staff and Workers Assn.
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