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BUSINESS
May 21, 1997 | NANCY ZUBIRI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rosa and Salomon Jaime realized they had a recipe for success when their first Pollo Inka restaurant became so packed every night that people who couldn't get inside would order takeout and eat in their cars.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
California became the first state to require restaurants to cook without artery-clogging trans fats, such as those in many oils and margarines, under restrictions signed into law Friday by the health-conscious governor. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, a physical-fitness advocate and crusader against obesity, sided with legislators who said the measure would help get the fat out of Californians who are too dependent on fast food.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE
Marriott Corp. has agreed to buy nine Jolly Roger restaurants--including three in Orange County--from Trans/Pacific Restaurants Inc. for an undisclosed sum. The restaurants will keep the Jolly Roger name for the immediate future. But Marriott plans eventually to convert them to the chain's new family restaurant--Allie's--said Richard Sneed, Marriott's manager of public relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state board that oversees tax policy has ruled that Indian tribes no longer are required to collect state and local sales taxes on their restaurant sales--inspiring the head of the California Restaurant Assn. to say he may seek relief for restaurants not on reservations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a year, but things turned out OK for the Okie Girl on Friday. A Superior Court judge in Bakersfield ordered state highway officials to install four "motorist services" signs that will help direct Golden State Freeway travelers to the Okie Girl barbecue restaurant at the Los Angeles-Kern county line, 50 miles north of the San Fernando Valley.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On New Year's Day, one of the nation's toughest anti-smoking laws takes effect in California. Lighting up will be banned in most enclosed workplaces and virtually all restaurants. While health groups and others have praised the ban as a victory in the fight against the dangers of secondhand smoke, some business groups say the new statute is vague and will give employers headaches. And it is not universally popular.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his starched white chef's hat and jacket, Pierre Pelech fretted over renewed talk about banning all cigarette smoking in restaurants in Los Angeles. "It would be catastrophic for the restaurant business," said Pelech, co-owner of Pierre's restaurant in Los Feliz. "There would be a drop in business, and that would put people out of work." A raspy voice from the restaurant bar added: "I don't mind cigarette smoke."
BUSINESS
August 21, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Restaurant Enterprises Group Inc., operators of such popular eateries as Carrows, Reuben's and El Torito, said Thursday that it lost $9.3 million for the second quarter and has hired two investment banking firms to help it restructure its long-term debt. Corporate executives said that the financial condition of the privately held Irvine-based company is not serious enough at present for them to consider seeking any relief in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
As if fewer customers and increased competition weren't enough problems, restaurant operators in Southern California have another headache looming: smog control. The Air Quality Management District, seeking to reduce so-called stationary (non-automotive) sources of air pollution, is thinking of imposing stringent controls on charbroilers. Such a move would require that restaurants with such broilers obtain permits and install filters to reduce smoke and ash.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | Associated Press
Hundreds of patrons and employees of a restaurant here have received shots to prevent hepatitis A infection. Health officials announced this week that a waitress at Mimi's Cafe had been diagnosed with the virus, which is contagious but rarely fatal. Public officials advised patrons who ate during the waitress' shifts to get the shots. Hepatitis A symptoms include chills, high fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, abdominal pain, dark urine and jaundice.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998
Newport Beach-based Newriders Inc. agreed to acquire closely held Paisano Publications, based in Agoura, for an undisclosed price in stock and cash, giving Newriders full rights to the name of the Easyriders Cafe restaurants it operates. Paisano, which has annual revenue of about $38 million, publishes motorcycle-oriented magazines such as Easyriders, owns the themed restaurants and sells motorcycle-related apparel. It also owns clothing stores and motorcycle superstores.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1989 when Noah Alper opened his first Noah's New York Bagels shop in Berkeley, he decided to keep things strictly kosher. Now, to the chagrin of many kosher Jews, the chain, which Alper sold in 1996, has gone treif. In other words, Noah's is no longer kosher.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
Parent companies of California's major utilities are battling a proposal that would ban their affiliates from selling electricity in the parent's service area or using its name and logo during the first two years of energy deregulation. The proposal, scheduled to go before the California Public Utilities Commission today, is designed to make it more difficult for affiliates of the state's investor-owned utilities to dominate the electricity market after deregulation takes effect Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1997 | NANCY ZUBIRI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rosa and Salomon Jaime realized they had a recipe for success when their first Pollo Inka restaurant became so packed every night that people who couldn't get inside would order takeout and eat in their cars.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On New Year's Day, one of the nation's toughest anti-smoking laws takes effect in California. Lighting up will be banned in most enclosed workplaces and virtually all restaurants. While health groups and others have praised the ban as a victory in the fight against the dangers of secondhand smoke, some business groups say the new statute is vague and will give employers headaches. And it is not universally popular.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Medical Assn. Wednesday proposed tough anti-smoking legislation that would make California the country's most inhospitable state to smokers. The medical association wants statewide bans on cigarette sales through vending machines, and on smoking in restaurants, bars and hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1987 | From United Press International
Southern California restaurant patrons should not think they're getting bad service if they don't automatically get water with their meals. About 3,500 restaurants in the area are joining the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in a water-conservation program. Instead of a glass of water, diners will find a small sign on their tables informing them that, "Water is life. Please use it wisely."
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philip Morris U.S.A., the nation's largest cigarette manufacturer, and some Los Angeles area restaurants plan to sponsor a November ballot initiative that would abolish local anti-smoking ordinances in California, The Times learned Monday. The initiative, called the California Uniform Tobacco Control Act, would place the responsibility for regulating smoking in the hands of the Legislature, and invalidate smoking bans in Los Angeles, Orange County and more than 100 other cities and counties.
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