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NEWS
April 18, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frenchman Patrick Mathey comes out of the kitchen of his restaurant, Chez Patrick. The mussels in a light wine sauce are superb. So too, he offers, is the loup-marin a la canneberge--seal in a brown sauce with cranberries. "I've eaten giraffe, crocodile, antelope. The seal is the best. Ah, oui," he declares. A few miles up the road, Le P'tite Baie offers a $20 fixed-price menu: vegetable soup, choice of scallops, cod in lobster sauce, chicken curry or seal bourguignonne, with dessert and coffee.
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NEWS
April 18, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frenchman Patrick Mathey comes out of the kitchen of his restaurant, Chez Patrick. The mussels in a light wine sauce are superb. So too, he offers, is the loup-marin a la canneberge--seal in a brown sauce with cranberries. "I've eaten giraffe, crocodile, antelope. The seal is the best. Ah, oui," he declares. A few miles up the road, Le P'tite Baie offers a $20 fixed-price menu: vegetable soup, choice of scallops, cod in lobster sauce, chicken curry or seal bourguignonne, with dessert and coffee.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 1985
The company said it sold the stock to a privately held company that it did not identify. USACafes had said earlier that it planned to sell its Shakey's stock--which it purchased for $2.5 million in January, 1984, for investment purposes--and that USACafes "would not incur a loss on the transaction." USACafes said it retained the franchising rights to Shakey's restaurants in Canada.
FOOD
February 2, 2013 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
What do some of Southern California's top bowls of ramen - the tsukemen at Tsujita, tonkotsu ramen at Daikokuya and kotteri shoyu ramen at Asa in Gardena - have in common? Their noodles come from the same place: a small factory near the Compton-Gardena line called Sun Noodle. The L.A. branch of a Honolulu-based company launched nine years ago, making just 10 kinds of fresh ramen noodles. Now, in the midst of a global ramen boom, the factory makes 160 kinds, to customers' exacting specifications - 31/2 tons a day, or enough for 30,000 servings, says Vice President Keisuke Sawakawa.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wendy's to Buy Canadian Chain: The Dublin, Ohio-based company said it will acquire Tim Hortons, Canada's largest chain of coffee and doughnut shops, for more than $400 million. The combined company will have more than 1,186 restaurants in Canada. Worldwide, its network will expand to more than 5,500 outlets, with 1995 annual sales of more than $5 billion. Wendy's International Inc. has 1,283 company-owned and 3,220 franchised restaurants in 34 countries. It had earnings of $97.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chubby Checker Sues McDonald's Canada: Singer Chubby Checker, who has been doing "The Twist" since the song was a hit in 1960, is suing McDonald's Restaurants of Canada for allegedly imitating his voice in its commercials. He is seeking $14.8 million. "We believe that when people hear the advertisements on the radio and television, they think it is Chubby Checker who is singing," said Tony DeLauro, Checker's manager. "Mr. Checker's permission was never granted, and he was never compensated."
BUSINESS
December 13, 1989 | From Reuters
McDonald's Corp. said today that more than 25,000 Muscovites have responded to a single help-wanted ad in a newspaper seeking to fill 630 crew positions at the chain's first restaurant in Moscow. The McDonald's restaurant on Pushkin Square is scheduled to open Jan. 31. It will be the fast-food giant's largest operation, seating 700 people indoors and another 200 outside and is expected to serve more than 15,000 customers a day.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | Times Wire Services
McDonald's restaurants of Canada signed a joint venture agreement with the Moscow City Council today that will allow the giant hamburger chain to open up to 20 fast-food restaurants in the Soviet capital beginning in 1989. "McDonald's is bringing more than just restaurants to the Soviet Union," said George Cohon, president and chief executive officer of McDonald's Canada, at the formal signing ceremony in the Moscow City Soviet (Council) chambers.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1990 | From Reuters
Four weeks after the opening of the first McDonald's in the Soviet Union, Moscow is still in the grip of fast-food fever, with 30,000 Muscovites lining up daily for hamburgers and fries, a company official said Wednesday. The Oak Brook, Ill.-based company had originally predicted that the world's largest McDonald's would serve 10,000 to 15,000 people daily. McDonald's says it serves 22 million people daily in 11,000 restaurants in 52 countries.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Soviets will get a chance to munch "Bolshoi Macs" when the first of about 20 McDonald's restaurants in Moscow opens next year, officials from the city and the giant hamburger chain announced Friday. "I think that the McDonald's in Moscow will be the highest volume McDonald's in the world," said George A. Cohon, president of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Ltd., a subsidiary of McDonald's Corp. of Oak Brook, Ill. Cohon and Vladimir I.
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