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BUSINESS
April 17, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonald's to Expand: The Oakbrook, Ill.-based company said it has exercised an option to buy out its joint venture in Hong Kong as part of a plan to open about 600 of its fast-food restaurants in China over the next decade. McDonald Corp. said it will retain longtime joint venture partner Daniel Ng Yat Chiu as its new chairman in Hong Kong after buying him out. The company did not release financial terms of the deal for Ng's unspecified stake in the Hong Kong venture, which was formed in 1975.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Looking for evidence of China's economic prowess, Europe's malaise and consumer ennui in the U.S.? Use the international restaurant industry as a barometer, according to a report this week. China's economy, coming off a period of blistering growth, is expanding at its slowest rate in years. But the Asian superpower is still projected to account for 40% of this year's global growth, according to the World Bank. That increase is evident in China's restaurants, according to research firm NPD Group.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Carl's Jr. happy star is going to the land of the red star. The Anaheim-based parent company of the Carl's Jr. hamburger chain plans to open its first restaurant in China next month. The company has signed up a licensee in Beijing to operate the restaurant, which could serve as a prototype for future Carl's Jrs. in that country, sources said. Carl Karcher Enterprises will join a growing list of U.S. fast-food chains that have taken an interest in the Chinese market.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2009 | Don Lee
Down an alley from a KFC, McDonald's and Pizza Hut in Shanghai, Li Hong sat inside a dingy little storefront that serves full-course dinners for a dollar. Her tray was filled with cabbage, carrots, potatoes, a chicken leg and rice, plus soup. A Western fast-food meal would have cost her three times that much, said the young woman, who works as a sales clerk. "Why should I go there?" she said. In the U.S., fast-food chains often thrive in tough times. But not so in China, where Western quick-service food isn't the cheapest stuff in town and, in target markets like Shanghai, there's too much competition.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | From Reuters
Ten years after China began its economic reforms, it has put its most authoritative stamp of approval on them--Mao Tse-tung's family has gone into business, the China Youth Daily said Saturday. In Shaoshan in south China's Hunan province, Mao's birthplace, members of the late leader's family have opened the Mao Family Restaurant, which serves several hundred customers daily--most of them tourists. The newspaper said the restaurant has four employees.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just to set the record straight: Ah Jing said she is not dead. Nor was she kidnaped. Nor--as one popular version of the story goes--was her lover snatched by underworld thugs and murdered. Still, the news of the celebrated Beijing restaurateur's well-being might surprise and even disappoint many people in the Chinese capital these days. Beijing, like much of China, is preoccupied with fantastic crime tales.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | Reuters
A kiss cost $21 in a Chinese restaurant--and the manager his job, and possibly his life--after police raided the establishment in a crackdown on prostitution. The police raid "caught 14 criminals right in the middle of their dirty acts," Shanghai's Xinmin Evening News reported. It said a kiss cost $21 in the restaurant. Other prices were not given. Procuring prostitutes is a crime punishable by death in China.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | United Press International
Police in eastern China closed 13 underground cafes that were run as illegal brothels with hired thugs that forced customers to pay as much as $13 for a cup of coffee, the China Daily said Thursday. The cafes, the targets of an undercover operation that involved 60 police officers, were shut down and 22 people were arrested in the Nov. 16 raids in Hangzhou, 700 miles southeast of Beijing, the newspaper said.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | From Reuters
Maxim's, Beijing's best-known symbol of Western bourgeois elegance, will reopen at the end of the month, five months after it closed following the military crackdown on the pro-democracy movement. French manager Song Huaigui said Saturday the restaurant, a popular spot for well-heeled foreigners since it opened in 1983, will resume its dinner service but for the time being will remain closed at lunch. The restaurant is a joint venture of the French and Chinese.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Don Dempsey, president of China development for burger titan McDonald's, the recent bankruptcy of the giant Guangdong International Trust & Investment Corp. poses little threat to the firm's rapid expansion in China, where it currently has 220 outlets. McDonald's had a joint venture partnership with the Guangdong investment trust, or Gitic, to operate 37 restaurants in the prosperous southern province bordering Hong Kong.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Don Dempsey, president of China development for burger titan McDonald's, the recent bankruptcy of the giant Guangdong International Trust & Investment Corp. poses little threat to the firm's rapid expansion in China, where it currently has 220 outlets. McDonald's had a joint venture partnership with the Guangdong investment trust, or Gitic, to operate 37 restaurants in the prosperous southern province bordering Hong Kong.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just to set the record straight: Ah Jing said she is not dead. Nor was she kidnaped. Nor--as one popular version of the story goes--was her lover snatched by underworld thugs and murdered. Still, the news of the celebrated Beijing restaurateur's well-being might surprise and even disappoint many people in the Chinese capital these days. Beijing, like much of China, is preoccupied with fantastic crime tales.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zhu Honglin is on the front lines of the world's biggest food fight, and the 26-year-old manager of the Ding Gua Gua ("The Top") fried chicken outlet here in the capital of Fujian province describes the battle as "very fierce." Just around the corner from her 200-seat restaurant is a 300-seat KFC outlet that opened last December. The hegemonic KFC motto is played incessantly on local radio: "To Be First in the World in Good Taste." Diagonally across the intersection is a 290-seat McDonald's.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who reviews restaurants weekly for the Times Orange County Edition.
China Palms is quietly struggling to popularize authentic Chinese dishes in south Orange County. The battle is far from won. The owners, Hong Kong-born Joseph and Gina Ling, once had a restaurant in Fullerton (like this one, named China Palms). There they were able to feature a variety of rustic Cantonese dishes, thanks to solid support from a large contingent of Chinese Americans living in nearby Walnut, Hacienda Heights and Whittier.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonald's to Expand: The Oakbrook, Ill.-based company said it has exercised an option to buy out its joint venture in Hong Kong as part of a plan to open about 600 of its fast-food restaurants in China over the next decade. McDonald Corp. said it will retain longtime joint venture partner Daniel Ng Yat Chiu as its new chairman in Hong Kong after buying him out. The company did not release financial terms of the deal for Ng's unspecified stake in the Hong Kong venture, which was formed in 1975.
MAGAZINE
March 5, 1995 | S. Irene Virbila
My friend Steve will fall in love with a restaurant, a Thai noodle house, say, and go there nearly every day for lunch until the place closes or until another restaurant replaces it in his affections. At first, he'll explore the menu, but very soon, he'll settle on a handful of dishes and order them again and again. He's the one who told me about a new Chinese restaurant on the Westside where he had 22 meals the first month it opened. Three months later, he's managed to eat at Hong Kong-style J.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zhu Honglin is on the front lines of the world's biggest food fight, and the 26-year-old manager of the Ding Gua Gua ("The Top") fried chicken outlet here in the capital of Fujian province describes the battle as "very fierce." Just around the corner from her 200-seat restaurant is a 300-seat KFC outlet that opened last December. The hegemonic KFC motto is played incessantly on local radio: "To Be First in the World in Good Taste." Diagonally across the intersection is a 290-seat McDonald's.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Looking for evidence of China's economic prowess, Europe's malaise and consumer ennui in the U.S.? Use the international restaurant industry as a barometer, according to a report this week. China's economy, coming off a period of blistering growth, is expanding at its slowest rate in years. But the Asian superpower is still projected to account for 40% of this year's global growth, according to the World Bank. That increase is evident in China's restaurants, according to research firm NPD Group.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Carl's Jr. happy star is going to the land of the red star. The Anaheim-based parent company of the Carl's Jr. hamburger chain plans to open its first restaurant in China next month. The company has signed up a licensee in Beijing to operate the restaurant, which could serve as a prototype for future Carl's Jrs. in that country, sources said. Carl Karcher Enterprises will join a growing list of U.S. fast-food chains that have taken an interest in the Chinese market.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | Reuters
A kiss cost $21 in a Chinese restaurant--and the manager his job, and possibly his life--after police raided the establishment in a crackdown on prostitution. The police raid "caught 14 criminals right in the middle of their dirty acts," Shanghai's Xinmin Evening News reported. It said a kiss cost $21 in the restaurant. Other prices were not given. Procuring prostitutes is a crime punishable by death in China.
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