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Restaurants For Sensible Voluntary Policy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One month after the California Restaurant Assn. announced it would support a ban on smoking in all public places, the owners of more than 100 Los Angeles eateries--including such celebrated spots as Spago, Ma Maison, Citrus and others--have combined forces to oppose a proposed citywide ban on smoking in all restaurants. The group, which calls itself RSVP--Restaurants for Sensible Voluntary Policy--said it is not breaking from the statewide organization.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One month after the California Restaurant Assn. announced it would support a ban on smoking in all public places, the owners of more than 100 Los Angeles eateries--including such celebrated spots as Spago, Ma Maison, Citrus and others--have combined forces to oppose a proposed citywide ban on smoking in all restaurants. The group, which calls itself RSVP--Restaurants for Sensible Voluntary Policy--said it is not breaking from the statewide organization.
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NEWS
November 1, 1990
Smoking will be prohibited in Culver City restaurants with fewer than 25 seats, the City Council decided Monday. The council also directed city staff to research the use of dual ventilation systems in restaurants with smoking and nonsmoking sections. The council voted 4 to 1 for the ban, with Councilwoman Jozelle Smith opposed. "I think it would be horrendous for the little mom-and-pop restaurants," said Smith, a nonsmoker.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week before the city's strict ban on smoking becomes law, two of its strongest supporters on the City Council have backed away, claiming they made a mistake. An attempt by the two councilmen to water down the law was defeated by a 3-2 vote Monday night, and the law will go into effect March 5. Councilman Joseph E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Two Los Angeles City Council committees, after hearing two hours of vigorous debate, approved a controversial ordinance Monday to ban smoking in the city's 8,600 restaurants. However, the committees also voted to put off submitting the ordinance for consideration by the full council for at least four weeks to give opponents time to propose possible amendments that may lead to a less-restrictive law. Typically, ordinances adopted by committee are forwarded to the full council within two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to ban smoking in all Los Angeles restaurants was approved by a City Council committee Monday over the protests of restaurant owners, who fear their businesses would be hurt. If the full council approves the measure, Los Angeles would become the first major city in the nation to impose such a ban. The controversial matter will be taken up in four to five weeks and council members expect heavy lobbying. "To say the very least, we are elated.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lunch crowd rolls into the Cherokee Cafe early and stays late. At its peak all 98 seats are taken, mostly by smokers, and these days, mostly by smokers who are fuming. In less than two months, smokers will no longer be allowed to light up a cigarette or anything else before, during, or after any meal in any Bellflower restaurant.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of the tobacco industry and a powerful restaurant lobby group, as well as irate business owners, plan to descend on the City Council on Monday night to try to derail an ordinance that would outlaw smoking in city restaurants. The council last month initially approved the ordinance, one of Southern California's strictest. Smoking would be banned in public restaurants and virtually every enclosed space to which the public has access.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle over air quality is to move indoors today, with members of the Los Angeles City Council scheduled to vote on what would be the toughest anti-smoking measure implemented by a major U.S. city: an outright ban on smoking in restaurants. Since the measure's introduction last summer, the lobbying has been intense. Proponents have cited health studies about the harm of secondhand smoke, while those opposed have invoked the specters of legislative overkill and economic hardship.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed ban on cigarette smoking at all Los Angeles restaurants was snuffed out Tuesday by the City Council, which instead decided to explore requiring the installation of partitions and ventilation systems to protect the health of nonsmoking diners. The decision followed 90 minutes of sometimes heated debate among council members.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | BARBARA KOH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Culver City adopted tougher anti-smoking provisions this week for restaurants, prompting one chain to announce that it was abandoning its plan to open an eatery in the community. Marie Callender's, which had intended to put a restaurant in a complex near the Fox Hills Mall, has officially withdrawn its proposal, according to Louis Boemia, director of development for the family-style restaurant chain.
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