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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1989 | STEPHANIE CURTIS
It's a Frenchman's pleasure to dine out. And, in a sense, his patriotic duty. The great revolution over which countless aristocrats lost their heads put ideas into others, notably the brigades of private maitres d'hotel and chefs facing sudden unemployment. In an era when it was dangerous to be less revolutionary than one's neighbor, the cleverest among this new class of unemployed disavowed their aristocratic ties and looked to put their talents to work in patriotic ways.
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TRAVEL
March 12, 2011
Last year my daughter-in-law and I had a fantastic three-week trip through France. In Orleans, where the restaurant choices are plentiful, we were lucky to be advised by a local to have lunch at L'Eclat des Saveurs. The tab came to 79 Euros, or about $110, for the two of us, which included a St.Emilion for her and a Cointreau for me. L'Eclat des Saveurs, 233 Rue de Bourgogne, Orleans; 011-33-02-38-53-12-21, http://www.viking-resto.com . Entree with appetizer or dessert, from about $29. Sheppa Vanderkleij Indio
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1989 | COLMAN ANDREWS
The 80th edition of the venerable Michelin food and travel guide was published in France on Thursday with the news that Le Crocodile in Strasbourg, has been added to the guide's three-star ranking. The newest member of the Michelin firmament brings the guide's number of three-star restaurants in France to just 19 restaurants. Le Crocodile, founded about 1790, was bought by its present owner/chef, Emile Jung, in 1971.
OPINION
July 26, 2010
An 'honest meal' Re "Restaurant closure hard to swallow," July 22 As a downtown resident, I have to say that the trendy new restaurants where every item is served a la carte and in tiny portions at inflated prices can't compare to Edward's Steak House. As a boy, my parents took me to Edward's on Alvarado. I will never forget the gracious servers or the nice old man in the parking lot who always helped customers find a space — not to mention the delicious, juicy steaks.
SPORTS
February 13, 1992 | MIKE KUPPER
The French dining experience is supposed to be exquisite, but for Mike Moran, exquisite is hardly the proper adjective. If the United States Olympic Committee's press chief chooses to take the rest of his meals in his room here during the Winter Olympics, it will be entirely understandable. Here's his tale: "The first indication that it wasn't going to go well was that they didn't have bread for a sandwich. In France, no bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | By COLMAN ANDREWS
Here, in its entirety, is a restaurant review which appeared in early April in the prominent French newspaper Figaro: "Au Quick, le 'giant' (16.70F) manque un peu de personnalite mais le dosage de sauce est parfait. Les frites (8.60F) meriteraient peut-etre un peu plus de cuisson. Au dessert, surprise, une patisserie bien de chez vous, la gosette d'abricot (5.50F). Arrose d'un Coca, un repas correct et rapide pour 36.60F." "Quick", in case you're wondering, is a $120-million-a-year Franco-Belgian hamburger chain, with some 78 units scattered all over France--and the meal thus reviewed in Figaro was a typical hamburger-chain repast: a "giant" burger (which, said the newspaper, lacked "a bit of personality," but was perfectly dosed with sauce)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
A famous old hotel and restaurant in northwestern Burgundy, built around a 1707-vintage stagecoach stop. A three-star rating from the Guide Michelin, and many years of glory in the firmament of French gastronomy. Then a proprietor growing old and losing interest. A daughter taking over, making mistakes, firing chefs. A long, slow, sad slide into mediocrity, with two stars lost along the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Bistro-mania continues to sweep France. Such noted chefs as Roger Verge on the Cote d'Azur, Francis Garcia in Bordeaux and Michel Rostang and Guy Savoy here in Paris have launched bistros, supplementing their well-known formal restaurants. More recently, when Jacques Maximin opened his elaborate Maximin restaurant in Nice, he installed the modest Bistro de Nice next door.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | Times Wire Services
French chefs and restaurant owners protesting high taxes pelted surprised riot police here with eggs and flour Monday, prompting the officers to respond with tear gas to keep them away from the National Assembly. Hundreds of protesters, many wearing chef's hats and banging pots, converged on the parliament to demand that the 20.6% value-added tax on restaurants be cut to the 5.5% rate that fast-food establishments such as McDonald's enjoy.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
France's passionate romance with tobacco and smoking dates back to the 16th Century, when a young diplomat named Jean Nicot introduced the plant into the royal court as a miracle cure. After trying it herself, Queen Catherine de' Medici endorsed tobacco as a treatment for migraine. Tobacco was soon the rage of the court. Jean Nicot was feted as the discoverer of the new drug "nicotine."
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | Times Wire Services
French chefs and restaurant owners protesting high taxes pelted surprised riot police here with eggs and flour Monday, prompting the officers to respond with tear gas to keep them away from the National Assembly. Hundreds of protesters, many wearing chef's hats and banging pots, converged on the parliament to demand that the 20.6% value-added tax on restaurants be cut to the 5.5% rate that fast-food establishments such as McDonald's enjoy.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can great chefs turn out superb meals in two places at once? In a veritable revolution in French gastronomy, the anonymous men who are supposed to be this country's most finicky eaters agreed this week that yes, they can. In the new Michelin Guide to French restaurants, Alain Ducasse, a cocky cook with a salt-and-pepper beard and sharp tongue, has been awarded six coveted stars--twice the supreme rating.
FOOD
February 1, 1996 | ANNE WILLAN, Willan's most recent cookbook is "In and Out of the Kitchen in 15 Minutes or Less" (Rizzoli, 1995)
When Leslie Caron played a girl taking lessons in the art of cooking cassoulet and pouring coffee in "Gigi," she could hardly have imagined that one day she would be running a restaurant. The idea began at home, where Caron often handles the cooking. "I have big eaters as friends," she says, "and I like to give them things they don't have in their daily meals." Dishes must be quick and simple, like duck maigret cooked on the grill or a pot au feu of fresh and smoked fish.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before Friday, times were tough for the great French chefs. Recession and higher sales taxes had hit them hard, erasing many of the notoriously long waiting lists for tables at their restaurants. And chefs were still smarting from the 1996 Gault-Millau guide, which summarily demoted more than half of the top-ranked establishments.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
France's passionate romance with tobacco and smoking dates back to the 16th Century, when a young diplomat named Jean Nicot introduced the plant into the royal court as a miracle cure. After trying it herself, Queen Catherine de' Medici endorsed tobacco as a treatment for migraine. Tobacco was soon the rage of the court. Jean Nicot was feted as the discoverer of the new drug "nicotine."
SPORTS
February 13, 1992 | MIKE KUPPER
The French dining experience is supposed to be exquisite, but for Mike Moran, exquisite is hardly the proper adjective. If the United States Olympic Committee's press chief chooses to take the rest of his meals in his room here during the Winter Olympics, it will be entirely understandable. Here's his tale: "The first indication that it wasn't going to go well was that they didn't have bread for a sandwich. In France, no bread.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before Friday, times were tough for the great French chefs. Recession and higher sales taxes had hit them hard, erasing many of the notoriously long waiting lists for tables at their restaurants. And chefs were still smarting from the 1996 Gault-Millau guide, which summarily demoted more than half of the top-ranked establishments.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can great chefs turn out superb meals in two places at once? In a veritable revolution in French gastronomy, the anonymous men who are supposed to be this country's most finicky eaters agreed this week that yes, they can. In the new Michelin Guide to French restaurants, Alain Ducasse, a cocky cook with a salt-and-pepper beard and sharp tongue, has been awarded six coveted stars--twice the supreme rating.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Bistro-mania continues to sweep France. Such noted chefs as Roger Verge on the Cote d'Azur, Francis Garcia in Bordeaux and Michel Rostang and Guy Savoy here in Paris have launched bistros, supplementing their well-known formal restaurants. More recently, when Jacques Maximin opened his elaborate Maximin restaurant in Nice, he installed the modest Bistro de Nice next door.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1989 | STEPHANIE CURTIS
It's a Frenchman's pleasure to dine out. And, in a sense, his patriotic duty. The great revolution over which countless aristocrats lost their heads put ideas into others, notably the brigades of private maitres d'hotel and chefs facing sudden unemployment. In an era when it was dangerous to be less revolutionary than one's neighbor, the cleverest among this new class of unemployed disavowed their aristocratic ties and looked to put their talents to work in patriotic ways.
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