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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was never a better place to sip a cup of joe. All boomerang angles, glass walls and sunshine colors, the California coffee shop first sprang up in Los Angeles in the optimistic, postwar 1950s. A burger went for 35 cents. A cup of fresh-brewed java cost just a nickel. But you got more than a meal at Norm's, Pann's or Ship's. When you strolled through the Herculite doors, settled into a Naugahyde booth and plopped your elbows down on the Formica, you got a taste of the future.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 29, 1994 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On special occasions, my family ate at Robaire's on La Brea. For us, dining out was a luxury, and while we ate dinner once a week at a family restaurant in Altadena and often started camping trips with coffee-shop eggs, we followed a strict restaurant protocol.
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FOOD
September 29, 1994 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On special occasions, my family ate at Robaire's on La Brea. For us, dining out was a luxury, and while we ate dinner once a week at a family restaurant in Altadena and often started camping trips with coffee-shop eggs, we followed a strict restaurant protocol.
FOOD
September 29, 1994 | BRUCE HENSTELL
What happened to your favorite haunt of yesteryear? Odds are, there are cars parked on it. Progress is no respecter of fine cuisine. If some of the addresses don't jibe with your memories, be aware that many of these restaurants changed location even during their heyday. * The Brown Derby, 1628 Vine St. in Hollywood, was destroyed by fire. * The Cocoanut Grove, 3400 Wilshire Blvd.
FOOD
September 29, 1994 | COLMAN ANDREWS, Andrews, a longtime contributor to The Times Food and Travel sections, is executive editor of Saveur magazine and author of "Everything on the Table" (Bantam). Bruce Henstell, a Los Angeles historian, provided research materials. and
In 1913, in an article in Smart Set magazine, Willard Huntington Wright--who had previously been chief literary critic for this newspaper--wrote this of Los Angeles dining habits: "The spirit of (the city's) provincialism is nowhere better shown than in (its) restaurants and cafes. These eating places are little more than magnified village lunch rooms. The most popular ones are those which serve the largest portions. The gastronomic ideals are simplicity and quantity. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
Michael McCarty is not a modest man. "We were a pioneer, there's no question about it. I clearly think that in 1979, Michael's restaurant defined what restaurants were," he said as he surveyed his brand new restaurant last month in New York. Even before he opened Michael's in Santa Monica (at the ripe old age of 24), humility was not exactly his strong suit. "We're doing something different here," he said as he prepared his menu in 1979. "My specials are going to blow your socks off."
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | PAMELA KLEIBRINK, Kleibrink is a North Hollywood free-lance writer
When Marie Antoinette said: "Let them eat cake," she never told people where to go to have that cake. But if she'd known about the offerings at a few choice restaurants, history might have been different. The peasants would have lost their heads over the chocolate cakes found in 10 delightful forms in Southern California. The Mile-High Cake that's served at Gladstone's, 17300 Pacific Coast Highway in Pacific Palisades, at the Sea Lion at 21150 W. Pacific Coast Highway and R.J.'
FOOD
July 9, 2008 | Betty Hallock, Times Staff Writer
IT'S ANOTHER British invasion for import-cookbook lovers. The latest wave of impressive cookbooks published in the UK -- written by prominent chefs and food writers (and a novelist too) -- is picking up steam. Although some are available only as imports, more are spinning off into American editions. For Anglophiles, the last year's publications are the next best thing to actually having breakfast at the Wolseley or dinner at Maze, or cooking with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall or Fergus Henderson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was never a better place to sip a cup of joe. All boomerang angles, glass walls and sunshine colors, the California coffee shop first sprang up in Los Angeles in the optimistic, postwar 1950s. A burger went for 35 cents. A cup of fresh-brewed java cost just a nickel. But you got more than a meal at Norm's, Pann's or Ship's. When you strolled through the Herculite doors, settled into a Naugahyde booth and plopped your elbows down on the Formica, you got a taste of the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
Michael McCarty is not a modest man. "We were a pioneer, there's no question about it. I clearly think that in 1979, Michael's restaurant defined what restaurants were," he said as he surveyed his brand new restaurant last month in New York. Even before he opened Michael's in Santa Monica (at the ripe old age of 24), humility was not exactly his strong suit. "We're doing something different here," he said as he prepared his menu in 1979. "My specials are going to blow your socks off."
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