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Restaurants Indonesia

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NEWS
July 27, 1991 | Reuters
Stung by criticism for allowing the mass destruction of turtles, the governor of Indonesia's tropical resort island of Bali said he would stop restaurants and hotels from serving them up for meals. "Officials will conduct operations at hotels, restaurants and other eating places, including those where turtles are usually butchered," Gov. Ida Bagus Oka said Friday, according to the Antara news agency.
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NEWS
October 1, 1992 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who reviews restaurants weekly for The Times Orange County Edition.
Indonesia is one of the world's most exotic lands, if it makes sense to call a complex of islands more than 3,000 miles long a land. Restaurant Indonesia, new in Anaheim, envelopes you in the country's intricate culture and makes you long to repeat the experience. It is probably the most compelling Asian restaurant to open locally in recent memory.
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NEWS
October 1, 1992 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who reviews restaurants weekly for The Times Orange County Edition.
Indonesia is one of the world's most exotic lands, if it makes sense to call a complex of islands more than 3,000 miles long a land. Restaurant Indonesia, new in Anaheim, envelopes you in the country's intricate culture and makes you long to repeat the experience. It is probably the most compelling Asian restaurant to open locally in recent memory.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | Reuters
Stung by criticism for allowing the mass destruction of turtles, the governor of Indonesia's tropical resort island of Bali said he would stop restaurants and hotels from serving them up for meals. "Officials will conduct operations at hotels, restaurants and other eating places, including those where turtles are usually butchered," Gov. Ida Bagus Oka said Friday, according to the Antara news agency.
FOOD
September 26, 1996 | LUCIENNE AARSEN
The Blue Orchid Satay House may sound like it's somewhere in the rain forests of Indonesia, but it's stuck between a lawn mower repair shop and an out-of-business nail salon on an ordinary commercial street in Arcadia. Still, once you enter this simple, informal place where the owner and his small daughter greet you at the door, the rich aromas of satay, nasi goreng and pecis (spiced meatballs) conjure up the markets in central Java's countryside.
FOOD
January 6, 2011 | By C. Thi Nguyen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
First, locate the tiny, unassuming entrance to Little London Cafe, a long, narrow, white linoleum corridor of a diner in the middle of the San Gabriel Valley's Chinese food paradise. A sign outside claims that the restaurant specializes in fish and chips. Ignore this sign. Inside, you will be presented with a laminated, black menu that lists pedestrian fish and chips and Americanized teriyaki bowls. Ignore this also. Ask for the Kalimantan menu. There may be some confusion because some of the servers, though extraordinarily sweet and accommodating, speak very little English.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Restaurants, the Westwood-based owner of the Love's chain of barbecue eateries, has decided that where there's smoke, there's profit. But United Restaurants is betting its corporate dollars on another kind of smoke--not produced by hickory wood but by cigars, preferably expensive ones. United Restaurants is expanding into New York and Washington, D.C., with its 18-month-old Beverly Hills experiment in the recently trendy world of cigar smoking, the Grand Havana Room.
TRAVEL
November 2, 1986 | PAUL LASLEY and ELIZABETH HARRYMAN, Lasley and Harryman are Beverly Hills free-lance writers.
"Indonesians like to eat with their fingers," said our hostess, Suzanne Suwanda. "They think that the food tastes better if they can feel it, get the texture of it, feel how warm it is." We were sitting in the Satay House Senayan restaurant in Jakarta. As in most of the city's restaurants, spoons are available on request, but we followed local custom and ate with our fingers.
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