Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRestaurants Israel
IN THE NEWS

Restaurants Israel

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 4, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small group of Israelis picketing outside the downtown Burger King the other day believe the corporate bosses of the fast-food chain made a whopper of a mistake. "It just tastes anti-Semitic!" the protesters chanted, waving their placards in the sunshine on a busy pedestrian mall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small group of Israelis picketing outside the downtown Burger King the other day believe the corporate bosses of the fast-food chain made a whopper of a mistake. "It just tastes anti-Semitic!" the protesters chanted, waving their placards in the sunshine on a busy pedestrian mall.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 27, 1999 | From Reuters
Burger King Corp., facing a worldwide boycott by Arab and Muslim groups, said Thursday that it is pulling out of a fast-food outlet in an Israeli settlement in the disputed West Bank. An executive of Burger King, a unit of British food and beverage group Diageo, said the Miami-based company had been misled about the site of the outlet owned by a franchisee and would not have allowed it to open in the Maale Adumim neighborhood.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1999 | From Reuters
Burger King Corp., facing a worldwide boycott by Arab and Muslim groups, said Thursday that it is pulling out of a fast-food outlet in an Israeli settlement in the disputed West Bank. An executive of Burger King, a unit of British food and beverage group Diageo, said the Miami-based company had been misled about the site of the outlet owned by a franchisee and would not have allowed it to open in the Maale Adumim neighborhood.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace negotiations with Syria may be stalled, and talks with the Palestinians are proceeding at a snail's pace. Israel's decision to confiscate Arab-owned land in Jerusalem has mushroomed into a diplomatic crisis with the Arab states, and Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's government faces a parliamentary no-confidence vote next week that it may lose. But all is not gloomy in the Holy City.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2003 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Zubin Mehta is yawning. The combined effects of jet lag and staying up to catch a lunar eclipse in the dead of night have left him bleary-eyed and a tad disheveled. But somnolence quickly gives way to his characteristic ebullience when the maestro talks about his coming U.S. tour -- including stops this week in Los Angeles and Costa Mesa -- with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, for which he holds the lofty title of music director for life.
OPINION
September 17, 1995 | SARAH SHAPIRO, Sarah Shapiro is a Jerusalem-based writer who grew up in Los Angeles
King David never wrote psalms about them. The Jewish soldiers in the Six-Day War, fighting to recapture from Jordan the ancient Temple's Western Wall, weren't longing for them. And the Oslo accord was signed, sealed and delivered without any reference to cheeseburgers. Even when Burger King opened a Jerusalem franchise a few years back, followed shortly by a Wendy's, there was nary a cheeseburger in the Holy City.
FOOD
July 8, 1993 | FAYE LEVY
Coleslaw was not high on my list of favorite dishes when I was growing up in Maryland. The mayonnaise dressings with heavy doses of sugar simply didn't appeal to me. But years later, when I was a young bride in Israel, trying to learn how to cook from books, I decided to try to make a batch. One of the books on my shelf, the 1963 edition of "The Good Housekeeping Cookbook," had 17 different versions of coleslaw. There had to be one I would like!
OPINION
April 15, 2004 | Adam Shatz
"The violence we are seeing in Iraq is familiar," President Bush argued, with seductive simplicity, in Tuesday's press conference. "The terrorist who takes hostages or plants a roadside bomb near Baghdad," he continued, "is serving the same ideology of murder that kills innocent people on trains in Madrid and murders children on buses in Jerusalem and blows up a nightclub in Bali and cuts the throat of a young reporter for being a Jew.
FOOD
March 26, 2003 | James Ricci, Times Staff Writer
WINEGROWING is an act of hope. People who engage in it have to be optimists, trusting that over the years their vines will strengthen, their fruit will improve, their wines will age into more harmonious creations. Optimism of any kind, you would think, must be in short supply in Israel these days, what with that country's economy limping, the intractable conflict with the Palestinians harrowing everyday life and the American war on Iraq thundering in the region.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|