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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1999
Two armed men forced their way into a popular Mid-City restaurant early Friday, holding employees at gunpoint while emptying a safe and cash registers of about $20,000, said Police Department officials. No one was hurt during the 4:45 a.m. incident at Roscoe's House of Chicken 'N Waffles in the 5000 block of West Pico Boulevard. The robbers fled and remain at large. Roscoe's employees declined to comment on the incident. The restaurant opened as usual at 8 a.m. on Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Chasen's restaurant, where Ronald Reagan proposed to his second wife and Jimmy Stewart held his bachelor party, served up one last helping of Hollywood lore on Sunday. The famed Beverly Hills gathering place for the movie industry's mightiest, which closed in 1995, auctioned its restaurant equipment and nearly 60 years of memorabilia. A photograph of Frank Sinatra and friends at Chasen's sold for $250. An autographed picture of comedian Jerry Lewis went to a bidder for $225.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
This being Los Angeles, it probably is only a matter of time until somebody introduces the notion of "geographic karma." When they do, Exhibit A might be the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division station, which happens to sit on exactly the same spot as the Roost Cafe, once one of the city's most notorious gangland hangouts.
NEWS
June 28, 1999 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mr. Chow has been serving high-rent Chinese food on Camden Drive in Beverly Hills since 1973. But a few years ago, the restaurant, which has branches in New York and London, got undeniably, mysteriously hot. Hot as in people waiting hours for a table. Hot as in celebrities packing the room every night. Five evenings a week, the man who must control the sizzling dining room, which seats a maximum of 90, is affable 33-year-old Briton Chris Benton.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half an hour before the lunch rush, the health inspector has made a surprise visit to the Daily Grill in Studio City. Flashlight and thermometer in hand, he tests the temperature of the meatloaf gravy, searches for crud under the grill and scouts the cooler for vermin that would jeopardize the bright blue "A" in the eatery's front window. But the guy in the white lab coat doesn't work for the local health department.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1999 | ROBIN RAUZI
If there's nothing more American than baseball and apple pie, why don't they serve apple pie at baseball games? Because baseball stadiums are the hard-core turf of hot dogs and beer. So as the Dodgers and Angels take up their bats, take a tour of spots related to the two Major League food groups. Friday Microbreweries are nice, but let's face it, to quench Americans' massive thirst for beer--we consume about 6 billion gallons a year--we need megabreweries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to close a contentious chapter in the history of Koreatown, community leaders announced Wednesday the formation of a mediation and arbitration panel to handle disputes between restaurant owners and their workers. "We are making history," said Young-Seok Suh, president of the Korean American Federation of Los Angeles, whose office played a key role in bringing the feuding sides to the table.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1999 | JESUS SANCHEZ, commercial real estate reporter
In the days of junk bond kings and yellow power ties, Stepps restaurant in downtown Los Angeles reigned supreme as the place where young professionals exchanged business cards and glances while sipping Coronas topped with lime wedges. But the yuppies of tomorrow will have to find another watering hole. After nearly 15 years atop Bunker Hill, Stepps will shut down on March 28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Bobby's Coffee Shop on Ventura Boulevard, a greasy breakfast joint that's still packin' 'em in after more than 50 years, Mary Wood, as usual, is hard at work. She shuffles from table to table in her white New Balance sneakers, taking her orders, usually with little more than eye contact or verbal shorthand. "Ready?" Mary asks one diner. He nods in the affirmative. "The usual," he says. Two poached eggs. Wheat toast, Mary scribbles. That would be Buddy.
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