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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1991 | JON NALICK
For the MacDonald family the best things in life aren't free; they cost exactly $1.50. That's the price of coney islands--hot dogs covered with chili and smothered in onions--at the Lafayette Coney Island in downtown Detroit, and the MacDonalds will travel hundreds of miles to get them. On Saturday, Huntington Beach resident Hugh MacDonald, 55, and nine other family members--ranging in age from 17 to 72--gathered there to have coneys for the first time in years.
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NEWS
January 23, 1991 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fast-food restaurant owned by a Palestinian-American who has openly opposed U.S. military intervention in the Persian Gulf was destroyed by arson Tuesday, Michigan state police reported. "It's arson. There's no question about that," said Sgt. John Fatchett of the state fire marshal's office. Fatchett said the investigation would likely continue for several weeks. Kareem Khoury, a U.S.
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NEWS
January 23, 1991 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fast-food restaurant owned by a Palestinian-American who has openly opposed U.S. military intervention in the Persian Gulf was destroyed by arson Tuesday, Michigan state police reported. "It's arson. There's no question about that," said Sgt. John Fatchett of the state fire marshal's office. Fatchett said the investigation would likely continue for several weeks. Kareem Khoury, a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1991 | JON NALICK
For the MacDonald family the best things in life aren't free; they cost exactly $1.50. That's the price of coney islands--hot dogs covered with chili and smothered in onions--at the Lafayette Coney Island in downtown Detroit, and the MacDonalds will travel hundreds of miles to get them. On Saturday, Huntington Beach resident Hugh MacDonald, 55, and nine other family members--ranging in age from 17 to 72--gathered there to have coneys for the first time in years.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1987 | Associated Press
Elias Bros. Restaurants Inc. of Detroit, which operates 238 Big Boy Restaurants in two states and Canada, has purchased franchise rights to the 914-unit Big Boy system from Marriott Corp., company officials say. The Big Boy system, acquired by Marriott in 1967, has operations in 39 states, Canada and Japan and estimated annual sales between $950 million and $1 billion. No value was place on the purchase, which did not include the California restaurants. Elias Bros.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2002 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Burger King Corp. has been sold by its parent company to a buyout team for $2.26 billion in cash, a development that could help the nation's No. 2 burger chain stabilize operations and boost market share, analysts said. British liquor company Diageo sold the chain to a consortium led by Texas Pacific Group, a Fort Worth buyout outfit that holds a majority stake in such companies as J. Crew Group Inc. and America West Airlines.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
The loud checkered overalls of Bob's Big Boy could soon stop blaring down at California hamburger lovers. Marriott Corp., which owns the Glendale-based chain, confirmed Thursday that it is converting a handful of the coffee shops into a new "family restaurant concept," without the famous statues of a smiling, chubby boy with his thumbs tucked into the suspenders on his red-and-white overalls.
FOOD
December 10, 1987 | BARBARA HANSEN, Times Staff Writer
The breakfast was wonderful. It started with a flute of golden Champagne, the tiny bubbles vigorously pummeling their way to the top. Next came slices of ham, lightly fried and brushed with Alaga syrup from Alabama. A pat of butter melted into a deep yellow pool in the center of a big serving of grits. Then there were eggs, cooked to order, and the lightest imaginable biscuits brought hot and steaming from the oven. This "morning" feast has turned night into day at Cyril's of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Tens of thousands of concertgoers in Chicago were forced to evacuate the city's Lollapalooza as severe storms descended upon the city Saturday. Music was halted about 3:30 p.m. CST, and many fans were directed to one of three underground parking garages designated as "emergency evacuation shelters. " Fans were told to leave the Grant Park festival about one hour before the storms hit. All told, Lollapalooza was shut down for just under three hours.  "Due to an approaching storm and warnings from the National Weather Service, Lollapalooza organizers have suspended the festival until further notice," read a statement posted Saturday afternoon on Lollapalooza's official site.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | SIMON ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Aracelli Gonzalez first felt the touch of a bull's horn on her lower abdomen, she thought nothing of it. Not when the crowd in the Guadalajara bull ring screamed in anticipation and the bull began to charge again. Not even when the bull's horn tore through her skin and drew blood, further exciting the crowd--the haves comfortably ensconced in their shaded seats, the have-nots holding their palms to the sky in denial of the sun.
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