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Restaurants North Carolina

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NEWS
November 27, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, shopkeepers and residents of this dowdy, semi-rural city adjoining Ft. Bragg had a classic love-hate feeling for the troops who were stationed here--not far removed from the "soldiers-and-dogs-keep-out" mentality of military towns in years past. But these days, people are far more conciliatory about the paratroopers who are home-based here, and store windows along Bragg Boulevard sport new placards with far more caring messages.
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NEWS
November 27, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, shopkeepers and residents of this dowdy, semi-rural city adjoining Ft. Bragg had a classic love-hate feeling for the troops who were stationed here--not far removed from the "soldiers-and-dogs-keep-out" mentality of military towns in years past. But these days, people are far more conciliatory about the paratroopers who are home-based here, and store windows along Bragg Boulevard sport new placards with far more caring messages.
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NEWS
February 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
The dramatic lunch counter sit-in 30 years ago that helped ignite the 1960s civil rights movement surprised everyone, even the four black participants who re-enacted it Thursday at Woolworth. "We were scared," recalled Franklin McCain, one of the four college students who staged the first lunch counter sit-in on Feb. 1, 1960. "All I wanted was a Coke and a doughnut."
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
The dramatic lunch counter sit-in 30 years ago that helped ignite the 1960s civil rights movement surprised everyone, even the four black participants who re-enacted it Thursday at Woolworth. "We were scared," recalled Franklin McCain, one of the four college students who staged the first lunch counter sit-in on Feb. 1, 1960. "All I wanted was a Coke and a doughnut."
BUSINESS
November 4, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Two hurricanes apparently have taken a bite out of CKE Restaurants Inc.'s stock. The Anaheim-based company's shares fell almost 10% Tuesday amid concern that the hurricanes cut sales more than expected at Hardee's fast-food restaurants in North Carolina and along the Gulf of Mexico. Hardee's is the company's biggest chain, with almost 3,000 locations. CKE shares fell $2.63 to $25 in trading of 1.29 million, more than double the three-month daily average volume.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wilbur Hardee, an entrepreneur who founded the Hardee's restaurant chain in 1960 with a drive-in hamburger stand near the East Carolina University campus in Greenville, N.C., has died. He was 89. Hardee died Friday in Greenville of unspecified causes, according to St. Louis-based CKE Restaurants, which operates 1,900 Hardee's across the Midwest and Southeast and in 200 international locations. The Hardee's franchise has become a mainstay for CKE, which has seen sales and profits rise in recent years based on a strategy of giving customers what they want -- even if that happens to be a patently overindulgent Monster Thickburger with 1,420 calories and 107 grams of fat. Hardee's first drive-in restaurant didn't have tables or carhops, but it built a loyal following of customers who stopped in for 15-cent hamburgers cooked on a charcoal broiler.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
No-smoking rules will be everywhere by 2020, predicts the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, if the rate of new laws banning smoking in restaurants, bars and private worksites continues.  Already, 25 states and the District of Columbia have bans in those locations, up from zero states in 2000. So in the next 10 years, the other half of the country seems likely to join them. But maybe not the South. The CDC writes in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report :  “Regional disparities remain in policy adoption, with no southern state having adopted a smoke-free law that prohibits smoking in all three venues.” Some Southern states are close—Florida and Louisiana have restrictions in worksites and restaurants but not bars.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | JANE APPLEGATE
In these tough times, when every penny counts, small-business owners may be reluctant to spend money to train employees beyond the basics of doing the job. But the money you invest in employee training now quickly reappears on your bottom line, according to experts. "Training is a morale and a performance booster," said Curtis Plott, executive vice president of Alexandria, Va.-based American Society for Training and Development.
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