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BUSINESS
November 17, 1990 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to fuel expansion, Carl Karcher Enterprises Inc. said Friday it plans to sell 57 company-owned Carl's Jr. restaurants in Northern California to franchisees over the next two years. "Our franchise strategy will greatly enhance the company's long-term growth, spread the challenge of developing properties and raising capital, and cushion the volatility of economic cycles," said President and Chief Operating Officer Donald F. Karcher. According to the plan, all Carl's Jr.
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NEWS
April 10, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
If Frank Fat had kept his real name--Dong Sai-Fat--he might not have become a living historical landmark. "Dong's" as a restaurant name just would not have had the ring--the delicious absurdity--of "Fat's." Same for his phony illegal immigrant name, Wong. Sounds more like a grocery. But it was part of the man's innate genius that as a struggling young immigrant from Canton, China, he named himself Frank Fat. Recalls his son, Wing Fat: " 'Frank Fat' just fit."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The NAACP is investigating a complaint by a group of black students who say they were denied service at a Denny's restaurant when they refused to pay a cover charge and to settle their meal bills in advance. A spokeswoman for the restaurant chain said the prepayments were intended to prevent customers from leaving without paying--an ongoing problem at the restaurant when the incident occurred. She denied that any discrimination took place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The NAACP is investigating a complaint by a group of black students who say they were denied service at a Denny's restaurant when they refused to pay a cover charge and to settle their meal bills in advance. A spokeswoman for the restaurant chain said the prepayments were intended to prevent customers from leaving without paying--an ongoing problem at the restaurant when the incident occurred. She denied that any discrimination took place.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
If Frank Fat had kept his real name--Dong Sai-Fat--he might not have become a living historical landmark. "Dong's" as a restaurant name just would not have had the ring--the delicious absurdity--of "Fat's." Same for his phony illegal immigrant name, Wong. Sounds more like a grocery. But it was part of the man's innate genius that as a struggling young immigrant from Canton, China, he named himself Frank Fat. Recalls his son, Wing Fat: " 'Frank Fat' just fit."
BUSINESS
November 17, 1990 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to fuel expansion, Carl Karcher Enterprises Inc. said Friday that it plans to sell 57 company-owned Carl's Jr. restaurants in Northern California to franchisees over the next two years. Analysts said franchising will allow Carl's to expand faster in Northern California because franchisees will pay for new construction. But the plan depends on Carl's ability to arrange financing for its franchisees, according to a restaurant consultant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2010
Political party: Democrat Occupation: San Francisco mayor Age: 43, born in San Francisco City of residence: San Francisco Personal: Wife, actress Jennifer Siebel Newsom; 13-month-old daughter, Montana Education: Bachelor's degree in political science, Santa Clara University Career highlights: Served on San Francisco Board of Supervisors and on Parking and Traffic Commission. Legalized gay marriage in San Francisco. Approved city's universal healthcare program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1996 | DAVID R. BAKER
The City Council has picked an architectural designer and three-year Moorpark resident to fill the Planning Commission spot left open by resigning Commissioner Ted Martens. Paul Norcross, a consultant with the Vigen Associates architecture and planning firm, may begin his new duties by the end of August, commission Chairman John Torres said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA
Plans for the second restaurant project to go before the Planning Commission this month will be up for approval today. Developers want to see one of a chain of family eateries known as Chevys Mexican Restaurants built on an eight-acre site at Las Ramblas and Puerta Real, near Crown Valley Parkway.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1990 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Carl Karcher Enterprises is a company known for wearing its patriotism on its sleeve--or at least its windows. For years, the company has stuck large decals of Old Glory on the front windows of its Carl's Jr. restaurants. And now, the stickers have all but disappeared. A sign of flagging interest in the American dream? Hardly. The Anaheim-based chain has installed a flagpole at 349 of its older locations in Southern California.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1990 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to fuel expansion, Carl Karcher Enterprises Inc. said Friday it plans to sell 57 company-owned Carl's Jr. restaurants in Northern California to franchisees over the next two years. "Our franchise strategy will greatly enhance the company's long-term growth, spread the challenge of developing properties and raising capital, and cushion the volatility of economic cycles," said President and Chief Operating Officer Donald F. Karcher. According to the plan, all Carl's Jr.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1992 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carl Karcher Enterprises Inc., which runs the Carl's Jr. fast-food chain, said Friday that the recession contributed to the drop in profit for the third quarter. It reported earnings of $1.3 million, or 7 cents a share, down from $1.9 million, or 11 cents a share, for the same period last year. Revenue also dropped. The chain took in $112.8 million during its third quarter, which ended Nov. 2. A year earlier, third-quarter revenue was $123.6 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1991
Where should public officials draw the line when it comes to banning smoking in public places to protect public health? Should it be in restaurants, as the general approach now seems to be, or in all public places? If bans are considered in restaurants, should there be some arbitrary limit, such as setting aside 40% or 50% of the tables for nonsmokers? Or should it be an all-or-nothing proposition--either banning smoking entirely or leaving it up to each establishment to decide?
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