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November 12, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Red Robin Bobs East: Red Robin International, the restaurant chain based in Irvine, plans to open its first eatery in the East. A Red Robin Burger & Spirits Emporium will open next year in South Whitehall Township, near Allentown, Pa. The franchised restaurant has expanded recently into several states, among them Georgia, New Mexico, Nebraska, North Carolina and Utah.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Red Robin Bobs East: Red Robin International, the restaurant chain based in Irvine, plans to open its first eatery in the East. A Red Robin Burger & Spirits Emporium will open next year in South Whitehall Township, near Allentown, Pa. The franchised restaurant has expanded recently into several states, among them Georgia, New Mexico, Nebraska, North Carolina and Utah.
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NEWS
March 3, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shootings this week at a grammar school in Michigan and fast-food restaurants in Pennsylvania have prompted lawmakers to renew efforts to break a congressional deadlock on gun legislation. Challenged by President Clinton on NBC-TV's "Today" show, four senior Republican and Democratic lawmakers agreed to meet at the White House on Tuesday. The congressional delegation will include Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) and Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The franchiser of the Big Boy restaurant chain has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, the company said Friday. Elias Bros. Corp. also said it will sell the company to investor Robert G. Liggett Jr. The Warren, Mich.-based chain includes 455 Big Boy eateries. The purchase price was not disclosed but will be made public next week, said Anthony Michaels, Elias' chief executive. The sale is subject to approval by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | From United Press International
Americans flocked to beaches, relaxed at back yard cookouts and attended parades and ceremonies Sunday to honor labor on the last summer holiday weekend. In Pennsylvania's Westmoreland County, officials of the United Mine Workers and the United Steelworkers participated in ceremonies designating the grave of murdered labor organizer Fannie Sellins as a historic landmark.
SPORTS
January 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Washingtonians started to spill into the streets to hail the Super Bowl champion Redskins when their team led, 17-0, at halftime. That was only a prelude, however, to the massive celebration that erupted once Washington had actually wrapped up its third Super Bowl championship in 10 years by beating Buffalo, 37-24. "It was just a matter of time," said 17-year-old Traci Sutton of suburban Bethesda, Md. "There was no doubt that our hometown Redskins would bring the trophy back to Washington.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1995 | ROBERT EISNER, Robert Eisner, the William R. Kenan Professor Emeritus at Northwestern University, is a past president of the American Economic Assn. and author of "The Misunderstood Economy: What Counts and How to Count It."
President Clinton's modest proposal to raise the minimum wage in two steps to $5.15 from its present $4.25 figure, set four years ago, has raised a chorus of objections. It would raise unemployment, we are told, by making it impossible for employers to hire low-productivity workers. Hence, it would hurt those it is intended to help.
NEWS
January 30, 1985 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Down by Benjamin Franklin's house, they have opened Benjamin's Casino. On South Street, a British woman in a trim tuxedo deftly deals for a $550 pot. And in Cavanaugh's scarred and smoky barroom, Nick Margas tells a lunch-bucket crowd, "Gentlemen, place your bets." The games are legalized blackjack and tournament poker, and under what may be the nation's loosest gaming law, Pennsylvania neither taxes nor regulates the play. By virtually all accounts, it was never supposed to happen.
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