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NEWS
June 24, 1987
San Francisco supervisors adopted an ordinance requiring restaurants to offer non-smoking areas to customers on demand, but it does not force restaurateurs to set aside a no-smoking section. "The general membership is really quite pleased that it is as flexible a law as it is," said Mildred Howie of the Golden Gate Restaurant Assn. "It's a very common-sense law."
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SPORTS
April 2, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
Part of the attraction of feasting at Big Nate's Barbeque is that, if your timing is right, you might just run into Big Nate himself. Or you might not. Owner and NBA legend Nate Thurmond regularly spends four days a week at his restaurant in San Francisco's working-class South of Market neighborhood, but mostly he keeps out of sight. "I have a thing about having a business where people come to see you," the Hall of Famer tells a visitor to his office/storage room above the eatery.
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BUSINESS
February 26, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
In San Francisco, the posh and proper restaurant Trader Vic's has always required men to wear jackets and ties. But customers balked, so several months ago it loosened the knot on its tie policy--although jackets are still a must. In Los Angeles, however, a far more laid-back Trader Vic's has never required jackets and ties. In fact, owners say, in Los Angeles it's tough enough just to keep some customers from wearing tennis shorts into the dining room.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who's eating whose lunch around here? If you believe a story in the July 18 Newsweek ("S.F. Eats L.A.'s Lunch"), the seat of California's restaurant power has moved to San Francisco, the Los Angeles scene is dead and our best chefs are heading north. The evidence: L.A.'s recent spate of restaurant closings following several disasters--"a riot, earthquake, fires, recession," and a few L.A. chefs who "have decided to follow the money."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
There hasn't been a lot of recent restaurant news from San Francisco. This year Chez Panisse will celebrate its 19th birthday--Alice Waters' revolution has become mainstream. These days just about every restaurant in the Bay Area brags about its fresh, regional cuisine. There is Green's at Fort Mason--still the best vegetarian restaurant in the country. Square One serves original and eclectic food, the Hayes Street Grill is still the place to go for fish, and Masa is still Masa's without Masa.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1990 | KATHLEEN MACLAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the front of every bag of Casa Sanchez tortillas and chips is the proud logo of a boy in a sombrero astride an ear of yellow corn, its brown husk blowing in the breeze as it blasts through a starry sky. Although the design was adopted during the 1960s infatuation with space exploration, it is more than appropriate for the success of a skyrocketing Mexican food business that began when Robert Sanchez's grandparents arrived from south of the border in 1924.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A leaky propane tank on a dim sum cart exploded in a crowded Chinatown restaurant Wednesday, injuring at least 21 employees and customers and blowing out the front windows of the three-story building. Several other people, including pedestrians on crowded Stockton Street, were cut by flying glass and debris and treated at the scene without being taken to hospitals. Two firefighters were also injured.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who's eating whose lunch around here? If you believe a story in the July 18 Newsweek ("S.F. Eats L.A.'s Lunch"), the seat of California's restaurant power has moved to San Francisco, the Los Angeles scene is dead and our best chefs are heading north. The evidence: L.A.'s recent spate of restaurant closings following several disasters--"a riot, earthquake, fires, recession," and a few L.A. chefs who "have decided to follow the money."
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1987 | ROSE DOSTI, Rose Dosti is a Times staff writer.
WHEN ANNIE Somerville arrived in the late '70s at the Tassajara Zen Mountain Center Retreat in the Carmel Valley to study Zen Buddhism, she was immediately drawn to the kitchen where she prepared meals based on monastic precepts of vegetarianism for 60 students and their guests. Today the 34-year-old chef of Greens, a vegetarian restaurant in an old World War II warehouse on San Francisco Bay that is run by the Zen Center, is among the handful of world-class women chefs in the United States.
SPORTS
April 2, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
Part of the attraction of feasting at Big Nate's Barbeque is that, if your timing is right, you might just run into Big Nate himself. Or you might not. Owner and NBA legend Nate Thurmond regularly spends four days a week at his restaurant in San Francisco's working-class South of Market neighborhood, but mostly he keeps out of sight. "I have a thing about having a business where people come to see you," the Hall of Famer tells a visitor to his office/storage room above the eatery.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1990 | KATHLEEN MACLAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the front of every bag of Casa Sanchez tortillas and chips is the proud logo of a boy in a sombrero astride an ear of yellow corn, its brown husk blowing in the breeze as it blasts through a starry sky. Although the design was adopted during the 1960s infatuation with space exploration, it is more than appropriate for the success of a skyrocketing Mexican food business that began when Robert Sanchez's grandparents arrived from south of the border in 1924.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
There hasn't been a lot of recent restaurant news from San Francisco. This year Chez Panisse will celebrate its 19th birthday--Alice Waters' revolution has become mainstream. These days just about every restaurant in the Bay Area brags about its fresh, regional cuisine. There is Green's at Fort Mason--still the best vegetarian restaurant in the country. Square One serves original and eclectic food, the Hayes Street Grill is still the place to go for fish, and Masa is still Masa's without Masa.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
In San Francisco, the posh and proper restaurant Trader Vic's has always required men to wear jackets and ties. But customers balked, so several months ago it loosened the knot on its tie policy--although jackets are still a must. In Los Angeles, however, a far more laid-back Trader Vic's has never required jackets and ties. In fact, owners say, in Los Angeles it's tough enough just to keep some customers from wearing tennis shorts into the dining room.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1987 | ROSE DOSTI, Rose Dosti is a Times staff writer.
WHEN ANNIE Somerville arrived in the late '70s at the Tassajara Zen Mountain Center Retreat in the Carmel Valley to study Zen Buddhism, she was immediately drawn to the kitchen where she prepared meals based on monastic precepts of vegetarianism for 60 students and their guests. Today the 34-year-old chef of Greens, a vegetarian restaurant in an old World War II warehouse on San Francisco Bay that is run by the Zen Center, is among the handful of world-class women chefs in the United States.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A leaky propane tank on a dim sum cart exploded in a crowded Chinatown restaurant Wednesday, injuring at least 21 employees and customers and blowing out the front windows of the three-story building. Several other people, including pedestrians on crowded Stockton Street, were cut by flying glass and debris and treated at the scene without being taken to hospitals. Two firefighters were also injured.
NEWS
June 24, 1987
San Francisco supervisors adopted an ordinance requiring restaurants to offer non-smoking areas to customers on demand, but it does not force restaurateurs to set aside a no-smoking section. "The general membership is really quite pleased that it is as flexible a law as it is," said Mildred Howie of the Golden Gate Restaurant Assn. "It's a very common-sense law."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The city that considers itself the culinary capital of the West Coast may soon be getting a grading system that shows how clean -- or unclean -- its restaurants are. San Francisco Supervisor Chris Daly wants the city to adopt a letter grading system such as the one already used in Los Angeles County. Daly expects to make a formal proposal during a Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday. Restaurants that receive grades lower than a C would be subject to a hearing and face possible closure.
TRAVEL
September 10, 1995
There's nothing like a pier for fishing or taking in the view. Below is a sampling of California's best.
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