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Restaurants Singapore

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | MAX JACOBSON
Singapore Corner seems to be going through an identity crisis. It's your basic neighborhood daytime place, except that it can't decide whether to serve bacon and eggs and burgers to surf-hungry teens or nasi goreng to travel-savvy cosmopolitans. Singapore is arguably the food capital of Asia. It's a place where several cultures--Malay, Chinese, English, Dutch, Indonesian and Indian--coexist. Eating is such an obsession there that even the street hawkers run ads in the local newspapers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | MAX JACOBSON
Singapore Corner seems to be going through an identity crisis. It's your basic neighborhood daytime place, except that it can't decide whether to serve bacon and eggs and burgers to surf-hungry teens or nasi goreng to travel-savvy cosmopolitans. Singapore is arguably the food capital of Asia. It's a place where several cultures--Malay, Chinese, English, Dutch, Indonesian and Indian--coexist. Eating is such an obsession there that even the street hawkers run ads in the local newspapers.
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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Finding good food abroad, from top Paris restaurants to Singapore's street stalls, requires some planning, but how much? L.A. Times restaurant critic Jonathan Gold led a panel called "Tasting Tips Around the Globe" with food bloggers Cathy Chaplin, Tomo Kurokawa and Barbara Hansen on Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show . The panel discussion continues at 2:45 p.m. Sunday (today) with another hour-long discussion of food and travel. Chaplin, who writes a blog called Gastronomy , said she's a big fan of spreadsheets when planning a week of serious eating in, say, Paris.
TRAVEL
April 28, 1991 | JIM HUTCHISON, Hutchison is a free-lance writer living in Westmount, Canada.
The bent little Indian man made his way to our table and plunked down two big rectangles of just-cut banana leaf. A few moments later, another man arrived to scoop a handful of papadams (crispy lentil wafers) from a square metal tin. The parade continued with the condiment man ladling spicy potatoes and saffron rice onto the green waxy leaves that serve as plates.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2009 | Andrea Chang
The gig: Celebrity chef, restaurateur and television personality known for his fresh take on traditional Italian fare and his penchant for wearing orange Crocs. Mario Batali co-owns 15 restaurants in Los Angeles, Las Vegas and New York, including L.A. hot spots Pizzeria Mozza and Osteria Mozza, which he opened with business partners Nancy Silverton and Joe Bastianich. The ponytailed chef, who can be seen on the Food Network's "Iron Chef America" and other television programs, also touts a line of products including cookbooks and kitchenware.
TRAVEL
July 9, 1989 | LARRY HABEGGER and JAMES O'REILLY, Habegger and O'Reilly are free-lance writers living in Northern California .
World Travel Watch is a monthly report designed to help you make informed judgments about travel throughout the world. Because conditions can change overnight, always make your own inquiries before you leave home. In the United States contact the nearest passport agency office; abroad, check in with the nearest American embassy . Asia --Tibet: Tibet has reopened to foreign travelers, but only to groups of 10 or more. Special permits are required and must be obtained a month in advance.
FOOD
December 25, 2002 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Jeremiah Tower is back. Break out the Champagne and caviar (preferably vintage Krug from the mid-'50s and only osetra or sevruga -- but don't serve them together, the only thing to drink with caviar is iced vodka and it must be served on blini made with so much butter that the excess runs down your arm). Tower, one of the seminal chefs in the birth of modern California cooking, has always been a man of flamboyant but precise tastes.
FOOD
April 28, 2004 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
One hot, steamy afternoon in Singapore, I dropped into Bumbu, a Thai-Indonesian restaurant in an old district near the famous Sultan Mosque. I hardly noticed the charming colonial ambience of the small, dark room, nor the alluring dishes on the menu. All I could think about was quenching my thirst. A drink made with lemon grass caught my eye -- it sounded tropical and cooling.
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