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NEWS
August 6, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They said George Cohon couldn't do it. They said it at every step along the way. Back in 1976, when the ebullient president of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada first broached the notion of opening a branch in the Soviet Union, the skeptics said he could never cut a deal with the grim authorities in Moscow.
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BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | From Reuters
McDonald's Corp. said Wednesday that more than 25,000 Muscovites have responded to a single help-wanted ad in a newspaper seeking to fill 630 crew positions at the chain's first restaurant in Moscow. Applications are continuing to filter in, a spokesman said. The McDonald's restaurant on Pushkin Square is scheduled to open Jan. 31. It will be the fast-food giant's largest operation, seating 700 people indoors and 200 more outside and is expected to serve more than 15,000 customers a day.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Bryant Gumbel has called from the "Today" show in New York to make reservations. Visiting American businessmen plan to eat here every lunch and dinner. And, right at the moment, a member of Nancy Reagan's summit staff is here in person begging for a table. "But we're booked solid for tonight," whines Louisiana Cajun/Creole chef John Folse, who nevertheless writes down the reservation. Then he shrugs. "When the First Lady's staff asks to eat, we make room," he explains later.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
One day, perhaps, historians studying the fourth Reagan-Gorbachev summit will weigh the significance of the Great Burger War. They may see it as a textbook case of the underlying Soviet mistrust of Americans, or of the Kremlin's insatiable hunger for hard currency, or of a Dixie capitalist defending himself against Communist aggression. For now, this small saga of the American chef who threatened to barbecue in Red Square if he couldn't give away U.S.
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writer
Five Soviets are holed up in a western Chicago suburb collecting all sorts of delectable corporate secrets. No one is trying to stop them. In fact, the secrets are being served up faster than French fries at a drive-thru. "There aren't enough suitcases," said Mikhail Shelesnov, 33, to carry back all he has learned. Soon the group will return to Moscow to open the first McDonald's restaurant in the Soviet Union sometime after Jan. 1, an event seen as a palatable symbol of improved U.S.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They said George Cohon couldn't do it. They said it at every step along the way. Back in 1976, when the ebullient president of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada first broached the notion of opening a branch in the Soviet Union, the skeptics said he could never cut a deal with the grim authorities in Moscow.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | From Reuters
McDonald's Corp. said Wednesday that more than 25,000 Muscovites have responded to a single help-wanted ad in a newspaper seeking to fill 630 crew positions at the chain's first restaurant in Moscow. Applications are continuing to filter in, a spokesman said. The McDonald's restaurant on Pushkin Square is scheduled to open Jan. 31. It will be the fast-food giant's largest operation, seating 700 people indoors and 200 more outside and is expected to serve more than 15,000 customers a day.
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writer
Five Soviets are holed up in a western Chicago suburb collecting all sorts of delectable corporate secrets. No one is trying to stop them. In fact, the secrets are being served up faster than French fries at a drive-thru. "There aren't enough suitcases," said Mikhail Shelesnov, 33, to carry back all he has learned. Soon the group will return to Moscow to open the first McDonald's restaurant in the Soviet Union sometime after Jan. 1, an event seen as a palatable symbol of improved U.S.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
One day, perhaps, historians studying the fourth Reagan-Gorbachev summit will weigh the significance of the Great Burger War. They may see it as a textbook case of the underlying Soviet mistrust of Americans, or of the Kremlin's insatiable hunger for hard currency, or of a Dixie capitalist defending himself against Communist aggression. For now, this small saga of the American chef who threatened to barbecue in Red Square if he couldn't give away U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Bryant Gumbel has called from the "Today" show in New York to make reservations. Visiting American businessmen plan to eat here every lunch and dinner. And, right at the moment, a member of Nancy Reagan's summit staff is here in person begging for a table. "But we're booked solid for tonight," whines Louisiana Cajun/Creole chef John Folse, who nevertheless writes down the reservation. Then he shrugs. "When the First Lady's staff asks to eat, we make room," he explains later.
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