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TRAVEL
February 12, 2012
If you find Yelp and Urbanspoon - let alone Foodspotting - to be too much work when you're searching for great restaurants in a new town, try a robot. Name: Alfred Available for: Android, iPhone, iPad What it does: This app analyzes your likes and recommends restaurants based on your previous favorites. Cost: Free What's hot: You don't have to spend ages in its initial quiz for Alfred to figure out what you like. ("Hi. I'm Alfred!
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
Jonathan Gold, the Los Angeles Times' Pulitzer Prize-winning restaurant critic and self-proclaimed “belly of Los Angeles,” is selecting his 101 favorite restaurants for a special section to be published in The Times on May 23. And if you're lucky, you could get an advance peek and a sampling from some of those hot spots. On May 21, The Times and Gold are hosting Bite Nite, an intimate tasting event with more than 20 selected restaurants. A limited number of tickets are available, and they will be sold only to Times members, starting May 8. Lunchtime with Mr. Gold The featured restaurants cover the rich variety of food in Los Angeles and include Alma, Chichen Itza, Corazon y Miel, Cut, Guelaguetza, Hart & Hunter, Jitlada, Ink, La Casita Mexicana, Lucques, Meals by Genet, Mozza, Sqirl and  more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Steve HarveySpecial to the Los Angeles Times
Nobody knows why Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt decided to call his restaurant Don the Beachcomber. Maybe he just thought Ernest the Beachcomber wouldn't roll off the tongue quite as easily. In fact, as his Hollywood eatery and watering hole became famous in the years after its 1937 founding, he would change his own name, first to Donn Beach-Comber, then to Donn Beach. He would also play a key role in introducing Polynesian restaurants and tiki bars to America. "If you can't get to paradise, I'll bring it to you," Beach liked to say. As a young man, Beach had sailed around the globe, working odd jobs on steamships while developing a love for the South Pacific.
FOOD
July 18, 2007 | By Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
WHEN chef Christopher Blobaum was opening Wilshire restaurant in Santa Monica, he wanted to do the right thing, both culinarily and environmentally. He buys much of the restaurant's produce at local farmers markets and sources meat and fish carefully. He uses solar-heated water for dishwashing and low-output fluorescent lighting. The deck out back is made from recycled lumber (and is built in a way that preserves the property's existing mature trees). Tables are set with woven vinyl Chilewich placemats that can be rinsed and reused instead of white linen tablecloths that need to be washed and bleached.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Sick of being served a meal at your favorite restaurant against a backdrop of wailing phones, pulsating texts and gabby fellow diners? So are most other patrons. On average, 61% of American diners surveyed say it's inappropriate for restaurant customers to text, email, tweet or talk on their mobile phones while eating out, according to a new report from Zagat . That's down slightly from the last two years, when 63% of customers surveyed said phone use was a concern. Patrons are the least lenient in Connecticut, where 71% deemed such phone use to be a faux pas, according to the survey.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Jay Jones
Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay will open two restaurants next week along Las Vegas ' ever-glittering Strip. Gordon Ramsay Pub & Grill launches Tuesday at Caesars Palace , and Gordon Ramsay BurGR will open Dec. 22 at Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino . With Ramsay, a Scot who grew up in Stratford-on-Avon, at the helm, the Pub & Grill promises the feel and flavors of an authentic English eatery. It will be a restaurant serving dishes such as lamb T-bone and Cornish chicken and a pub with 36 beers on tap and 24 more in bottles.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Fourteen years after he became the face of the “Subway diet,” keeping the weight off still isn't easy for Jared Fogle. The Indianapolis resident spends 200 days a year on the road. He rarely stays in a city for more than 24 hours. He's used to delayed planes, crazy hours and tempting food court offerings. “It's brutal,” said Fogle, who was recently in Los Angeles to support Subway's collaboration with the new Disney film “Frankenweenie.” But the 34-year-old, who helped Subway become one of the first national restaurant chains to successfully market healthfulness, makes do. He exercises “fairly regularly” but is far from a fitness buff, he said.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Instead of battling supermarket crowds and cleaning gravy-drenched kitchens, 30 million Americans will rely on restaurants this year for at least part of their Thanksgiving meals. The National Restaurant Assn. said 14 million people will eat their holiday dinner at restaurants, while 16 million will get takeout for all or part of their feast. But restaurant eating on Turkey Day is expected to be down this year. The association forecast that 6% of people across the country will have the big meal at eateries, compared with 11% last year.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The coasts are for dining, but America's heartland is all about drinking. The metropolitan areas with the deepest concentration of restaurants are all on the East or West coasts, while booming bar scenes are mostly in and around the Midwest, according to a report this week from real estate site Trulia. San Francisco is the top dining town, with the most restaurants adjusted for population. With 39.3 restaurants per 10,000 households, the city by the bay has nearly 50% more eateries than second-ranked Fairfied County in Connecticut.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Houston has decided to ban smoking in restaurants. The City Council rejected a ban on all public smoking but voted 9-4 to prohibit lighting up in restaurants. The measure still permits smoking in bars. Seven states and several cities around the nation prohibit smoking in most indoor public places.
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