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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange lawyer convicted of stealing from his clients to pay his gambling debts was sentenced Friday to eight years in state prison and ordered to repay more than $300,000 to his victims. After asking unsuccessfully to delay sentencing for two weeks so he could care for his ailing wife, who was also convicted in the thefts, attorney Leonard Basinger, 56, was taken into custody in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Corina Knoll and Christopher Goffard
Four years after he became the face of municipal greed, Robert Rizzo broke his long silence Wednesday in a Los Angeles courtroom and asked a judge for mercy. The former Bell administrator was pale and baggy-eyed, and his thinning hair had turned gray. For many, there was hope that he would finally reveal how he engineered a brazen scheme to boost the salaries of top officials that left the working-class city tumbling toward bankruptcy. But in a small, halting, scratchy voice, Rizzo offered only the vaguest of apologies, and no details.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Lauryn Hill's sentence in her tax-evasion case has been postponed to May 6 because the singer had not yet paid restitution on the money she owes. She now has a two-week reprieve to gather the funds. The eight-time Grammy winner appeared in a New Jersey federal court Monday to receive her sentence on charges of not paying taxes on $1.8 million in earnings. She had entered a guilty plea to three counts of tax evasion in June 2012, admitting that she intentionally failed to file tax returns in 2005, 2006 and 2007.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A former Glendale councilman who pleaded guilty to embezzlement, perjury and filing false tax returns related to the loss of at least $304,000 from a local farmers market was sentenced Monday to one year in jail. John Drayman shook his head as he was handcuffed in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom, where Superior Court Judge Stephen Marcus called him a "disgraced" ex-mayor who had shown no remorse. "In common parlance, you're a crook," the judge said. After pleading guilty to the felony charges last month, Drayman was ordered to pay about $305,000 in restitution for losses tied to the Montrose farmers market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1990
Not to deny anyone's just due. But when does financial restitution begin for Native Americans and African-Americans, just as Japanese-Americans are having their day? ROBERT ROCCHIO Newport Beach
BUSINESS
December 23, 2001
I would like to see Congress go after the Enron executives who've hoarded millions and force them to make restitution out of their own pockets to the company's employees and stockholders who have lost everything. Barbara Mitchell Bakersfield There is no denying the extreme hardship that most Enron retirees will face because of the collapse brought on by highflying and questionable management practices of the corporate offices. My heart, along with the hearts of millions of others, goes out to these victims of corporate misadventure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The owner of a Pacific Heights building where a fatal dog mauling took place in 2001 has agreed to pay more than $200,000 in restitution and fines to several former tenants. Prosecutors had charged that Rudolph G. Koppl stole from tenants and failed to properly manage his properties, authorities announced Tuesday. The action against Koppl related to three buildings, including the one where Diane Whipple was killed in January 2001.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | TILLIE FONG, Times Staff Writer
More than a decade after California became the first state to routinely compensate victims of crime, the fund that supports the effort is rapidly running out of cash. Moreover, collecting money from criminal offenders--a key feature of the program--has proven to be a frustrating task that some agencies clearly would rather avoid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1988
An art dealer convicted of defrauding a collector of expensive artworks will not be sentenced until he pays the victim $650,000 in restitution, according to prosecutors. Sentencing for Douglas Chrismas, 43, was postponed Wednesday because Superior Court Judge Candace Cooper "wants to get the (restitution) money up front," Deputy Dist. Atty. Fred Stewart said. Chrismas, owner of Flow Ace Gallery in West Hollywood, is to return to court Jan. 6.
NEWS
March 27, 1986
A Manhattan Beach financier sentenced to six months in prison for masterminding what may have been the largest land swindle in U.S. history, does not have to pay restitution to the thousands of investors bilked by the scheme, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By David Zucchino
FT. BRAGG, N.C. - In a sentence so light it stunned even his lawyers, Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair was sentenced Thursday to a reprimand and no jail time for misusing his authority over a subordinate with whom he had a three-year adulterous affair, ending a tumultuous court-martial that focused national attention on the military's uneven response to sexual misconduct. A military judge ordered Sinclair, 51, to forfeit $20,000 in salary and pay restitution of $4,156 for misusing his government charge card.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
The parents of two slain USC graduate students from China called on the university Thursday to pay restitution and help their families set up a scholarship in the victims' names. It was their first statement to local media since Bryan Barnes, 21, pleaded guilty Wednesday to shooting 23-year-old engineering students Ying Wu and Ming Qu as they sat in a parked BMW about a mile west of the campus. Xiyong Wu, a police officer, and Wanzhi Qu, an insurance salesman, flew in from China to speak at the hearing, where they demanded the death penalty for the defendants.
OPINION
January 29, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When she was 8 years old, a Pennsylvania girl identified only as Amy was raped repeatedly by an uncle, who compounded the crime by photographing the encounters - some of which involved acts ordered up by consumers of child pornography - and sending the images out over the Internet. More than 70,000 copies have been found on various confiscated computers. The uncle went to prison in 1998 and was ordered to pay $6,325 in restitution to cover Amy's psychological treatment at the time, which helped her heal from the trauma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- More than a year after campaign treasurer Kinde Durkee was ordered to repay $10.5 million she embezzled from the accounts of dozens of politicians, including U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, federal officials say they have only been able to recover $94,468.60 from liquidation of her assets to go to restitution. In November 2012, Durkee was sentenced to eight years in federal prison and ordered to repay the money she stole from 77 victims, mostly politicians from California, including the campaign committees of Feinstein and Democratic Reps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
When Edgar M. Bronfman Sr. heard that the pope had honored Kurt Waldheim, the Austrian president he had exposed as an ex-Nazi complicit in war crimes, he fired off a note to the Vatican. Pope John Paul II making Waldheim a papal knight was "like giving a rotten structure a fresh coat of paint," the billionaire head of the World Jewish Congress wrote with his customary directness. He received no reply to his 1987 letter - but the same blunt approach helped him persuade the Soviets to allow Jewish emigration and the Swiss to acknowledge that their banks had swallowed up the life savings deposited by Holocaust victims.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
BOSTON - It's been decades since Boston mobster James "Whitey" Bulger helped murder 11 people and terrorize countless others, but his actions finally caught up to him Thursday: A federal judge sentenced him to two consecutive life terms plus five years, all but guaranteeing he will spend the rest of his life in prison. After reading a lengthy rebuke of Bulger, 84, and the names of the 11 people he was convicted of killing, U.S. District Judge Denise J. Casper imposed the sentence and ordered him to pay $19.5 million in restitution to the victims' families.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | Associated Press
A judge will consider whether former state Sen. Joseph Montoya is too poor to finish paying $40,000 in fines and restitution that resulted from his corruption conviction. The once-powerful lawmaker, who was released from prison last year, told a U.S. District Court judge Friday: "I was used to the perks and honorariums. It's been a constant struggle the last six years." Montoya, 57, said he had to pay college expenses for his children while he was in prison.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2003 | Tom Petruno and Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writers
Wracked by one of its worst scandals ever, Wall Street says it will change its ways and pay $1.4 billion to make amends. So what will it all mean for the average investor? Here are answers to some of the practical questions individuals may have about the scandal settlement with 10 major brokerages: Question: If I think I was cheated by brokerage practices in recent years, am I entitled to some restitution? Answer: In theory, yes. Federal regulators are setting up a $388-million fund for investor claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
The Orange County Fire Authority and a rescue worker injured trying to find a pair of missing Costa Mesa hikers are not crime victims and cannot seek restitution, a judge ruled Friday. The fire authority made a motion in Orange County Superior Court in the criminal case against one of the rescued hikers, Nicolas Cendoya, 20, who pleaded guilty to one felony count of methamphetamine possession in exchange for permission to enter a drug-diversion program for first-time offenders. The authority sought to recoup the $55,000 it spent on the search for Cendoya and Kyndall Jack, 19, both of whom attended Costa Mesa High School, after they went missing Easter weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Lauryn Hill's sentence in her tax-evasion case has been postponed to May 6 because the singer had not yet paid restitution on the money she owes. She now has a two-week reprieve to gather the funds. The eight-time Grammy winner appeared in a New Jersey federal court Monday to receive her sentence on charges of not paying taxes on $1.8 million in earnings. She had entered a guilty plea to three counts of tax evasion in June 2012, admitting that she intentionally failed to file tax returns in 2005, 2006 and 2007.
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