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Restless Legs Syndrome

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HEALTH
June 28, 2010
Two drugs are now approved to combat restless legs syndrome — the dopamine boosters Mirapex and Requip. In addition, some drugs approved for other conditions can be legally prescribed for RLS. These include Neurontin, a pain and anti-seizure medication, pain relievers such as oxycodone, codeine and methadone, and anti-anxiety drugs such as the benzodiazepines. An RLS patch and a new pill are under development but in their current forms were recently rejected by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
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NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
For middle-aged women, restless legs syndrome may come with an elevated risk of high blood pressure, researchers say. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by crawling sensations and repeated muscle twichings in one or both legs, and an uncontrollable urge to move them -- which may compel a person to walk in circles for hours at night.  Some health experts, as this earlier post points out , have doubted that it's a "syndrome worthy...
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NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
For middle-aged women, restless legs syndrome may come with an elevated risk of high blood pressure, researchers say. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by crawling sensations and repeated muscle twichings in one or both legs, and an uncontrollable urge to move them -- which may compel a person to walk in circles for hours at night.  Some health experts, as this earlier post points out , have doubted that it's a "syndrome worthy...
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
For those who believe their twitchy legs are an illness -- there's another pill for that. Restless legs syndrome -- in which creeping and tugging sensations make moving your legs an irresistible urge -- can now officially be treated with a seizure drug. The FDA approved gabapentin, or Horizant, on Thursday after two 12-week clinical trials showed it relieves the symptoms of restless legs syndrome, compared to a placebo. People with restless legs syndrome get the overwhelming urge to move their legs, especially after lying down. The condition is worst at night, and sufferers sometimes have to pace for hours to relieve the discomfort. The cause of the twitchiness is mostly unknown; some suspect genetics is at least partly to blame, but the condition also can occur with diseases such as kidney failure and diabetes and with certain medications.  But not all doctors and health experts agree the symptoms are an actual disorder or syndrome worthy of treatment (to the dismay of those with restless legs )
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Repeated muscle twitchings in the legs, a phenomenon known as restless legs syndrome, can damage the heart, possibly by interfering with sleep at night, researchers said Sunday. The condition, they found, is linked to a problem known as left ventricular hypertrophy, in which the wall of the heart becomes thicker, making pumping blood more difficult. Left ventricular hypertrophy, in turn, has been associated with an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. An estimated 12 million Americans are thought to suffer from restless legs syndrome, but there is controversy about whether it is a serious problem -- or even a real one. Some recent studies, however, have linked it to specific genes, indicating that it is a physiological phenomenon and not just a minor ailment.
SCIENCE
July 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have linked certain genes to restless legs syndrome, suggesting the twitching condition is biologically based and not an imaginary disorder. Research in the New England Journal of Medicine, linked a gene variation to nighttime leg-twitching. It involved people in Iceland and the United States. A second study in Nature Genetics identified the same variation and two others in Germans and Canadians with the syndrome.
HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
So the patient goes to a neurologist. Every night, he tells the doctor, he gets these creepy, crawly feelings in his legs as he starts to drift off to sleep. It's not pain, exactly, but an irresistible urge to move his legs. He gets up, does a few deep knee bends. That helps. The neurologist listens, riveted. But as soon as the patient goes back to bed, the creepy-crawlies start up again. Sometimes, his legs start kicking periodically too.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
For those who believe their twitchy legs are an illness -- there's another pill for that. Restless legs syndrome -- in which creeping and tugging sensations make moving your legs an irresistible urge -- can now officially be treated with a seizure drug. The FDA approved gabapentin, or Horizant, on Thursday after two 12-week clinical trials showed it relieves the symptoms of restless legs syndrome, compared to a placebo. People with restless legs syndrome get the overwhelming urge to move their legs, especially after lying down. The condition is worst at night, and sufferers sometimes have to pace for hours to relieve the discomfort. The cause of the twitchiness is mostly unknown; some suspect genetics is at least partly to blame, but the condition also can occur with diseases such as kidney failure and diabetes and with certain medications.  But not all doctors and health experts agree the symptoms are an actual disorder or syndrome worthy of treatment (to the dismay of those with restless legs )
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley
An institution in San Francisco for the last decade or so, "Christmas With the Webers" can now be experienced by local audiences at the Acme Comedy Theatre. A largely improvisational show about a dysfunctional family's cluelessly tacky holiday celebration, "Webers" features plenty of low humor, high spirits and unmitigated camp, including full-on drag turns in the female roles.
HEALTH
September 30, 2002
EDUCATION TUESDAY * "Options to Hysterectomy." Hoag Conference Center, 1 Hoag Drive, Newport Beach. 6:30 p.m. Free. Reservations. (800) 514-HOAG. TUESDAY and THURSDAY * "A Caregiver's Workshop: Creating a Partnership With Your Doctor When You Suspect Memory Problems," sponsored by the Alzheimer's Assn. Free. Reservations. On Tuesday at Active Adult Day Health Care, 2385 Pacific Ave., Long Beach. 2-3:30 p.m. (562) 426-7772. On Thursday at Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles, 12817 Victory Blvd.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Repeated muscle twitchings in the legs, a phenomenon known as restless legs syndrome, can damage the heart, possibly by interfering with sleep at night, researchers said Sunday. The condition, they found, is linked to a problem known as left ventricular hypertrophy, in which the wall of the heart becomes thicker, making pumping blood more difficult. Left ventricular hypertrophy, in turn, has been associated with an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. An estimated 12 million Americans are thought to suffer from restless legs syndrome, but there is controversy about whether it is a serious problem -- or even a real one. Some recent studies, however, have linked it to specific genes, indicating that it is a physiological phenomenon and not just a minor ailment.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010
Two drugs are now approved to combat restless legs syndrome — the dopamine boosters Mirapex and Requip. In addition, some drugs approved for other conditions can be legally prescribed for RLS. These include Neurontin, a pain and anti-seizure medication, pain relievers such as oxycodone, codeine and methadone, and anti-anxiety drugs such as the benzodiazepines. An RLS patch and a new pill are under development but in their current forms were recently rejected by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
SCIENCE
July 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have linked certain genes to restless legs syndrome, suggesting the twitching condition is biologically based and not an imaginary disorder. Research in the New England Journal of Medicine, linked a gene variation to nighttime leg-twitching. It involved people in Iceland and the United States. A second study in Nature Genetics identified the same variation and two others in Germans and Canadians with the syndrome.
HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
So the patient goes to a neurologist. Every night, he tells the doctor, he gets these creepy, crawly feelings in his legs as he starts to drift off to sleep. It's not pain, exactly, but an irresistible urge to move his legs. He gets up, does a few deep knee bends. That helps. The neurologist listens, riveted. But as soon as the patient goes back to bed, the creepy-crawlies start up again. Sometimes, his legs start kicking periodically too.
HEALTH
April 16, 2007 | Marci Crestani, Special to The Times
Plain and simple, I am a wannabe doctor. I practice medicine with my family and friends the way real doctors practice a golf swing with theirs. This addiction of mine is a leisure activity and my enabler is Google. With Google, you don't have to know how everything in the body works. You just have to know how Google works. Thanks to it, I managed to diagnose my dad with restless legs syndrome before it was a TV commercial.
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