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Restorative Justice

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SPORTS
August 9, 2009 | KURT STREETER
We've tried blame. We've tried shame. We've tried hard punishment. But on the doping-in-sports front, we're making very little real progress. Suspicion still reigns. Chemists remain ahead of the testers. Every other week there's a new bust. We've hit a wall. There are the athletes who get caught and then, invariably, smile and smirk, duck and dodge, taking as little responsibility as possible. There are those, like me, who feel moral outrage -- that altering the body this way should never be condoned.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Hannah Fry
The roughly dozen Corona del Mar High students accused of hacking into the school's computers to access tests and change grades are still facing the possibility of expulsion from the district, Newport-Mesa Unified officials confirmed Tuesday afternoon. The district made the clarification after published reports that Newport-Mesa was considering a disciplinary measure known as "restorative justice," the Daily Pilot reported. The district this school year moved away from the longtime zero-tolerance policy and began using restorative justice, which encourages students to develop empathy and understand the reasons for their actions.
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NEWS
November 11, 2007 | Cheryl Wittenauer, Associated Press
Bright-orange pumpkins are ripening in a 6-acre garden that provided a summer-long cornucopia of fresh vegetables for a food bank serving some of the poorest counties in Missouri. Cultivating and harvesting the bounty were inmates at Southeast Correctional Center, where the garden is located.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The Cyrus Cylinder sits dramatically lighted behind glass at the center of a dimmed gallery at the Getty Villa. But the splendorous setting, including walls painted a deep royal blue, can't dispel the notion that this may be the homeliest object ever to get star treatment in a major art museum. It's a 9-inch, straw-colored barrel made of cracked and broken clay, devoid of decorative interest. Horizontally tattooed with row after row of tiny cuneiform script that was etched into it 2,552 years ago, it calls to mind a corn cob that's been gnawed bare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Deep inside this infamous old prison, Patty O'Reilly stands before eight men doing hard time, her shoulders slumped, a man's gold wedding band hanging from a chain around her neck. Three of the inmates are sobbing. The others sit motionless on metal chairs, eyes locked on the small, sad woman in front of them. O'Reilly's words seep out. A ballet teacher from Sonoma, she has come to San Quentin to share a story -- about the killing of a husband and the trauma caused by that loss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Hannah Fry
The roughly dozen Corona del Mar High students accused of hacking into the school's computers to access tests and change grades are still facing the possibility of expulsion from the district, Newport-Mesa Unified officials confirmed Tuesday afternoon. The district made the clarification after published reports that Newport-Mesa was considering a disciplinary measure known as "restorative justice," the Daily Pilot reported. The district this school year moved away from the longtime zero-tolerance policy and began using restorative justice, which encourages students to develop empathy and understand the reasons for their actions.
SPORTS
August 15, 2009
Kurt Streeter's idea of restorative justice in baseball [Aug. 9] is nothing short of asinine. Most of us agree that performance-enhancing drugs should be eliminated in sports. One can argue that the penalties are not severe enough. The truth is, fame and fortune were the motive for taking drugs, and the punishment taxes both fame and fortune. Restorative justice fails to provide any further deterrent and would reduce the financial penalty as Streeter proposes it. Imagine if all unions advocated this reform for failed drug tests.
OPINION
January 21, 2005
Re "California Executes Confessed Murderer," Jan. 19: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's refusal to grant clemency to Donald Beardslee killed a human being. Unlike the cop-killing robot in the first "Terminator" movie, the terminators Schwarzenegger played in sequels avoided killing humans. It is morally wrong to kill a human being who is not threatening you. Schwarzenegger missed a golden opportunity to limit his killing to the movies, and to remind people that killings depicted in movies do not justify and should not incite killing in real life.
OPINION
May 13, 2012
Los Angeles County voters will soon select a new district attorney, and it likely will be their most consequential vote in years. It is hard to overstate the role that the top prosecutor of the nation's most populous county will have as California completely reinvents its justice system. Residents must demand a D.A. who will do his or her utmost to keep them safe, while at the same time embracing reform and ensuring smarter, and less costly, punishment and supervision of nonviolent criminals.
NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Robert Greene
So what's the deal with Carmen Trutanich, anyway? Is he the goofy but dangerous loose cannon, power-hungry crazy man that so many former supporters love to hate? Or is he the reform-oriented outsider who, in his own description, made a few high-profile missteps in his first few months because he was unfamiliar with the culture of City Hall, and then settled down to be a solid administrator of an office that dispenses sound advice to city leaders and prosecutes dangerous criminals and nuisance violators?
OPINION
May 13, 2012
Los Angeles County voters will soon select a new district attorney, and it likely will be their most consequential vote in years. It is hard to overstate the role that the top prosecutor of the nation's most populous county will have as California completely reinvents its justice system. Residents must demand a D.A. who will do his or her utmost to keep them safe, while at the same time embracing reform and ensuring smarter, and less costly, punishment and supervision of nonviolent criminals.
NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Robert Greene
So what's the deal with Carmen Trutanich, anyway? Is he the goofy but dangerous loose cannon, power-hungry crazy man that so many former supporters love to hate? Or is he the reform-oriented outsider who, in his own description, made a few high-profile missteps in his first few months because he was unfamiliar with the culture of City Hall, and then settled down to be a solid administrator of an office that dispenses sound advice to city leaders and prosecutes dangerous criminals and nuisance violators?
SPORTS
August 15, 2009
Kurt Streeter's idea of restorative justice in baseball [Aug. 9] is nothing short of asinine. Most of us agree that performance-enhancing drugs should be eliminated in sports. One can argue that the penalties are not severe enough. The truth is, fame and fortune were the motive for taking drugs, and the punishment taxes both fame and fortune. Restorative justice fails to provide any further deterrent and would reduce the financial penalty as Streeter proposes it. Imagine if all unions advocated this reform for failed drug tests.
SPORTS
August 9, 2009 | KURT STREETER
We've tried blame. We've tried shame. We've tried hard punishment. But on the doping-in-sports front, we're making very little real progress. Suspicion still reigns. Chemists remain ahead of the testers. Every other week there's a new bust. We've hit a wall. There are the athletes who get caught and then, invariably, smile and smirk, duck and dodge, taking as little responsibility as possible. There are those, like me, who feel moral outrage -- that altering the body this way should never be condoned.
SPORTS
May 27, 2009 | Mike Penner
There are those who say Cal Ripken Jr. and his streak of consecutive games played saved baseball after the World Series-obliterating strike of 1994. If so, a New York judge named Sonia Sotomayor had an assist. In the spring of 1995, major league players were still on strike and baseball's owners conducted spring training with replacement players, mostly longshot minor leaguers with little chance of reaching the majors any other way.
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | Cheryl Wittenauer, Associated Press
Bright-orange pumpkins are ripening in a 6-acre garden that provided a summer-long cornucopia of fresh vegetables for a food bank serving some of the poorest counties in Missouri. Cultivating and harvesting the bounty were inmates at Southeast Correctional Center, where the garden is located.
SPORTS
May 27, 2009 | Mike Penner
There are those who say Cal Ripken Jr. and his streak of consecutive games played saved baseball after the World Series-obliterating strike of 1994. If so, a New York judge named Sonia Sotomayor had an assist. In the spring of 1995, major league players were still on strike and baseball's owners conducted spring training with replacement players, mostly longshot minor leaguers with little chance of reaching the majors any other way.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
With even Democrats expressing support for the nominee, the confirmation hearing today for Atty. Gen.-designate Michael B. Mukasey may seem short on drama. Over his 40-year career, Mukasey, 66, has left a rich paper trail of work from which lawmakers can judge his fitness to serve, and the onetime prosecutor, private lawyer and federal judge is viewed by members of both parties as well-qualified. "I like Judge Mukasey," Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Deep inside this infamous old prison, Patty O'Reilly stands before eight men doing hard time, her shoulders slumped, a man's gold wedding band hanging from a chain around her neck. Three of the inmates are sobbing. The others sit motionless on metal chairs, eyes locked on the small, sad woman in front of them. O'Reilly's words seep out. A ballet teacher from Sonoma, she has come to San Quentin to share a story -- about the killing of a husband and the trauma caused by that loss.
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