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Restraining Devices

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NATIONAL
December 8, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An elementary school principal in McGeehee, about 100 miles southeast of Little Rock, has been charged with battery against a minor for allegedly handcuffing an unruly 9-year-old student as a punishment. Alvis Hooks, 59, faces misdemeanor battery charges for allegedly bruising and cutting the wrist of the student, whom he forced to walk back to his classroom while handcuffed. Hooks will remain on suspension with pay until a court date in January, prosecutors said.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2008 | Rocco Parascandola, Newsday
Police and prosecutors have a new way to prevent domestic violence: Offenders now must wear an ankle bracelet that sets off an alarm when they get too close to their victims. The device uses cellphone triangulation and global positioning to alert authorities and battered women or other domestic violence victims if the wearer enters an "exclusion zone," usually the area around a victim's home, school or job.
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NATIONAL
April 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Pregnant prisoners in Arkansas will no longer be shackled while in labor, under a new state Department of Correction policy. Women considered risky will be held with soft restraints and all other pregnant prisoners will be under a guard's supervision. The changes follow a complaint by an inmate who gave birth and said she was shackled during much of her labor and chained again shortly after she had her baby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2006 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
In these dog days of August, lawmakers, hunters, animal advocates and the occasional celebrity are battling over whether to ban the tethering of canines in California. A measure that would generally bar tethering, on track to clear the Legislature as soon as next week, has set off a fierce debate about whether dogs chained for long periods of time are more likely to turn aggressive.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2008 | Rocco Parascandola, Newsday
Police and prosecutors have a new way to prevent domestic violence: Offenders now must wear an ankle bracelet that sets off an alarm when they get too close to their victims. The device uses cellphone triangulation and global positioning to alert authorities and battered women or other domestic violence victims if the wearer enters an "exclusion zone," usually the area around a victim's home, school or job.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of people across the nation have died after being restrained in psychiatric and mental retardation facilities in the last decade, the Hartford Courant reported. The newspaper's investigation confirmed 142 restraint-related deaths, many involving children, since 1988. The true death count may be three to 10 times higher because many cases are not reported to authorities, according to a statistical estimate commissioned by the Courant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A defendant jolted with 50,000 volts of electricity for interrupting a judge at his June sentencing hearing was awarded a new trial Friday. Long Beach Superior Court Judge Arthur Jean said he "reluctantly and regretfully" granted Ronnie Hawkins' request, adding that, because he was acting as his own lawyer, Hawkins should not have been thrown out of court during his three-strikes trial in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge issued a preliminary injunction Tuesday barring criminal defendants from being forced to wear stun belts in Los Angeles County courts. The belts, concealed under the clothing of potentially unruly defendants, are activated by remote control, delivering 50,000 volts of low-amperage electricity. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who won a new trial on theft charges after being shocked with a stun belt during a court appearance last summer was found guilty again Wednesday by a jury in Long Beach. Ronnie Charles Hawkins, 48, was convicted of petty theft with a prior conviction for the same offense, a felony that may qualify as his third strike under California law.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred in part by a Long Beach, Calif., judge's controversial use of a stun belt last June, Amnesty International on Tuesday unveiled a yearlong campaign targeting the use of "high-tech repression tools" by U.S. law enforcement officials. The human rights organization is calling for a ban on the use of electroshock devices and chemical sprays by law enforcement personnel until the physical consequences of their use is more fully examined. "Law enforcement officials . . .
NATIONAL
April 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Pregnant prisoners in Arkansas will no longer be shackled while in labor, under a new state Department of Correction policy. Women considered risky will be held with soft restraints and all other pregnant prisoners will be under a guard's supervision. The changes follow a complaint by an inmate who gave birth and said she was shackled during much of her labor and chained again shortly after she had her baby.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An elementary school principal in McGeehee, about 100 miles southeast of Little Rock, has been charged with battery against a minor for allegedly handcuffing an unruly 9-year-old student as a punishment. Alvis Hooks, 59, faces misdemeanor battery charges for allegedly bruising and cutting the wrist of the student, whom he forced to walk back to his classroom while handcuffed. Hooks will remain on suspension with pay until a court date in January, prosecutors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Long Beach man whose criminal case captured national attention when he was jolted in court with a 50,000-volt stun belt is appealing his 25-years-to-life sentence for petty theft received under the three-strikes law. Ronnie Hawkins, a 50-year-old with AIDS whose courtroom outbursts prompted the jolt, filed papers in Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday designed to win his release or a reduction in his sentence. The petition, filed by Venice civil rights attorney Steve Yagman, asks that Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who won a new trial on theft charges after being shocked with a stun belt during a court appearance last summer was found guilty again Wednesday by a jury in Long Beach. Ronnie Charles Hawkins, 48, was convicted of petty theft with a prior conviction for the same offense, a felony that may qualify as his third strike under California law.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced a new regulation Friday designed to prevent the use of inappropriate chemical and physical restraints on psychiatric patients, characterizing it as a sort of patients' bill of rights for the mentally ill. The new rule, which becomes effective in 60 days, was drafted in response to growing reports of abuses, some of which have resulted in deaths of patients, including children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge issued a preliminary injunction Tuesday barring criminal defendants from being forced to wear stun belts in Los Angeles County courts. The belts, concealed under the clothing of potentially unruly defendants, are activated by remote control, delivering 50,000 volts of low-amperage electricity. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amnesty International weighed in Monday in support of a $50-million civil rights lawsuit filed by a criminal defendant who was jolted with 50,000 volts of electricity during a courtroom confrontation with a Long Beach municipal judge. The London-based human rights organization said use of the remote-controlled stun belt could violate international treaties banning torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading punishment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Long Beach man whose criminal case captured national attention when he was jolted in court with a 50,000-volt stun belt is appealing his 25-years-to-life sentence for petty theft received under the three-strikes law. Ronnie Hawkins, a 50-year-old with AIDS whose courtroom outbursts prompted the jolt, filed papers in Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday designed to win his release or a reduction in his sentence. The petition, filed by Venice civil rights attorney Steve Yagman, asks that Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1998
The retrial of man suspected of burglary who got a court-ordered stun belt shock for speaking out of turn is set for Dec. 24. On June 30, just before he was to be sentenced for commercial burglary and petty theft, Ronnie Hawkins became the first Los Angeles County defendant to receive a jolt from an electronic security belt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A defendant jolted with 50,000 volts of electricity for interrupting a judge at his June sentencing hearing was awarded a new trial Friday. Long Beach Superior Court Judge Arthur Jean said he "reluctantly and regretfully" granted Ronnie Hawkins' request, adding that, because he was acting as his own lawyer, Hawkins should not have been thrown out of court during his three-strikes trial in April.
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