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Resuscitation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | KATE FOLMAR
Professional rescuers can brush up on their cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques at a class offered Saturday by the American Red Cross East Valley Division in Simi Valley. Called CPR for the Professional Rescuer, the advanced training class includes lessons in recognizing and caring for breathing and cardiac emergencies for adults and children, performing two-rescuer CPR, and using resuscitation equipment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
The term "code black" is the phrase used by physicians to describe a full emergency room. They could safely use the term to describe the crowded "Code Black" premiere at the Los Angeles Film Festival on Tuesday night. The film depicts the 2008 class of interns entering Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. The group is shown thrilling at all the action and direct patient interaction of C-booth, a 20-by-25-foot emergency room in which the most critical patients are treated. Soon, though, the old hospital is closed (it is not earthquake-safe)
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HEALTH
April 23, 2001
"Revive and Survive" will provide low-cost cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and certification at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Sunday. American Red Cross instructors will lead the three-hour sessions, which will begin every hour from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $5 in advance; $10 on-site. (800) 627-7000 or http://www.nbc4la.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2013 | Bloomberg News
John J. Byrne, whose turnaround of auto insurer Geico Corp. led billionaire Warren Buffett to buy the company and call him "the Babe Ruth of insurance," died March 7 at his home in Etna, N.H., according to Robert E. Snyder, a family spokesman. He was 80 and had prostate cancer. In his letter to Berkshire shareholders reviewing 1980, Buffett credited Byrne's "managerial brilliance" with resuscitating Geico after his arrival in 1976. "There aren't many Jack Byrnes in the managerial world, or Geicos in the business world," Buffett wrote.
NEWS
January 8, 1987
Two police officers Monday were given medals for lifesaving, the first such awards designated by the city to honor officers who help save a life while on duty. Officers Michael Ewing and Antonio Luna, in separate incidents, used mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to revive infants who had stopped breathing. The medals were given during a City Council presentation. Last February, Luna was dispatched to the home of a frantic mother whose son was beginning to turn blue.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
During cardiac arrest time is of the essence, but a longer period of cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be no better than a shorter one, a study finds. The study, released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine , compared outcomes of 9,933 cardiac arrest patients, about half of whom had 30 to 60 seconds of initial CPR from paramedics, or three minutes of the procedure, before heart rhythms were analyzed. In both groups, 5.9% of patients survived and were discharged from the hospital in acceptable health.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A lucky cat owes one of its nine lives to a firefighter who revived it with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Al Machado rescued the cat from a burning apartment Tuesday, telling the Standard Times of New Bedford, Mass., that he began performing mouth-to-mouth as he carried it outside. Video shot at the scene shows Machado bent over, breathing into the cat's mouth. The cat, a tiger angora, was revived and resting comfortably soon after. Asked what it tasted like to give mouth-to-mouth to a cat, Machado laughed, grimaced and said: "Like fur."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1985
The Los Angeles County Firefighters Union Friday called for a state law requiring that municipalities make mechanical and manual resuscitators available as protection against communicable diseases during rescues. The move stems from a May 19 episode in which a county firefighter administered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a suspected AIDS victim whose car had crashed off Topanga Canyon Boulevard.
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | Associated Press
The parents of the boy whose heart beat today in the chest of Baby Jesse in California lost another child three years ago when they found their 8-month-old son dead after he was left unattended in a bathtub. "It's just hard to accept why I had to lose two babies. It's hard to hang onto faith," said Deborah Walters, the mother of the boy whose heart was transplanted to the California child Tuesday at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Walters, 33, and Frank Clemenshaw Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1985 | G. M. BUSH, Times Staff Writer
Looking at 8-month-old Steven Christopher Dixon today, his parents find it hard to believe that less than two weeks ago the Westminster toddler had stopped breathing, had no heartbeat and was, in fact, clinically dead after crawling into the family swimming pool. No one knows exactly how long Steven was under water that Sunday afternoon. The guesses range from 15 to 30 minutes. Yet on Thursday, the baby was eating, laughing, rolling over--acting as if nothing serious had happened.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
During cardiac arrest time is of the essence, but a longer period of cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be no better than a shorter one, a study finds. The study, released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine , compared outcomes of 9,933 cardiac arrest patients, about half of whom had 30 to 60 seconds of initial CPR from paramedics, or three minutes of the procedure, before heart rhythms were analyzed. In both groups, 5.9% of patients survived and were discharged from the hospital in acceptable health.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A government program that helped homeowners finance and install green upgrades before a technical roadblock stalled it last year may be resuscitated by Congress. A group of legislators introduced a bill Wednesday to jump-start the Property Assessed Clean Energy program, known as PACE. The program made installations of energy-efficient solar panels, insulation and water conservation systems more affordable. More than half of the country had approved some version of the program in which local governments provided funding for home improvements.
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
This is a nation in mourning. With the fatal heart attack of 60-year-old former President Nestor Kirchner eight weeks ago, the country was cast into grief, its giant cities and tiny towns echoing with lamentations for a lost leader. " Nestor Vive " reads the graffito, sprayed again and again like a black armband wrapped tightly around the concrete walls of barrios both rich and poor. Nestor Lives. No one has suffered more than Kirchner's widow, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, who is also Argentina's current president.
WORLD
November 11, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton met for two hours in New York on Thursday as Israeli officials sought to develop their own proposal to rescue faltering Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. As they tried to resuscitate a round of Mideast negotiations that has been on the edge of collapse for weeks, Netanyahu and Clinton also discussed this week's U.S.- Israel clash over Jewish construction in disputed East Jerusalem. The new Mideast talks officially began Sept.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey
President Obama's campaign to overhaul the nation's healthcare system is officially on the back burner as Democrats turn to the task of stimulating job growth, but behind the scenes party leaders have nearly settled on a strategy to salvage the massive legislation. They are meeting almost daily to plot legislative moves while gently persuading skittish rank-and-file lawmakers to back a sweeping bill. This effort is deliberately being undertaken quietly as Democrats work to focus attention on more-popular initiatives to bring down unemployment, which the president said was a priority in his State of the Union address on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Los Angeles pharmaceutical billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong announced plans Wednesday to provide University of California regents with a $100-million guaranty underwriting the county's latest proposal to reopen long-troubled Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital by 2012. County officials have expressed misgivings about Soon-Shiong's efforts to reopen the hospital in the past. But he said the funding from his family foundation comes "with no strings attached" and is intended to reassure university officials hesitant to reopen the hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe DiMaggio Jr., the only child of baseball great Joe DiMaggio, died late Friday at a hospital in the Northern California town of Antioch, apparently of natural causes, hospital officials said Saturday. He was 57. He was the only son of DiMaggio and Dorothy Arnold, an actress whom the sports legend married in 1939. The athlete had no children with his second wife, Marilyn Monroe. The younger DiMaggio was estranged from his father and had seen him infrequently over the last few years.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | From Times wire services
The government today announced the recall of a faulty resuscitator that has gained widespread use in part due to the AIDS epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration asked hospitals, emergency rescue personnel and other medical facilities to return the Pulmanex Manual resuscitators to the manufacturer, Life Design Systems Inc. of Carrollton, Tex. A valve on the devices can become dislodged and prevent air from reaching patients, the FDA warned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Shelby Singleton, a maverick country music mogul and talent scout who launched the careers of Roger Miller and Ray Stevens before resuscitating the fabled Sun Records label to give new life to recordings by 1950s Sun discoveries including Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis, has died. He was 77. Singleton died Wednesday in Nashville following a battle with brain cancer. He had been admitted to St. Thomas Hospital a week earlier after suffering a seizure, his longtime friend and associate Jerry Kennedy said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2009 | Associated Press
Photographer Rocco Morabito, whose shot of a utility worker saving the life a fellow lineman who had been shocked by a high-voltage wire won a Pulitzer Prize in 1968, died Sunday. He was 88. Morabito's health had been declining and he was in hospice care, the Florida Times-Union reported. His dramatic photograph, tagged "Kiss of Life" by a Jacksonville Journal copy editor, appeared in newspapers around the world in 1967. The photo showed an apprentice electrical lineman, R.G.
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