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Resveratrol

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NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The first clinical trial to test the effects of resveratrol -- the plant compound plentiful in red wine and grapes -- on humans has found that a small daily dose of a purified resveratrol supplement lowered blood pressure and improved a wide range of human health measures in a small group of obese men. The study , conducted in the Netherlands and published this week in the journal Cell Metabolism, found that men taking 150 milligrams of...
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SCIENCE
March 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists hoping to mimic the life-extending qualities produced by a chemical found in red wine and dark chocolate say they have solved one of the mysteries about how this compound works to combat the effects of obesity, diabetes, certain cancers and a host of other maladies. The findings, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, could lay the foundation for a variety of drugs that act like concentrated amounts of resveratrol, the compound that has inspired a $30-million-a-year supplement business.
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HEALTH
October 8, 2007 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
This antioxidant can protect against cancer, heart disease and diabetes. It can lower cholesterol, reduce inflammation and ease pain. Best of all, perhaps, it can help users live 30% longer than they would without it. Resveratrol -- a substance found most notably in red wine -- is sometimes called a "miracle molecule." In labs around the world, scientists are devoting their lives to studying it, and they're writing so many papers about it that mere mortals are hard-pressed to keep up with them all. In short, the evidence is nearly overwhelming that resveratrol can work wonders for your health.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
It sounds too good to be true, but a Chicago doctor is reporting that a drug-like dietary supplement, or nutriceutical, called Longevinex -- which contains the purported anti-aging chemical resveratrol -- may control or even reverse the symptoms of wet macular degeneration, a severe form of visual impairment. If the results prove to hold up, the treatment would have a great advantage over existing ones, which require injection of chemicals directly into the eye. Longevinex, in contrast, can be taken orally.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
It sounds too good to be true, but a Chicago doctor is reporting that a drug-like dietary supplement, or nutriceutical, called Longevinex -- which contains the purported anti-aging chemical resveratrol -- may control or even reverse the symptoms of wet macular degeneration, a severe form of visual impairment. If the results prove to hold up, the treatment would have a great advantage over existing ones, which require injection of chemicals directly into the eye. Longevinex, in contrast, can be taken orally.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A University of Connecticut researcher who worked on the health benefits of a chemical in red wine fabricated data in 145 separate research projects, a three-year investigation has found. University officials have notified 11 scientific journal studies co-authored by Dipak Das, whose work focused on whether resveratrol -- an antioxidant found in grape skin -- can prevent coronary heart disease or kill cancer cells, according to the Boston Herald. Resveratrol has been linked to these benefits in a number of studies -- just recently, Times health writer Melissa Healy explained a study that showed obese men who took resveratrol in high doses saw their metabolic function improve and evidence of inflammation fall -- almost as if they were becoming more "athletic" without raising a single dumbbell.
HEALTH
March 24, 2012 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Drinkers the world over have been thrilled by the notion that resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine, might be some kind of anti-aging powerhouse. The supposed wonder substance can make perilously chubby lab rats live as long as their slim counterparts, protect them from cancers and reduce their risk of dying from a high-calorie diet. It can lengthen the life of certain fish while warding off brain decay and improving the creatures' swimming chops. Which may sound very alluring for those of us who'd like to think that sipping Pinot Noir while relaxing on a couch counts as doing something healthful.
SCIENCE
March 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists hoping to mimic the life-extending qualities produced by a chemical found in red wine and dark chocolate say they have solved one of the mysteries about how this compound works to combat the effects of obesity, diabetes, certain cancers and a host of other maladies. The findings, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, could lay the foundation for a variety of drugs that act like concentrated amounts of resveratrol, the compound that has inspired a $30-million-a-year supplement business.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Melissa Healy
In August 2003, when scientists first revealed the life-extending powers of trans-3,4,'5-trihydroxystilbene-- also known as resveratrol -- its earthly form had all the allure of an apple in the garden of Eden. Ruby red, delicately fragrant, shapely in a rounded nest of glass, red wine can deliver as much as 1.5 milligrams of the plant compound resveratrol per four-ounce serving.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Researchers believe they have unlocked the mystery of how an antioxidant found in grapes and red wine fights cancer. A study published Friday concludes that the compound resveratrol, which acts like an antibiotic to protect grapes from fungus, may turn off a protein that guards cancer cells from cancer-fighting therapies such as chemotherapy. The research may one day allow the compound itself to be used in cancer prevention and treatment, said Minnie Holmes-McNary, a nutritional biologist at the University of North Carolina's medical school in Chapel Hill.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Resveratrol, the plant compound found in red wine and reputed to have anti-aging effects, including protection against cancer and diabetes, has just had a "told-you-so" moment. Resveratrol 's discoverer, the embattled Harvard professor who hopes it will point the way to new anti-aging drugs, long argued that the phytonutrient worked its magic by "turning on" the SIRT1 gene. The SIRT1 gene, one of a family of genes, the Sirtuins, is believed to control the good function and longevity of cells and, in turn, of their host.
HEALTH
March 24, 2012 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Drinkers the world over have been thrilled by the notion that resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine, might be some kind of anti-aging powerhouse. The supposed wonder substance can make perilously chubby lab rats live as long as their slim counterparts, protect them from cancers and reduce their risk of dying from a high-calorie diet. It can lengthen the life of certain fish while warding off brain decay and improving the creatures' swimming chops. Which may sound very alluring for those of us who'd like to think that sipping Pinot Noir while relaxing on a couch counts as doing something healthful.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A University of Connecticut researcher who worked on the health benefits of a chemical in red wine fabricated data in 145 separate research projects, a three-year investigation has found. University officials have notified 11 scientific journal studies co-authored by Dipak Das, whose work focused on whether resveratrol -- an antioxidant found in grape skin -- can prevent coronary heart disease or kill cancer cells, according to the Boston Herald. Resveratrol has been linked to these benefits in a number of studies -- just recently, Times health writer Melissa Healy explained a study that showed obese men who took resveratrol in high doses saw their metabolic function improve and evidence of inflammation fall -- almost as if they were becoming more "athletic" without raising a single dumbbell.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The first clinical trial to test the effects of resveratrol -- the plant compound plentiful in red wine and grapes -- on humans has found that a small daily dose of a purified resveratrol supplement lowered blood pressure and improved a wide range of human health measures in a small group of obese men. The study , conducted in the Netherlands and published this week in the journal Cell Metabolism, found that men taking 150 milligrams of...
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Melissa Healy
Like aspirin and the heart medicine digitalis, resveratrol is a plant extract -- one with seemingly powerful and broad effects on living organisms. It acts as a phytoestrogen, mimicking many of the hormone estrogen's effects. In the cells of rodents as well as humans, it disrupts the genetic machinery that gives rise to inflammation and to cancerous tumors. In cell cultures of brain tissue, it even cleans up the tangled amyloid deposits that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Melissa Healy
The pitches for resveratrol are as ubiquitous as they are dazzling. Fire up a search engine for red wine, resveratrol or longevity, and the entreaties of supplement makers will line your screen, blinking promises of weight loss, wrinkle reduction, greater vitality and -- yes -- even "increased erection hardness . . . sexual sensitivity, pleasure and ejaculatory volume." But that's not all.
HEALTH
May 10, 2004 | Elena Conis
The compound resveratrol is produced by some plants to fight fungi and help heal injuries. It's found in high concentrations in peanuts, mulberries, grape skins, wine (particularly red wine) and the Japanese knotweed plant. When scientists first identified the low risk of heart disease among the red-wine- drinking French several years ago, some attributed the phenomenon to the strong antioxidizing powers of resveratrol.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Resveratrol, the plant compound found in red wine and reputed to have anti-aging effects, including protection against cancer and diabetes, has just had a "told-you-so" moment. Resveratrol 's discoverer, the embattled Harvard professor who hopes it will point the way to new anti-aging drugs, long argued that the phytonutrient worked its magic by "turning on" the SIRT1 gene. The SIRT1 gene, one of a family of genes, the Sirtuins, is believed to control the good function and longevity of cells and, in turn, of their host.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Melissa Healy
In August 2003, when scientists first revealed the life-extending powers of trans-3,4,'5-trihydroxystilbene-- also known as resveratrol -- its earthly form had all the allure of an apple in the garden of Eden. Ruby red, delicately fragrant, shapely in a rounded nest of glass, red wine can deliver as much as 1.5 milligrams of the plant compound resveratrol per four-ounce serving.
HEALTH
October 8, 2007 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
This antioxidant can protect against cancer, heart disease and diabetes. It can lower cholesterol, reduce inflammation and ease pain. Best of all, perhaps, it can help users live 30% longer than they would without it. Resveratrol -- a substance found most notably in red wine -- is sometimes called a "miracle molecule." In labs around the world, scientists are devoting their lives to studying it, and they're writing so many papers about it that mere mortals are hard-pressed to keep up with them all. In short, the evidence is nearly overwhelming that resveratrol can work wonders for your health.
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