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Retin A Drug

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NEWS
December 6, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
An expansion of a study that demonstrated the anti-wrinkling properties of Retin-A has shown that the drug produces even more dramatic improvements when used over a longer period of time, researchers said Monday. "The longer you use it, the better it works," said Dr. John J. Voorhees, author of the study, speaking at a press conference during a meeting here of the American Academy of Dermatology. "It does a good job of getting rid of fine wrinkles and reducing deep furrows caused by sun damage."
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charges Filed Over Retin-A Promotion: A former employee of Johnson & Johnson was charged with conspiracy to defraud the Food and Drug Administration, federal prosecutors said. The charges against Lester Riley stem from the improper promotion of the acne-fighting drug for use as an agent to combat wrinkles. The charges came a day after Ortho Pharmaceutical, a unit of New Brunswick, N.J.
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NEWS
July 23, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The early reports tantalized: Retin-A, the highly successful acne cream, might help diminish some undesirable effects of sun-damaged skin--fine wrinkles, sagging, blotchiness. After more than three years of hype and hoopla, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has put the clamp on discussion of Retin-A as a treatment for sun-damaged skin, at least for now.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House subcommittee is accusing the Food and Drug Administration of failing to warn consumers about risks from products claiming to erase wrinkles and improve appearances. In a report to be released today, the panel urges that the FDA be given greater authority to investigate the cosmetic drugs' safety as well as possible financial conflicts of interest involving researchers who tout the popular products.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charges Filed Over Retin-A Promotion: A former employee of Johnson & Johnson was charged with conspiracy to defraud the Food and Drug Administration, federal prosecutors said. The charges against Lester Riley stem from the improper promotion of the acne-fighting drug for use as an agent to combat wrinkles. The charges came a day after Ortho Pharmaceutical, a unit of New Brunswick, N.J.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnson & Johnson is being investigated over whether it promoted unapproved uses for Retin-A, its acne treatment drug. "We have been advised an investigation is under way through the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Jersey to determine whether there has been any illegal promotion of Retin-A," a company spokesman said. The spokesman said a 1988 article in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. reported on the successful treatment of wrinkles with Retin-A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preliminary results of the largest study of its kind have confirmed that the active ingredient in Retin-A, the controversial anti-aging drug, can produce modest cosmetic improvements in sun-damaged or aged skin, UC Irvine researchers said Monday. In the first six months of a two-year study, 68% of 657 patients nationwide showed some improvement with wrinkles or sunspots using an emollient cream with .05% retinoic acid (tretinoin). A control group showed only 38% improvement.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House subcommittee is accusing the Food and Drug Administration of failing to warn consumers about risks from products claiming to erase wrinkles and improve appearances. In a report to be released today, the panel urges that the FDA be given greater authority to investigate the cosmetic drugs' safety as well as possible financial conflicts of interest involving researchers who tout the popular products.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David A. Kessler, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, warned Tuesday that his agency will not tolerate the illegal use of drugs and medical devices that he said may pose "significant dangers" to consumers, including injections of liquid silicone to remove wrinkles. "This is an illegal product and its use must stop," he said in testimony before a House Government Operations subcommittee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The much-touted skin cream Retin-A may fight wrinkles by helping to anchor the body's outer layer of skin to the inner layer, researchers said last week. The prescription cream, known generically as retinoic acid, attracted wide attention in January, 1988, when a study in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. said it had diminished wrinkles and other aging signs in 14 of 15 middle-aged subjects tested at the University of Michigan.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The early reports tantalized: Retin-A, the highly successful acne cream, might help diminish some undesirable effects of sun-damaged skin--fine wrinkles, sagging, blotchiness. After more than three years of hype and hoopla, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has put the clamp on discussion of Retin-A as a treatment for sun-damaged skin, at least for now.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnson & Johnson is being investigated over whether it promoted unapproved uses for Retin-A, its acne treatment drug. "We have been advised an investigation is under way through the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Jersey to determine whether there has been any illegal promotion of Retin-A," a company spokesman said. The spokesman said a 1988 article in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. reported on the successful treatment of wrinkles with Retin-A.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David A. Kessler, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, warned Tuesday that his agency will not tolerate the illegal use of drugs and medical devices that he said may pose "significant dangers" to consumers, including injections of liquid silicone to remove wrinkles. "This is an illegal product and its use must stop," he said in testimony before a House Government Operations subcommittee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The much-touted skin cream Retin-A may fight wrinkles by helping to anchor the body's outer layer of skin to the inner layer, researchers said last week. The prescription cream, known generically as retinoic acid, attracted wide attention in January, 1988, when a study in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. said it had diminished wrinkles and other aging signs in 14 of 15 middle-aged subjects tested at the University of Michigan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preliminary results of the largest study of its kind have confirmed that the active ingredient in Retin-A, the controversial anti-aging drug, can produce modest cosmetic improvements in sun-damaged or aged skin, UC Irvine researchers said Monday. In the first six months of a two-year study, 68% of 657 patients nationwide showed some improvement with wrinkles or sunspots using an emollient cream with .05% retinoic acid (tretinoin). A control group showed only 38% improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1989 | SALLY SQUIRES, Squires is a medical writer for the Washington Post health section, in which this story originally appeared
Zonker Harris, the Doonesbury comic-strip character known for his great tan, got the message and went "pale" a few months ago. But for sun worshipers still denying the dangers of too much sun, a government panel issued a report recently that left no more room for doubt. The 14-member panel, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, spent two days examining the scientific evidence on the effects of sunlight and ultraviolet radiation on the skin.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Food and Drug Administration officials are threatening to take action against a Chatsworth shampoo and skin-care company unless it stops selling a beauty cream that it claims "helps reduce the visible signs of aging." In an Aug. 31 letter to St. Ives Laboratories, George J. Gerstenberg, district director of the FDA in Los Angeles, demanded that the company stop selling its Retinyl-A cream, accusing St. Ives of "false and misleading" labeling of the product. Gerstenberg added that because St.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
An expansion of a study that demonstrated the anti-wrinkling properties of Retin-A has shown that the drug produces even more dramatic improvements when used over a longer period of time, researchers said Monday. "The longer you use it, the better it works," said Dr. John J. Voorhees, author of the study, speaking at a press conference during a meeting here of the American Academy of Dermatology. "It does a good job of getting rid of fine wrinkles and reducing deep furrows caused by sun damage."
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