Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRetinoblastoma Gene
IN THE NEWS

Retinoblastoma Gene

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An anti-cancer gene that helps guard against lung and breast cancer may perform its lifesaving function by shutting down a gene that helps stimulate cell growth, researchers said last week. Researchers have suspected that an anti-cancer gene, called the retinoblastoma gene, might act by shutting off one or more cell-growth genes. But they didn't know which ones.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An anti-cancer gene that helps guard against lung and breast cancer may perform its lifesaving function by shutting down a gene that helps stimulate cell growth, researchers said last week. Researchers have suspected that an anti-cancer gene, called the retinoblastoma gene, might act by shutting off one or more cell-growth genes. But they didn't know which ones.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Researchers at UC San Diego using a gene replacement technique have taken a major step toward the development of a new form of cancer therapy. A team headed by molecular biologist Wen-Hwa Lee has for the first time converted cancer cells grown in a laboratory into healthy cells by replacing a defective gene with a normal gene.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Researchers at UC San Diego using a gene replacement technique have taken a major step toward the development of a new form of cancer therapy. A team headed by molecular biologist Wen-Hwa Lee has for the first time converted cancer cells grown in a laboratory into healthy cells by replacing a defective gene with a normal gene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
In what is believed to be a significant step toward understanding the genetics of cancer, a team of young researchers in San Diego has cloned and analyzed the structure of a newly discovered gene that may serve to block the development of cancer in humans. The gene, which has been the focus of intense competition among research teams in the United States and Canada, was first cloned last year by a group in Boston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The retinoblastoma gene, the prototype member of a family of so-called anti-oncogenes that protect against certain types of cancer, can suppress growth of prostate cancer cells, UC San Diego researchers reported in Science last week. The gene had previously been reported to have the same effect in retinoblastoma--a rare tumor of the eye--breast cancer, bone cancer and small-cell lung cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The study of oncogenes--genes that cause cancer--is one of the most promising approaches to understanding cancer, many scientists believe. Now, scientists are gaining insight into not only oncogenes but their "mirror images," anti-oncogenes, which protect cells from cancer. Such studies, they say, may lead to the development of entirely new ways to treat cancer. The first oncogene (from the Greek onkos, meaning mass or tumor) was isolated in the early 1970s from a virus that causes cancer in chickens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A noted molecular biologist and pioneer in cancer genetics is leaving UC San Diego to found a University of Texas institute in San Antonio. Wen-Hwa Lee, 39, will give up a professorship in UCSD's School of Medicine to become professor and director at the Institute of Biotechnology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The development marks the second time this summer that the medical school has learned it is losing a top researcher. Dr.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
On Tuesday, two biotech companies announced that it would soon be possible to sequence the human genome -- each individual's complete DNA blueprint -- in about a day for around $1,000. On Wednesday, researchers at St. Jude Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and Washington University in St. Louis reported scientific results that hint at how this type of inexpensive genetic testing might help patients.   In one study, researchers sequenced the genomes of cancer cells from 12 St. Jude patients with early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and discovered that genetically, the subtype had more in common with a different type of leukemia than with other acute lymphoblastic leukemias.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|